The value of history lies, in a great degree, in the biography of the personages concerned therein.

The annals of the settlers delineate the pioneer period, while those of the later residents exhibit the progress of the country and the status of the present generation.

Osceola County gives a vivid illustration of these statements; but its wonderful pioneer era laps upon its present period in a manner so gradual that there is really no distinctive line of demarcation.

Many of those whose efforts gave the country its earliest impetus may still be seen upon its thoroughfares; many of the characters in the day of its first things are still on the stage, and watch with keen-eyed alertness the manipulations, successes and reverses of the present day, still jealous for the reputation of the county and eagerly solicitous for her substantial and permanent progress.

The compilers of these records strive to establish their claim for biographical integrity, preparing the matter from the stand-point of no man's prejudice.

The full scope of the personal record here is to demonstrate the exact relation of every individual represented to the generations of the past and of the present.

Succeeding ages sweep away the debris of human errors and perpetuate the real greatness of a community.

Character stands out statuesque, and events cluster about individuals, forming the grandest and truest historical structure of which any age is capable.

Only biography can fitly represent the foundation, progress and ultimatum of local history, and portray with perfect justice the precise attitude and relation of men to events and conditions.

Osceola County is justly proud of her pioneer record, and, so far as possible, the publishers have endeavored to honor the representatives of that period as well as those of to-day.

Labor and suffering, undergone in the light of hope and the earnestness of honest effort and toil, established this county in permanent prosperity, and is rounding up a period of glorious completeness.

Her villages are creditable, her agricultural community is composed of the best class, and her professional men are of marked integrity.

In collecting the following sketches the purpose has been to collect the main points of personal record, through which the enterprise of decades to follow may complete a perfect and continuous historical outline from the earliest settlement of the county to the present time.

Charles H. Holden

CHARLES H. HOLDEN, of Reed City, Mich., the subject of this sketch, was born April 18, 1832, at Groton, Grafton Co., N. H.

His father, Josiah Rhodes Holden, was born in Groton, Feb. 22, 1797, and was married to Joanna Reed Danforth, Jan. 24, 1824.

She was born in Londonderry, N. H., March 10, 1800.

Of their six children but three survive: Hon. E. G. D. Holden, of Grand Rapids, Mich.; Mrs. Fannie L. Fowler, wife of a prominent lawyer and capitalist at Manistee, Mich.; and C. H, of this sketch.

When the latter was an infant of two months his parents matured a long considered plan of removing West, and set out for Illinois.

Reaching Buffalo, they took passage for Cleveland, having learned of the disturbed condition of the country in that then undeveloped and remote section, where fabled resources awoke the smoldering fires of dormant ambitions, and lured the footsteps of the young and ardent towards its goals of promise.

The difficulties with the Sacs and Foxes culminated in the conflict known in history as the "Black Hawk War."

The rumors which found their way easterly, at first vague and filled with an undefined terror, gradually assumed the tangibility of fact, and the tide of immigration stayed its waves in the nearer and more peaceful commonwealth of the Buckeye State.

The summer sped on and various complications detained those who had paused to await the end of the Indian trouble, and when the region of the Northwest was again free from the turmoil of strife it was too late to press on to the original destination.

The approach of autumn portended winter which with its associations bore little of encouragement to navigators to untried regions, and many families clung to the ties which, though so recently formed, borrowed from circumstances an added strength, and settled to await the advent of another spring.

Josiah R. Holden was among the heads of families who "had gained a foothold, but born of a sorrow which to him seemed irreparable.

In one short week the grim messenger, death, invaded that happy family and took to its icy embrace two boys, one-half of his family group,—the first and third,—leaving the second and the subject of this sketch, then an infant.

In 1834 they started from Cleveland for Chicago, which then comprised Fort Dearborn and two trading posts.

They made the trip on the first steamer that made the passage of the Straits at Mackinaw.

Ten days after reaching Chicago they went to Will County, ILL., and located on 160 acres of prairie and timber land situated on the Du Page River in the vicinity of Joliet.

The senior Holden entered into the work of the pioneer settler with all the vigor, hopefulness and energy of purpose he inherited from his ancestral stock and which associations of the place of his birth had fostered and preserved in their native strength.

He erected a hotel and had succeeded in establishing a line of business connections which promised future realizations in proportion to the spirit and deserts of their originator, when the financial crisis of 1837 supervened, and by its reduction of values, aided by the complications attendant upon the miscellaneous currency, appropriately styled "wild-cat money," overwhelmed the relations of business, and Mr. Holden was forced to dispose of his estate at a sacrifice, which was synonymous with financial ruin.

Leaving his family settled at Plainfield, in Will County, he went to Arkansas to retrieve his losses, and after an absence of three years returned and removed his family to Moorsville, near New Albany, Indiana.

In 1845 they came to Michigan and settled on a farm of 160 acres situated twelve miles from the city of Grand Rapids.

The territory of Kent County, which is now one of the finest samples of the probabilities of Michigan, as well as a manifest of the character of her pioneers and their efforts, was then undeveloped, and Mr. Holden of this sketch, then a boy of 13, was the father's assistant in the work of clearing the home farm.

The parents yet survive and reside in Grand Rapids, aged respectively 87 and 84 years.

Their two sons are in the fullness of their manhood and have crowned the ambitious hopes of the father and the unfaltering trust of the mother with the honors of their distinguished and successful careers.

 

Hon. E. G. D. Holden, of Grand Rapids, is one of the “eminent men of Michigan," and wrought every step of his upward career by hard, systematic work, until he has a record which reflects luster on his entire generation.

His election to the position of Secretary of State of Michigan is among the most signal triumphs in the register of the Peninsular State.

Charles H. Holden has descended from illustrious ancestry, and belongs to a race that has been made conspicuous by distinctive traits.

The student of history may always turn from his futile and bewildering guest in search of a reliable basis whereon to found a just opinion of a large majority of the characters of history to the records of the Puritans.

Though they have been the objects of derision, contumely and vituperation, no assault has availed to hurl the class from its position. It has stood statuesque in the history of the world since the days of Elizabeth, and its appellation is the synonym for, sound morality and unswerving purpose.

The records of business since the period of the earliest dissenters, in all avenues, exhibit traces of their inflexible methods.

They have been the founders of some of the most substantial and popular financial projects; they have shone peerlessly in literature; they have walked unflinchingly to the block and bared their throats to the headsman's ax with firm fingers, and invited the fatal blade with the same calmness in which they were wont to stretch themselves for repose on luxuriant couches in palatial homes.

It is a grand type of humanity, and its fineness of grain is still inbred in our own composite nationality.

It is like the essence of the cassava, preservative and antiseptic, and from its reproduction in succeeding generations it receives a fresh impetus, and takes in renewed vitality.

The name of Holden first appears in the records of the New World in 1609, when Richard Holden, a refugee Puritan, from the town of Leyden, came to America, followed in r61r and in 1612 respectively by Justinian and Randall Holden, of the same persecuted fraternity.

The earliest traceable ancestors of the family of C. H. Holden was John Holden, born in 1692, from whom the line is intact.

In the maternal line he is of Scottish origin; his mother being descended from the Greggs of Ayrshire, and traced to 1690.

The earliest independent individual purpose of Mr. Holden, of this sketch, was to obtain an education, and he availed himself of every advantage of the public schools in the sections of Illinois where his parents resided, and after their removal to Kent County, Michigan, alternated his seasons of labor with study at the terms of winter school.

He served the family interests faithfully and well, and at 18 his father gave him all the aid he could toward the accomplishment of his plans,—the control of his time, —that he might pursue his educational project untrammeled.

He had sufficient means to enter the academy at Plainfield, Illinois, where he spent a year preparatory to becoming a student at Oberlin, Ohio.

At the latter place he took a classical course of study, in which he was occupied three years, earning money to defray his expenses by teaching winters; the fourth, or final, year of his collegiate course was passed at Knox College, Illinois.

On leaving college he was free from debt; his industry had earned all he needed, and his frugality had expended his earnings to the best possible advantage, and best of all he had the eminent satisfaction of knowing that what he had accomplished was his own work, and at the cost of no sacrifice at home.

He entered the office of Patterson & Champlin at Grand Rapids, Mich., as a student of law, and read under their supervision two years, gaining much advantage from their office relations ; after which one year was spent in Columbia Law College, Washington, D. C, where he was graduated.

After a year's practice in Grand Rapids he finally located at Grand Traverse, and in the fall of 1858 was elected Prosecuting Attorney and Circuit Court Commissioner for that county.

The territory then embraced within its limits now comprises the counties of Leelanaw, Antrim, Kalkaska and Benzie.

The district politically was Democratic, yet he was elected over his competitor, Frank Stevens, by 23 majority, being the only one on the Republican ticket that was elected in the county that year.

He was re-elected in 1860 and officiated until the President's second call for troops, when he felt the need of arduous service in behalf of the national integrity, and he abandoned a prosperous business and raised a company of volunteers, afterwards known as the "Lake Shore Tigers," Co. A, 26th Mich. Vol., and was mustered as its First Lieutenant on the 11th day of September, 1862.

During the spring of 1863 his regiment participated in the Blackwater campaign near Suffolk, Va., against Longstreet.

During the draft riots at New York City in July, 1863, his regiment was ordered to New York, and Mr. Holden was placed on the staff of Gen. Canby, as Commissary of Subsistence.

The arduous work of providing for 30,000 troops hastily concentrated at the city of New York during this emergency required rare executive skill and prompt action in meeting and providing for the wants of the soldiers.

How well he discharged the duty of this trust may be inferred from the fact that he, a volunteer officer, was retained in preference to old line regular officers, who never looked with favor upon the volunteer service.

During this period Mr. Holden handled millions of dollars for the Government in purchasing supplies for the army and in disbursements to the various hospitals in and about the city, and, be it said to his credit, every dollar was accounted for to the last farthing, as the records of the Department will show.

On the 15th of October his regiment was ordered to join the Army of the Potomac and became a part of the First Brigade, First Division, Second Corps, under Gen. Hancock, in which capacity the regiment remained until the close of the war.

The cessation of the hostilities afforded opportunities to retrieve errors and for the recognition and acknowledgment of meritorious services.

Mr. Holden received two brevets first as Major, and lastly Lieutenant Colonel. On being relieved of his obligations as a soldier, he was appointed to a position by the Secretary of the Treasury in the Loan Branch, Treasury Department, where he was attached to the bureau for printing and disbursing the 7-30 bonds.

Later he was attached to the Second Auditor's office, where he remained until 1870.

In June, 1869, he was chosen to represent the 5th Ward, afterwards 20th District, Washington, D. C., in the City Council: he was re-elected in 1870, and chosen President of the Board of Common Council, being the 69th and last Council of said city.

During his administration and management of the trust reposed in him by his constituency, he advocated and perfected many plans, such as parking the avenues and a system of drainage, which has since been adopted, placing the city upon a plane its founders intended it should occupy and become the handsomest city on the continent.

The plan here inaugurated was taken up and carried forward by the new life which had been infused by the new order of things, and Washington of to-day is the pride of the nation and the most beautiful city in the world.

During the years 1869-70-71-72, Mr. Holden contributed to "the city in beautiful brick blocks, aggregating over a hundred residences, with an outlay of capital involved of more than half a million dollars.

He was also largely engaged in the purchase and sale of real estate.

It is said of him that he rarely, if ever, made a mistake in buying real estate; his purchases always panned out with a profit, and in a few years he had risen to the foremost rank among the live business men in Washington City.

But success in any vocation is not absolutely assured.

The panic of 1873 had its depressing effect on values, and with it the consequent roll of disaster; the business men of the entire country were the chief sufferers; fortune vanished as if by magic, and lack of confidence and general distrust pervaded the business world.

Mr. Holden was not alone in adversity, and when the storm had spent its fury he found himself bereft of his entire fortune!

In 1878 he visited the West, determined to retrieve past losses, by commencing again at the bottom in new and untried fields, unaided save by the light of experience.

Reed City, Osceola Co., Mich., was the point selected, and in the month of June, the following year, he opened an office for the transaction of business as an attorney and dealer in real estate, and continued the management of his relations alone until Oct. 31, 1881, the date of the admission of Charles A. Withey, the firm style becoming Holden & Withey.

This firm is now the most prominent in Northern Michigan and is largely interested in real-estate operations in connection with a large and lucrative law practice.

Mr. Holden has done much to improve, enlarge and beautify Reed City; he has been instrumental in adding additions and a beautiful park to the city; last season he purchased the Heath-House Block, and more than doubled its dimensions and leased it for a term of years to Norman Johnson, M. D., Manager of the Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota Hospital Company.

This institution is now one of the largest and best conducted hospitals in the State.

It is also a sanitarium.

The edifice is brick, four stories in height above the basement and covers a little over an acre of land, and is the most attractive structure in the city.

The firm own a large amount of village and farm property; they also issue a monthly, the title of which is Real Estate Bulletin.

In the year 1869, while a resident of the National Capital, Mr. Holden became a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is now a member of Lafayette Chapter; also Columbia Commandery, No. 2, Knights Templar, and Knights of Pythias, all local organizations of Washington City.

In 1883 he was elected Commander of Stedman Post, No. 198, G. A. R., of Reed City, and is now serving his second term; he is also Commander of the Soldiers and Sailors' Association of Northwestern Michigan, an organization including within its limits the northwest quarter of the State.

Mr. Holden was married Feb. 9, 1859, to Fannie E. Brooks, daughter of Horatio and Elizabeth Brooks, of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Four children born to Mr. and Mrs. Holden died in infancy.

The portrait of Mr. Holden which is presented on a preceding page is a fitting accompaniment to the biographical annals of Osceola County.

His youth's first endeavor was as a pioneer laborer in the development of Northern Michigan, which has supplied some of the best elements in the progressive history of this country; and to it he has brought the energies of his manhood's prime, which are among its most valuable factors in its present condition of promise, fast approaching fulfillment and the fullness which characterizes adjacent, as well as remote, sections of the Peninsular State.

 

E. J. Terrill, merchant and Postmaster at Avondale, and farmer, section 26, Hartwick Township, was born July 23, 1837, in Middletown, Vt.

His father, Ezra Terrill, was a farmer in the Green Mountain State, where he was born in the town of Middletown in Rutland County.

In early life he was a miller.

Later he went with his family to the State of New York, where he reared his family.

In 1865, the Terrills, father and son, came to Michigan, where they remained at that time but a year, going in 1866 to Jones County, Iowa.

There the mother, Orra (Newland) Terrill, died, June 11, 1870.

She was born in Vermont. In March, 1881, Mr. Terrill, of this sketch, removed his family to Hartwick Township, whither he came a month earlier and bought 40 acres of land, on which some improvements had been made.

He afterwards erected a building for a store, put in a stock of goods worth $1,200, and has since transacted a fairly good business as a merchant.

On the establishment of the post office at this point he was appointed Postmaster.

The senior Terrill died at the home of his son, March 9, 1883.

Mr. Terrill is a Republican in political sentiment.

He was married Feb. 20, 1862, at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., to Bertha Bachelor, and they have the following named children: Orra L., born July 2, 1863; Inez M., March 14, 1867; Irma L., Aug. 23, 1869, and died Oct. 8, 1870; Albert K, Nov. 18, 1872.

The mother is the daughter of Nathaniel and Lucretia (Ward) Bachelor.

Her parents were natives respeciively of Vermont and Massachusetts, and they located in North Amherst, Mass., where the mother died.

The father went to St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., married a second time, and died there in March, 1862.

Mrs. Terrill was born in Conway, Franklin Co., Mass., and was 12 years of age when she was taken by her father to the State of New York.

Mr. and Mrs. Terrill are members of the Baptist Church.

 

Jacob Swarthout, farmer, section 32, Sherman Township, was born in Waterloo, Seneca Co., N. Y., Aug. 16, 1843.

John Swarthout, his father, was born at Seneca Falls, N. Y., and has been a farmer and blacksmith during his active life.

He is of German extraction and married Amanda Taylor, a native of Wayne Co., N. Y. She died in 1848, in Seneca County.

The father is a resident of Ionia County, and is 84 years of age.

Soon after the death of his wife he removed with his family to Hillsdale Co., Mich., removing later to his present location.

After the death of his mother when he was five years of age, Mr. Swarthout was under the care of his father until he was 11 years old, when he took the control of his course of life into his own hands.

He found home and employment among the farmers of Hillsdale County until he became a fireman on the Michigan Southern Railroad.

He "fired" about 13 months, after which he was entrusted with an engine on the same road, although he was not yet 15.

He served in that capacity three years.

He enlisted Aug. 21, 1861, under the second call of President Lincoln for men to aid in the restoration of a “solid" Union, enrolling in the First Michigan Cavalry, under Colonel Broadhead, who was killed in the second battle at Bull Run.

Mr. Swarthout was in the cavalry 15 months, and was a participant in all the fights in which his regiment was involved, among which were Winchester, Oliver Heights and the capture of Harper's Ferry.

He was discharged for disability, but soon re-enlisted in Battery F, Light Artillery, from Flint, Mich.

His command accompanied Sherman through the Georgia campaign, and he fought in the following engagements: Resaca, May 14; Pine Hill, June 10; Lost Mountain, June 15; around the Kenesaw Mountains, June 22; Atlanta, July 21, 22 and 27. (These were contests of 1864.)

Aug. 4, 8, 9 and 1 1, the forces were in action near Atlanta, where Battery F had the honor of throwing the first shell.

Mr. Swarthout also took part in the battle near Kingston, N. C., March 10, 1865.

He received his discharge July 8, 1865, at Jackson, Mich., and returned to Hillsdale County.

He resumed his former occupation of farmer, in which he continued four years.

In October, 1869, he came to Osceola County, where he made a homestead claim of the real estate he has owned ever since, situated on section 32, Sherman Township, and consisting of 80 acres of land.

The entire acreage was in its forest condition, and he has now 55 acres under most creditable cultivation, and forming one of the most desirable and valuable farms in the township.

He has recently built a large barn.

He is a skilled farmer and a trusted, respected citizen.

Politically he is a Republican, and has served as Township Treasurer.

He was married Nov. 26, 1868, in Hillsdale Co, Mich., to Emma Convis.

They have one child— Ethel—born April 23, 1870.

Mrs. Swarthout was born Aug. 22, 1849, in Wheatland Township, Hillsdale County, and is the daughter of Philo D. and Huldah (Halleck) Convis.

The father still resides on the homestead where the mother died, in July, 1867.

 

William W. Cushman, farmer and lumber, man, resident on section 22, Middle Branch Township, was born Jan. 25, 1843, in Penobscot Co., Maine.

He was reared on a farm and remained on the family homestead until he was 20 years of age.

In 1863 he began to operate as a saw-mill assistant on the Penobscot River.

Two years later he came to Michigan and engaged in lumbering in the region of the head-waters of Cass River in Tuscola and Sanilac Counties, proceeding thence to Rouge River in Kent County, where he was similarly interested.

Later he went to the State of Wisconsin, returning afterward to Michigan.

In 1869 he made a claim of 160 acres of land in Middle Branch Township, on which he at once settled permanently, and engaged in lumbering.

To this he has added 150 acres by later purchase.

His lumbering operations have been transacted on the Middle Branch and Muskegon Rivers, and have chiefly occupied his time.

The improvements on his farm are still limited.

He is a Democrat in political preference, and has served as Road Commissioner and School Inspector.

Mr. Cushman was married Sept. 1, 1872, in Hartwick Township, to Laura E. Coil.

She was born Nov. 6, 1847, in Mercer Co., Ohio, and accompanied her parents to Osceola County when she was 12 years old.

The children born to herself and husband are six in number: Sumner, Linwood, Mark W., Lucretia J. and James W.

An infant died unnamed.

 

David Shadley, farmer, lumberman and stockman, resident on section 24, Hartwick Township, was born Dec. 26, 1841, in Hardin Co., Ohio.

He is of German and Irish descent, and his parents were natives of the State of Virginia.

They came later to Ohio, and are now buried in the family burial place in Hardin County.

Mr. Shadley was sent to school while a child, but on acquiring sufficient growth and strength he was called to make practical use of both on his father's farm, where he continued his efforts until his marriage, Feb. 26, 1863, to Elizabeth J. Clark.

Her parents, Thomas and Mary (Judah) Clark, were born in Fairfield Co., Ohio.

She was born May 7, 1841, in Fairfield Co., Ohio, and soon after her parents removed to Seneca County in the same State.

Ten years later, in 1851, they went to Hardin County, where they now reside and manage extensive farming interests.

They are aged 67 and 70 years, and are prominent members of the community to which they belong.

Mrs. Shadley was educated in Hardin County, and resided with her parents until her marriage at 19.

Her six children were born in the following order: Clement L., Dec. 27, 1863; Llewellyn M., Aug. 9, 1865; Samantha A., Nov. 8, 1866; Lewis L., May 10, 1869; Esther R., July —, 187i; Homer O., Nov. 28, 1876.

In March following his marriage, Mr. Shadley located on a farm in Hardin County, which he conducted four years.

They set out from thence in April, 1867, and traversed the entire distance to Hartwick with a team, coming in a pioneer wagon, and consuming 23 days in the trip.

There was no thoroughfare built over the last six miles of their route; snow lay four feet deep on the ground, and they had to cut their road into the bush.

Their rate of travel was so slow that they were obliged to sleep in their wagon in the dense woods.

They had brought with them their household effects, and on arrival at their destination they had no shelter for either themselves or their belongings, and they lived in their wagon until it was possible to construct a rude house.

Mr. Shadley had made a homestead claim of 160 acres, and later bought 160 acres additional, making a splendid farm of a half section in extent, of which 200 acres is in a cultivated condition.

Since his arrival and settlement, Mr. Shadley has operated extensively in several branches of lumbering, and has arrangements completed for "putting in" about 2,000,000 feet in the winter of 1884-5.

He is a Prohibitionist in political opinion, and has been Township Supervisor several years; is now a member of the School Board.

Mrs. Shadley is a member of the sect known as Seventh-Day Adventists.

 

Arthur Blanchard, farmer, section 29, Hersey Township, was born in Onondaga, New York, October 15, 1857 and is the son of Loren and Ester (Marsh) Blanchard.

The parents are residents on section 32 in Hersey Township.

The father works to some extent as a carpenter.

The family came to Michigan in 1860, first fixing their home in Sharon Township, Washtenaw County.

The father bought 160 acres of land, where he operated as an agriculturist until 1872.

On selling the place he removed to Ann Arbor, returning thence to a second farm in Sharon Township, of which he became the owner, comprising 80 acres.

In 1877 he again sold out and purchased 80 acres in Hersey Township.

In 1882 he bought 80 acres additional.

Father and son are in partnership, and both equally interested in paying for their joint property, the second purchase of land being in the son's name.

The latter was married Aug. 28, 1881, to Anna Richards.

Alice A., only child, was born June 8,1882.

Mrs. Blanchard is the daughter of William R. and Lydia A. (Edwards) Richards.

Her father was a soldier in the Union service and was captured by the rebels at Olusta, Florida, Feb. 12, 1864, and incarcerated in the stockade prison at Andersonville, where he died July 19, 1864, from the combined effects of exposure, hardship and hunger.

He was born Aug. 23, 1813, in Monmouthshire, England, was married in his native country and in 1844 emigrated with his family to the United States, locating primarily at Hopkinton, Mass., where he operated as a blacksmith.

The mother died in New England.

Mrs. Blanchard was born Jan. 12, 1852, at Hopkinton.

She is a lady of more than ordinary intellectual abilities and culture, and during 1881-2 was School Superintendent of Hersey Township.

Mr. Blanchard is a Republican in the truest sense of the term.

Philip Haslam, farmer on section 32, Richmond Township, is a son of John and Ann Haslam, natives of Ireland.

His father died in that country and his mother emigrated to America, and died in Noble County, Ind.

The subject of this sketch was also born on the “Emerald Isle," the date of his birth being Jan. - 6, 1819.

He came to this country in 1849 and lived in the city of Rochester about eight years, then in Auburn, same State, for a while, then some time in Lenawee Co., Mich., then in Indiana, and finally, in the fall of 1858, he came to this county, taking possession of 80 acres of land where he now resides and has 60 acres in cultivation and good productive condition.

Mr. H. has served as Overseer of Highways; in political science he takes the views of the "National" party, and in religion he is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, of which Mrs. H. is also a member.

He was married in Auburn, N. Y., to Julia O'Neil, and they had seven children, viz.: John J., Sarah, Catherine, Mary J., Julia, Elisha and Abigail: the last two are deceased.

Mrs. H. died, in this county, in May, 1878, and Mr. Haslam was again married, in Auburn, N. Y., to Mrs. Ellen, nee Loven, widow of John Chester, who died in Auburn.

She has two children by her first husband,—Maria and John.

 

Isaac Smith, farmer, section 30, Burdell Township, was born May 8, 1834, in Huron Township, Wayne County, New York.

Daniel Smith, his father, was born in Ontario, and descended from New England parentage.

He was a mechanic in early life but entered the ministry, and although more than 80 years old, he is still actively engaged in parochial labor, in Kansas.

Isaac's mother, Grata A. (Stage) Smith, was born in the State of New York, of New England parentage, and spent her whole life in the Empire State.

She died in August, 1847, in Huron, Wayne County.

Her six children outlived her, and are still living, with one exception.

Mr. Smith was 13 years of age when his mother died. Later, his father went to Wisconsin, where the son accompanied him and remained with him until he reached the age of 19, when he came to Manistee, Mich.

There was at that date—1858—scarcely a settlement at that point.

He continued to operate there three years, meanwhile purchasing in Berrien County 40 acres of land, located in Three Oaks Township.

In June, 1854, he settled on his farm, where he resided some years, and combined his farming operations with the manufacture of brick and tile.

He enlisted in the 25th Mich. Vol. Inf., and was wounded in the lower right leg by a rifle shot, at Tubb's Bend, on Green River, Ky.

He was sent to the hospital at Louisville, and thence to Madison, Wisconsin, on sick leave, where he officiated as nurse, nearly a year, and was transferred from there to Indianapolis to guard rebel prisoners.

He received his discharge July 8, 1865, and returned to Three Oaks, resuming his agricultural operations.

He was married Sept. 18, 1865, to Barbara A. Sevice.

Their children are Mabel and Lucas H.

In the spring of 1871, Mr. Smith removed with his family to Osceola Co., Mich., and entered a homestead claim of 160 acres in Burdell Township.

The settlers were few in number, remotely situated, and the forest was unbroken where he settled.

He has improved his farm until it is one of the finest in the township, and includes 100 acres cleared and tillable land.

His first wife died, and he was again married April 21, 1878, in Dover Township, Lake County, Mich., to Mrs. Sarah E. (McNary) Hicks, daughter of Isaac and Lucretia (Rellyea) McNary.

She was a widow and by her former husband she had one child,— James W.,—born May 7, 1861.

She was born in Binghamton, Broome Co., N. Y., Sept. 19, 1840, and came with her parents to Chicago when she was seven years of age.

They remained there but two years, becoming alarmed by the appearance of cholera.

They went to Elgin, Ill., whence her father went two years later to Iowa.

The family settled in Fayette County, where she was educated.

She was first married at Brush Creek, in May, 1860.

Her father is a farmer in Nebraska and is 73 years of age.

Her mother died in Iowa, in 1868, at the age of 54.

Mr. Smith is a Republican in political sentiment, has been Justice of the Peace and held the various school offices.

The family attends the Christian Church, of which the parents are members.

 

Anthony Wenzel, of the manufacturing firm of Wenzel Brothers at Le Roy, was born in June 19, 1848, in Austria.

His parents , Joseph an Caroline Wenzel, removed to their family and interests from Austria, New York, the father obtaining his first employ in this country from Barber & Sons, woolen manufacturers in that city.

Seven years later he again transferred his family to Wisconsin, settling on a farm 13 miles northwest of Milwaukee.

After one year of agricultural effort they returned to Auburn and the senior Wenzel again engaged with his former employers, remaining in their service about six years.

In 1864 the family came to Dorr, Allegan Co., Mich., where the homestead is still retained.

They were among its earliest pioneer settlers.

Mr. Wenzel operated as his father's assistant until he was 20 years of age, when he obtained a situation in a shingle-mill in the township of Dorr.

After pursuing this occupation some time, the manufacturing firm of Wenzel & Sons was established with the father at its head.

A year later the organization became Wenzel Brothers.

The partnership existed five years and its business transactions were managed chiefly in Ensley Township, Newaygo Co., Mich.

The firm dissolved in 1879, and in the spring of the following year Mr. Wenzel came to Osceola County and engaged in stocking a mill which was managed by his brother.

In the fall of 1882 the present association was instituted, which has since prosecuted the manufacture of lumber and shingles, and is doing an extensive business in hard-wood planing.

They have producing capacity for 40,000 feet of lumber daily, and 40,000 shingles, and they own 200 acres of timber land easily accessible from their works.

Mr. Wenzel is the individual owner of 11 improved lots in Le Roy village.

He was formerly a Republican, but is now an adherent of the Prohibition element.

He was married at Dorr, April 22, 1870, to Ellen Burke, and they have had four children: Harry F., who was born Feb. 8, 1873: Caroline R., Oct. 10, 1874; Irvin L., Dec. 22, 1877; and Albert, born April 18, 1880, who died July 9, 1881.

Mrs. Wenzel was born Oct. 15, 1852, in Medina Co., Ohio.

She is the daughter of Thomas and Betsey (Quinn) Burke, natives of Ireland, who emigrated to the United States after their marriage, and who located in the Buckeye State.

In 1867 they removed thence to Allegan Co., Mich., where the father died May 6, 1880.

The mother is still a resident there.

Mr. Wenzel holds the office of Trustee in the Baptist Church at Le Roy, and is Sunday-school Superintendent.

Isaac Grant

Isaac Grant, liveryman and proprietor of the Upton Avenue Mills, at Reed City, was born Jan. 25, 1846, near St. John's, Clinton Co., Mich., and is the son of Charles and Emmeline (Gillett) Grant.

His earliest known paternal ancestor, Ebsnezer Grant, was born in Scotland, at an unknown date.

Isaac Grant, son of the latter, was born April 4, 1760, in Goshen, Conn., and became a soldier in the Continental Army before he was 17 years of age, serving under "Mad" Anthony Wayne, and participating in the bayonet charge at the ford of Stony Point.

His command of 40 men were captured at Fort Washington and placed on the prison ship "Grosvenor" in New York Harbor.

The entire number were seized with smallpox.

A surgeon visited them and left a dose for each man.

All but four took the medicine and died.

Isaac Grant was one of the survivors.

After the close of the war he went to Lenox, Mass., and studied medicine.

He married Hannah Tracy, of that place, and settled at Colerain in the same State, removing later to Whitingham, Vt.

He went thence in 1801 to Chenango Co., N. Y., where he practiced his profession and was one of the founders of the first medical society of that county.

He continued a practitioner there until compelled by advancing years to withdraw from active life, and removed to Genesee Co., N. Y., and later to Albion, Mich., where he died Nov. 9, 1841.

His wife died Oct. 30, 1841, ten days preceding his own demise.

They had nine children.

Charles, fifth son and child, was born Oct. 2, 1794, in Colerain.

He was a drafted man in the war of 1812, and served throughout the contest.

He married Peggy Hines, March 26, 1816, and they had three children.

The first wife died, and Feb. r, 1831, he married Matilda Closs.

They became the parents of two children.

The mother died Aug. 26, 1833.

Mr. Grant was a third time married June 10, 1838, to Emmeline Gillett, and they had eight children.

Mr. Grant was reared on the home farm in Clinton Co., Mich.

He was 15 years of age when the Civil War stirred the patriotism of young and old, and he experienced from the first the common enthusiasm.

The fault of his youth was one that time was gradually and surely remedying, and he enlisted Oct. 3, 1863, at St. John's, as a private in Co. I, 10th Mich. Cav., Captain Ayres.

His command was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland and took part in the Stoneman raids, serving until Nov. 11, 1865.

Mr. Grant was a participant in 52 battles, of more or less importance.

On leaving the army he returned to Clinton County for a time, and removed thence to St. Louis, Gratiot Co., Mich., and there engaged in the flour and feed business, operating in that avenue at that point about two years.

In 1870 he went to Mount Pleasant, Isabella County, where he established himself in general trade.

A year and a half later he transferred his locality to Baldwin, Lake Co., Mich., and there pursued the same vocation for a year.

At the end of that time he entered a claim of 160 acres of land near Baldwin, where he located and commenced active operations.

In 1874 he was elected Sheriff of Lake County on the Republican ticket and served his term.

In 1880 he was reelected to the same position.

He also held other official positions, and officiated as President of the County Agricultural Association two years.

In February, 1883, he went to Chase, Lake County, and bought a livery stable, which he continued to manage until Sept. 3, 1883, the date of his sale of the property.

Sept. 9, he became the proprietor of his livery business.

His stables contain about a dozen horses on an average, and are fitted with necessary and suitable livery equipments.

He purchased his mills of T. V. Childs, in the fall of 1884 (current year).

They include saw, grist and planing mills, and are fitted with the best quality of modern appurtenances.

They derive a special value from their central location.

Mr. Grant is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, Post Stedman, No. 198, and he belongs also to the Sons of Industry.

He was married Oct. 25, 1868, at Salt River, Isabella County, to Daney Clark.

She was born Aug. 11, 1850, in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of Robert and Martha Clark.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Grant were born as follows: Rena M., May 11, 1870; Alda M., Aug. 29, 1873; Clark D., April 25, 1875; Howard, June 1, 1879; and Annie, May 11, 1881.

Mr. Grant is an active, enterprising man and possesses the quality and degree of business energy which guarantees the future solidity of Osceola County.

He is a fine specimen of physical manhood, is six feet one and a half inches in height and weighs 215 pounds.

 

Rev. John Farsberg, Pastor of the Lutheran Church located at Tustin, was born Nov. 9, 1834, in Sweden.

His father, Johan H. Farsberg, died when he was in early childhood, and thereafter, until the age of eight years, he was cared for by his mother, Christiana Farsberg, in the home of his maternal grandfather.

In 1842 he went to live with an uncle to be instructed in the business of a blacksmith, and later he worked as a puddler in a foundry.

When he was about 30 years of age he was appointed Government Inspector of the machine shops throughout the kingdom of Norway.

He spent one year in the traverse of the country in the discharge of the trust.

On the expiration of his commission in 1866, he came to the United States and remained about a year in the city of Chicago, where he obtained employment as an axle-filer in various carriage factories.

He became at the end of that time a missionary among his countrymen, and after laboring among them some months he returned to his trade as a mechanic, and operated three years in the manufacture of plows.

He went thence to Moline, Ill., where he officiated in the Lutheran ministry one year.

He went thence to Henry County in that State, and preached two years in the country.

In 1874 he returned to his former field in the city of Chicago, where he acted as a missionary about three years.

He next proceeded to Rock Island, Ill., and spent a year in study at the Swedish seminary, and at the close of his course was regularly ordained a minister.

In 1877 he took a final leave of his people in Illinois, and, answering to an urgent call from Osceola County, he located at Tustin.

On his arrival he found the society without organization or place of worship, and he at once entered vigorously into the work of remedying the deficiency.

He has organized churches of his faith at Tustin, Reed City, Cadillac, Hobart, Morley and Bounds' Mill, all of which are now included in his circuit save at Reed City.

At Tustin he has added 125 members to his society, and the membership over which he has charge, aggregates 500 in round numbers.

Since his arrival in Osceola County he has been instrumental in erecting five church edifices and a parsonage.

He has been indefatigable and unremitting in his parochial labors, and has often labored both day and night in his periods of effort.

He is an earnest and zealous promoter of the principles of the Republican Party.

Mr. Farsberg was married in 1866, in Norway, and three months after he came to Chicago, where his wife died six months later, leaving no child.

He was again married Dec. 26, 1878, in Chicago, to Betsey Kunoson, who was born Oct. 22, 1845, in Sweden.

She was well educated in her native land, and when 18 years of age came to Chicago with her parents, who went later to Minnesota, where they are farmers.

Mr. and Mrs. Farsberg have had four children, one of whom, John, is not living.

Those who survive are Antony W., Anna M. and Joseph T. Martin W. Westfall, proprietor of the hotel at Leroy which bears his name, was born April 17, 1843, in Lyons, Wayne Co., N. Y., and is the son of James and Elizabeth Westfall.

When he was 16 years of age, his parents removed from his native State to Lenawee Co, Mich., and settled at Hudson.

He took possession of a rented farm a year later, which he conducted several years, coming thence in August, 1866, to Osceola County.

He located on a farm and was one of the first settlers north of Reed City.

He lived on the place where he made a claim five years, and improved 20 acres.

Meanwhile, he operated on the road grade of the track of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, between Ashton and Leroy, and he "got out" 10,000 ties for the road.

Subsequently he bought out a man who was making preparations to erect a block-house hotel, but before his arrangements were complete he changed his plan and drew the lumber 12 miles for the building of a frame structure for the same purpose, which was the first building at Leroy.

He had a large number of boarders, chiefly railroad men, and at one time numbering nearly 100.

He has since built two structures for hotel purposes, the first having been consumed by fire.

In 1872 he took possession of the Westfall House, of which, together with three village lots, he is the proprietor.

He owns, besides, 80 acres of land under good cultivation, in Newaygo County.

Politically he adheres to the present principles of the Democratic Party.

He has been Treasurer of his township two years, and is present Village Marshal.

He was married Dec. 25, 1864, to Frances E. Fairchild.

She was born Oct. 12,1841, in Bath, Steuben Co., N. Y., and came with her parents to Hillsdale Co., Mich., when she was two years old.

 

Robert M. Westfall is an adopted child.

When 17 years old Mr. Westfall enlisted, enrolling as a soldier in the Union Army, Nov. 29, 1861, in the 27th N. Y. Inf., and was assigned to Co. B.

The regiment joined the Army of the Potomac, and was discharged in June, 1863.

Mr. Westfall participated in eleven battles and some minor skirmishes, escaping unhurt from battle casualties.

He took a severe cold which settled in his head and caused permanent loss of hearing.

Four of his brothers enlisted, and all escaped injury save two who received slight wounds.

 

Joseph Patterson, founder of the Osceola County Democrat, the pioneer Democratic journal published in Osceola County, and still its editor, was born April 26, 1855, in the township of Raisin, Lenawee County, Michigan.

He is the son of Hon. J. H. Patterson, member of the first Constitutional Convention of Michigan.

In 1866 the family removed to Jefferson, Cass County, Michigan.

Mr. Patterson received a good common-school education, supplemented by a thorough course of study at the High School at Kalamazoo where he graduated in 1879.

He subsequently studied law with Howell & Carr, attorneys at Cassopolis, Michigan, and in the spring of 1881 he was admitted to the Bar.

He removed to Evart in the fall of 1884, and founded the journal with which he is connected as owner and editor.

 

Ebenezer M. Braden, farmer on section 13, Leroy Township, is the proprietor of 80 acres of land lying adjacent to the village of Leroy and justly considered one of the most valuable places in the township in point of merit.

He was born Dec. 19, 1831, in Seneca . N. Y.

Louis Braden, his father, is a native of Seneca County, where he has spent his entire life, and is still a resident.

His mother, Electa (Moore) Braden, is a native of the same State.

Their family comprises nine children, all of whom are living.

The parents are each 76 years old, and are in fine health.

Mr. Braden is the oldest of his parents' children, five of whom reside in the State of New York, the remaining four being residents of Michigan.

He remained at home until he was 22 years of age, and was instructed in all the details of farm labor.

He was married in the winter of 1856, in Victor, Ontario Co., N. Y., to Mary S. Pound.

She was born in August, 1831, in the State of New York, and died Sept. 21, 1869, in Allegan Co., Mich., leaving four children, three of whom still survive her, Cornelia, Charles D. and Clarence A.; Frank is deceased.

Mr. Braden was a second time married April 19, 1871, in Texas Township, Kalamazoo Co., Mich., to Sarah A. Angell.

One child has been born of this marriage; Ewell L.

Mrs. Braden was born Nov. 30, 1838, in Galen, Wayne Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of James and Lucy (Tabor) Angell.

Her parents were natives respectively of Rhode Island and New Hampshire.

They came to Michigan in 1868, settling in Kalamazoo County.

They passed the closing years of their lives in the home of their daughter in Osceola County.

The father died July 12, 1879, the mother, April 28, 1877.

They had 10 children.

Mr. Braden removed his family to Leroy Town; ship May 6, 1873.

He operated as a saw-mill assistant three years, and in 1876 bought 80 acres of land on which he has since established himself as one of the leading farmers in this portion of the county.

He is a decided Republican, and has been Supervisor one year.

He is a Baptist in religious faith and connection.

 

Gideon A. Estes, merchant, formerly of the mercantile firm of Bevins & Estes, operating at Tustin, was born May 21, 1844, in Madison Co., N. Y.

His parents, John and Jane (Allen) Estes, were natives of the same State, and were of New England origin and English ancestry.

The latter died in her native State in 1849.

The father was a farmer and died in 1865, in Madison County.

Mr. Estes was under the protection of his father after the death of his mother until the decease of the former, soon after the son attained his majority.

The latter set out for Michigan and secured a homestead claim at the land office in Ionia, located in Leroy Township, Osceola County.

On turning his face toward the wilds of Northern Michigan, he found himself the possessor of a cash capital of 56 cents, wherewith to begin the world.

His surplus assets were his manhood's energy and determination to get on in the world, and his young wife.

On reaching section 28, Leroy Township, they found themselves in the depths of the wilderness, with no communication with the world at large save by the trails which temporary sojourners had made all over the county.

They made a clearing, erected a shelter and entered courageously upon the pains and pleasures of pioneer life, meeting success and comfort from the untried and almost trackless forest acres.

Mr. Estes labored assiduously, and at the date of his change of locality, his farm manifested the character of the labor and energy he had expended in its improvements and in a frame farm house, which was the work of his own hands.

In 1876 he sold the place to William Hooper, came to Tustin and formed a business relation with George W. Bevins, which continued to exist five years, and was altogether prosperous and satisfactory.

In 1881, Mr. Estes entered into the enterprise in which he has since operated, with gratifying results.

He is the owner of some valuable property at Grand Rapids, and also of several improved lots in Tustin.

Mr. Estes was the incumbent of nearly the entire list of local official positions while a resident in Leroy Township.

In political connection and opinion, he belongs to the National Greenback element.

He was married Jan. 15, 1867, in Madison Co., N. Y., to Lotta Lyon, who was born Aug. 24, 1844, in the same county where her parents lived and died.

She accompanied her husband to Osceola County, and aided him in the accomplishment of his pioneer plans in the township of Leroy.

She died May 28, 1878, at Tustin.

One of her two sons survives her, namely, Clayton, who was born June 18, 1875.

Clifford was born July 25, 1870, and died Jan. 31, 1875.

Mr. Estes was again married July 6, 1879, at Elkhart, Ind., to Mrs. Barbara N. (Dunn) Wellner.

She was born June 30, 1841, in Paisley, Scotland, where her father was a weaver.

She was about three years of age when the family emigrated to the United States, settling in Auburn, N. Y., where she was first married.

George W., elder son, is a resident of Buffalo. N. Y.; and John T. the younger, lives at Tustin.

With her husband, she is a member of the Baptist Church.

 

George W. Minchin, of the firm of Minchin Brothers, proprietors of the Evart Review, is a native of Michigan man born at Pontiac.

Born of humble parents who gained their living for themselves and family by hard labor, young Minchin soon had to begin to look around for himself; and in the fall of 1889.

After receiving a common-school education at Pontiac, he entered the printing-office of the Pontiac Bill-Poster, then owned by Wm. P. Nisbett, now of the Big Rapids Herald.

From office "devil” he rose to be foreman before the expiration of his apprenticeship.

In the spring of 1873 he left Pontiac to take the position of foreman in the Ludington (Mich.) Appeal office, founded at that time, and held that position over two years, when he resigned and went to Reed City, and accepted the position of local editor upon the Reed City Clarion, in the spring of 1875.

From here he went to Toledo, where he worked at his trade in the Commercial job-printing room for nearly two years.

Then, with his brother Jesse T., he purchased the Reed City Clarion from Mr. T. D. Talbot.

This they found in very bad condition, financially and otherwise, but succeeded in putting it upon a first-class footing,—upon equal standing with the best of country papers.

In September, 1879, Mr. Minchin received the commission of Railway Postal Clerk from the Government of the United States, which position he still holds, to the credit of both himself and the service.

Minchin Bros, sold the Clarion to Charles E. Barnes in 1880, and bought the Evart Review, George W. still retaining a half interest, while his brother continues as editor.

The latter is also President of the village of Evart.

Mr. George W. Minchin, the subject of the above outline, was married at Ludington, Sept. 14, 1880, to Miss Alice Bennett, of that city, and now has a pleasant home of his own at Evart.

 

Joseph H. Powell, farmer, section 6, Orient Township, was born April 13, 1840, in Pittsburg, Pa., and is the son of Ephraim and Catherine (Connor) Powell.

His father was born Oct. 31, 1806, and died Dec. 24, 1867.

His mother was born in May, 1810, and died in 1881.

Their deaths took place in the city of Pittsburg.

Mr. Powell lived in the place of his maturity until he was 20 years of age, when he went to Greenwood Township, Crawford Co., Pa., settling there in 1860.

He enlisted in the Union service Feb. 26, 1864, enrolling in Co. G, 14th Pa. Cav.

The command was assigned to Averill's Division in the Valley of the Shenandoah.

The first battle in which Mr. Powell was an active participant, took place May 15, 1864, at Newmarket.

He was again under fire June 5, at Piedmont.

June 16, he was engaged in a skirmish at Buchanan on the James River, and fought at Lynchburg on the two days following.

He was in action at Liberty on the 20th, and at Salem on the day thereafter.

The command came down the valley to Parkersburg, went thence to Martinsburg and advanced to Winchester, where it was engaged June 22, 23 and 24, after which it fell back across the Potomac at Williamsport and pursued General Imboden after he had burned Chambersburg, following him until he was driven from Virginia'.

General Sheridan succeeded to the command, and on the 17th of September, the battle of Acquia Creek was fought.

Two days later an engagement at Winchester took place.

On the 21st occurred the fight at Fisher Hill, and on the 23d Mr. Powell was wounded in the shoulder of the left arm, by a pistol shot at Mount Jackson.

He went thence to Port Republic, and from there was sent to the hospital at York, Pa. His recovery was speedy and he rejoined his regiment at Winchester.

He received his final discharge Aug. 17, 1865, and returned home to Crawford Co., Pa.

He resumed the occupation of farmer, operating as a laborer by the month and also as a renter.

In 1868, he determined to seek a later settled portion of the country, and accordingly made his way to Michigan, driving a horse-team through to Snow's Corners, Ionia County, reaching there April 20.

After a residence of one summer at that place, he came, Oct. 20, 1868, with his family, to Orient Township.

He had made a homestead claim on the Fourth of July previous, and in September made a clearing and built a log house, to which he removed his family on the day stated, arriving at their home after dark.

About 60 acres of the farm is now improved and cultivated, and a good frame house replaces the log cabin of the pioneer days.

Mr. Powell is independent in political views and favors the Prohibition element.

He was appointed Township Treasurer in 1873, and was elected to the office in the spring of 1874.

In the spring of 1876, he was elected Supervisor and was subsequently re-elected in 1877, and in 1880.

He acted six years as School Moderator.

His marriage to Catherine Carroll took place Feb. 26, 1860, in Pittsburg, Pa., and they have had three children: Margaret Ann was born Nov. 19, 1860, and was married July 4, 1881, to James McDonald; an unnamed infant died at the age of six months; Ephraim J. was born May 17, 1863.

Mrs. Powell was born Feb. 2, 1840, in Greenwood Township, Crawford Co., Pa., and is the daughter of William and Margaret (Brooks) Carroll.

Her parents died in Crawford County.

Mr. and Mrs. Powell are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

Charles M. Rich, civil engineer and lumberman, resident at Tustin, Burdell Township, was born Feb. 8, 1848, in Piscataquis Co., Maine.

He is the son of Charles W. and Albina S. (Kittredge) Rich, both natives of Massachusetts.

In 1864 they removed to Ohio, and are now living near the village of Elyria in the Buckeye State.

Mr. Rich went to that State five years previously, and during that time was in charge of his uncle, I. S. Metcalf, residing at Elyria, Lorain County.

He attended the Union School at that place until the removal of his parents to Lorain County, and after he was again an inmate of the parental household he continued his studies until he completed a full course and was graduated at the High School.

At the age of 21 he determined to acquire a practical knowledge of the profession of civil engineering, and to that end he devoted his time, working for a while for his board; but soon, by close application and diligence, secured positions of trust and profit.

Continuing in the service, he obtained employment on different engineering works in Ohio, Pennsylvania and Baltimore, Md., until the year 1876, the date of his removal to Tustin.

He came here primarily in the real-estate interest of his uncle, E. W. Metcalf, of Elyria, Ohio.

In the spring of 1877 he purchased 240 acres on section 24, Burdell Township, and in the same year he platted one-half of the village where he resides, locating 48 lots.

He has since made sale of nearly the entire number.

He is the proprietor of a fine residence in Tustin village, and owns 160 acres of land on section 26, in Burdell Township.

He has recently purchased 560 acres located on sections 2, 12 and 24 of the same township, and is operating as a lumberman and dealer in real estate in his own behalf.

Since his first removal to Michigan he has spent three years in Ohio in his professional capacity.

The marriage of Mr. Rich to Callie Meloy occurred Dec. 25, 1873, at New Lexington, Perry Co., Ohio.

They have one child—Wilder M.—born Aug. 9, 1884.

Mrs. Rich was born Sept. 23, 1848, in New Lexington, and is the daughter of William and Sophia (Thomson) Meloy.

Her father was born in Pennsylvania and was by vocation a cabinet-maker.

He was a man of prominent standing in Perry Co., Ohio, and during his life-time held several positions of responsibility and trust, among which were those of County Auditor and Treasurer.

He died in Perry County, in the fall of 1882, aged 73 years.

Her mother was born in Ohio and descended from German ancestors. She is still living, in Perry County, and is 64 years of age.

Mrs. Rich was carefully educated, and at the age of 18 years commenced teaching, which profession she pursued with success five years.

Politically, Mr. Rich is a Republican.

In religious preference he is a Presbyterian, while his wife adopts the tenets of the Baptist faith.

 

William H. Allen, lumberman at Evart, was born Dec. 3, 1837, in Ontario Co., N. Y.

His father, Albert A. Allen, was a native of the Empire State and was for some years 1 a minister of the Methodist Church.

He died in Holly, Oakland Co., Mich., Feb. 9, 1882, at 77 years of age.

William's mother, Laura (OySterbank) Allen, was born in May, 1806, in Green Co., N. Y., and is a member of the household of her son at Evart.

Three of six children of whom she became the mother are living,—Laura M., wife of Andrew Seeley, at Palmyra, N. Y.; Alpheus D., bookkeeper in Detroit; and William H.

Mr. Allen began to prepare for the vocation of machinist when he was 16 years of age.

In 1855 he came to Michigan, where he worked at his trade, and later conducted abstract business in the counties of Kent, Genesee and Muskegon.

He was one of the earliest to enlist in the service of the United States, entering the army of the Union in April, 1861, enrolling for three months under the first call for troops.

He became a member of Co. F, Second Mich. Vol. Inf., and soon after re-enlisted for three years, as a private.

He fought at the First Bull Run, at Fair Oaks, Williamsburg, Yorktown, Malvern Hill, in skirmishes without number and also served on detailed duty.

At the end of two years he was discharged, on account of ill health, at Philadelphia, and returned to Flint.

After working a short time at his trade, he went to Muskegon and operated in real-estate and abstract business.

Going thence to Big Rapids, he was employed two years as clerk in a drug store.

In 1870 he came to Evart and resumed his occupation of drug clerk, which he pursued about two years, meanwhile becoming interested in lumbering in the behalf of capitalists at Muskegon, buying timber and logs.

He has since been continuously engaged in the same line of business.

He is the owner of a residence and two lots at Evart, and of several tracts of farming land variously located in different parts of the county.

Mr. Allen was married Nov. 26, 1867, in Muskegon, to Sarah J. Dale.

They have two children, namely: William J., born Jan. 1, 1870, at Big Rapids, and Bessie C., born May 5, 1881, at Evart.

Mrs. Allen was born Oct. 9, 1840, in Monroe Co., Mich.

 

William Bellows, senior member of the law firm of Bellows & Stone, of Reed City, was born January 14, 1858, at Mishawaka, Indiana.

Charles Fitz Roy Bellows, his father, who lives at Ypsilanti, Michigan, was born November 29, 1832, near Bellows Falls, Vermont, a place founded and named by Col. John Bellows, a paternal ancestor of Mr. Bellows of this sketch.

The family is an old New England one, the first member of which, John Bellows, came from England in the year 1635, and his descendants were distinguished in Colonial matters and in the Revolutionary War.

In 1837, when five years of age, Mr. Bellows' father removed with his parents from Vermont to Michigan, making almost the entire journey in a pioneer wagon with ox team, and settled on Climax Prairie in Kalamazoo County, where his father made a large claim of land.

The grandfather of the Mr. Bellows of this sketch is still living, at the age of 85, on the land he located when he came to this State, still farming, having nearly 400 acres under a high order of cultivation.

His wife died on the farm, about the year 1866, leaving a large family, of which Charles F. R. Bellows was the oldest child and only son.

From the date of the removal of the family to Michigan, the boyhood of Charles F. R. Bellows was spent on the farm, employed in clearing and improving it in a then almost unsettled country, having but few advantages of society or schools, and leading the well-known life of the pioneer boy.

He afterward attended the college just established at Olivet, and the State Normal School, and, leaving the farm, entered upon the life of a teacher, successively at Constantine, Mishawaka and at Decatur.

At these places he was Principal of academies and graded schools, and devoted his entire time, not otherwise employed, in the study of mathematics, for which he had an unusual adaptation and faculty, enabling him to enter the advanced course in civil engineering at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

After graduating with honor at the University he continued teaching, and by his industry and ability has placed himself at the head of the profession which he has pursued since.

He is at present Professor of Mathematics in the State Normal School at Ypsilanti, a position he has filled for 18 years.

As an author of a number of text books on mathematics, and a lifelong teacher of wide acquaintance, he is well known as a leading educator of the State.

He has been prominent as well in political and journalistic circles, and founded the first Republican paper in Van Buren County.

He is a Mason of eminence, and in 1883 was the Grand Master of the State of Michigan.

The mother of Mr. Bellows was Julia E. Walker, whose family were early settlers in Oakland Co., Mich., and were also identified with the early growth of the State.

Being the son of a teacher, William E. Bellows enjoyed every advantage of education and training) being a pupil in the graded schools under his father's supervision and at the age of 12 years entering the State Normal School.

He was a member of the Classical Course until his graduation, in the class of 1877, being particularly proficient in mathematics and ancient languages, his especial delights, and the study of which he keeps up to the present time in his active professional life.

While in school he spent his summer vacations on the farm, encouraging a strong physical as well as mental growth.

In 1878, after teaching district schools several winters while finishing his course, he became Principal of the Union School at Saugatuck, Allegan Co., Mich., where he remained three years, and afterward assumed control of the graded schools at Allegan in the same capacity for two years.

As a teacher, he was practical, enthusiastic and devoted to thorough instruction and systematic management, and was held in high esteem by pupils and patrons.

At the age of 23 he began the study of law, at first during the leisure he could get from school work, and afterward in the law office of P. A. Latta at Allegan and Capt. E. P. Allen at Ypsilanti.

He was admitted to the Bar at Ann Arbor, in the Washtenaw Circuit, July 25, 1882, but continued teaching and the further prosecution of his legal studies until the spring of 1883, the date of his selection of Reed City as his field for the practice of his profession.

The formation of his present partnership relation was entered into a short time afterward, and the firm are already engaged in an extensive and prosperous practice.

Besides legal business proper, they deal extensively in real estate, solicit fire and life insurance and lend money.

As a young lawyer his industry and native ability are making an impression in the community, which is the source of much important and profitable business.

Mr. Bellows is a Republican in politics, born and bred, takes a deep interest in public affairs and is a rising man in local politics.

He did effective work in the campaign of 1884 in his county for the Republican ticket, and his services as a campaign and his services as a campaign speaker are appreciated.

He was married September 3, 1879, at Detroit, to Adelade E. Weir.

They are the parents of three children: Bertha C., born July 23, 1880, at Saugatuck; Lewis Fitz Roy, Feb. 11, 1882, in Allegan; and Florence A., born September 29, 1883, at Reed City.

Mrs. Bellows was born December 25, 1860, at Manchester, Washtenaw County, Michigan and is the daughter of Lewis H. and Susan Weir.

 

Peter Bittner, M. D., resident physician at Reed City, was born Jan. 17, 1850, at East Oxford Co., Ont.

He is the son of Henry and Mary (Alles) Bittner, and his father k is a prominent land-holder of Osceola County, having 200 acres in a fine agricultural condition in Richmond Township, and also is the proprietor of other tracts in the county, and of lots in the corporation of Reed City.

Dr. Bittner was reared on a farm and studied winters, attending school at Big Rapids and also at Grand Rapids.

At the age of 18 years he entered the office of Fred Wood, M. D., at Big Rapids and studied medicine under his instructions two years and three months.

Meanwhile he attended two full courses of lectures at Bellvue Medical College, N. Y., where he was graduated in the spring of 1871.

Immediately after, in April, he came to Reed City.

His father owned 280 acres of land, of which a plat of 120 acres is now in the city limits and known as " Bittner's Additions." (To the first, the second and third additions have since been made.)

These interests required the personal supervision of interested parties, and Dr. Bittner came here to attend to the accumulating business.

In 1872 he opened an office for the practice of his profession, which he prosecuted three years.

In 1874 he took charge of a Church of the Evangelical Association at Owosso, and officiated as its Pastor one year, going successively to Marshall, where he was occupied in a similar capacity one year, to St. Joseph two years, and to Lansing one year.

In 1879 he resumed his medical practice at Reed City, which he continued two years, and, at the expiration of that time, he assumed charge of a church at Ionia, Michigan, officiating there two years.

His health becoming impaired, he again returned to Reed City, where he is engaged in office practice and prescriptions.

In 1883, associated with his brother, Josiah Bittner, he built a mill-dam, situated on section 14, Richmond Township, and located on the Hersey River.

They built a flouring mill, with a capacity of 80 barrels of flour daily besides custom work.

The mill is fitted with 10 pairs of rollers and all modern improvements.

The brothers have a joint ownership in 40 acres of land, constituting the mill-site.

Mr. Bittner is the proprietor of the property where he resides, and 16 acres of land in village lots at Reed City.

He was married in Fredonia, Calhoun Co., Mich., Nov. 9, 1871, to Barbara Gutekunst.

Their seven children were born in the following order: Lidas H., Oct. 1, 1872; Lottie M., Jan. 19, 1874; Austin H., Dec. 6, 1875; Adolph, Sept. 28, 1877; Simon P., Sept. 15, 1879; Omar N., Aug. 24, 1881; Almira B., Nov. 9, 1883.

Mrs. Bittner was born Oct. 14, 1847, in Fredonia, Washtenaw Co., Mich.

 

J. F. Proctor, farmer, section 24, Hersey Township, was born Aug. 6, 1834, in Barton Township, Orleans Co., Vt.

He is the son of Dan and Augusta (Mason) Proctor.

His father was born Feb. 14, 1807, in Manchester, Eng., and emigrated to the United States in 1820.

He first located in Boston, Mass., and removed thence to Craftsbury, Orleans Co., Vt., setting up his business there as a blacksmith.

He owned a small farm in Michigan; whither he removed in 1849, and died Feb. 28, 1855, in Keene, Ionia County.

The mother was born in Craftsbury, Vt., Feb. 15, 1804, and died at the home of her son, Sept. 30, 1883.

Cynthia M., Alfred A., J. F., Helen E. and Benjamin Franklin, their five children, are all living.

Mr. Proctor was married soon after becoming of age, and settled in an unorganized portion of Montcalm Co., Mich., whence he removed, Jan. 1, 1856, to section 16, Crystal Township, together with his eldest brother.

They each made a claim of 40 acres of land, on which Mr. Proctor remained six years, and removed to North Shade, Gratiot Co., Mich.

Three years later he made another transfer of his home and family, to Hubbardston, Ionia County.

Not long afterward he embarked in the grocery trade at Matherlon, combining that business with hotel-keeping and conducting both about one year.

His venture proved disastrous, and as he suffered almost total loss of his resources except his ability to labor, he engaged as head-sawyer in the mill of Cogswell & Aldrich, with whom he operated in that capacity three years.

He next managed a saw-mill at Langston, Montcalm County, three years, and in the spring of 1872 he came to Hersey and operated as head-sawyer, scaler and foreman in the lumber camps of D. A. Blodgett.

In the spring of 1875 he took possession of the farm on which he has since pursued his agricultural interests, and he i also for some years continued the work of scaling, prosecuting that business eight winters.

He owns 120 acres of land, on which there was a small improvement when he took possession.

He has passed three winters near Harrison, Clare County, acting as foreman in the shingle-mill of D. F. Diggins, and removed his family there.

In the fall of 1863 Mr. Proctor was drafted into the Union service from Gratiot County, but on reporting at Corunna, Shiawassee County, was released being the only dependence of his widowed mother.

The law was afterward changed, and he determined to enlist, as he considered the prospects of his being again drafted were more than likely to be realized.

He decided to enroll in the Third Michigan Infantry.

On meeting the recruiting officer at Pewamo, he stated his circumstances, his large family, and the necessity of his presence to secure their well-being.

The officer informed him that he could enlist him and administer the oath in such cases made and provided, give him custody of his papers, and should he be drafted he could report for duty to the regiment as an enlisted man.

He escaped the draft, and the necessity never arose.

Mary W. (Smith) Proctor

Mr. Proctor was married Sept. 16, 1855, to Mary W. Smith, and they have eight living children, and four deceased.

Fred was born Jan. 21, 1857, Frank, March 7, 1858; Charlie, January 5, 1860; Dan, August 25, 1861; Viola, April14, 1863; (died March 19, 1864; Clyde, born Jan. 12, 1865, died May 13, May 13, 1882; Louisa was born April 11, 1867; Willie, March 17, 1870; Ralph, Feb. 28, 1872 (died March 3rd following); Verne, born May 13, 1873, died Sept. 24 of the same year; Arthur C. was born Sept. 25, 1875; Albert E., April 11, 1877.

Mrs. Proctor was born May 23, 1833, in Novi, Oakland Co., Mich., and is the oldest of four children born to her parents.

She has one brother and two sisters —Edgar, Abigail R. and Emily.

Her father and mother, A. C. and Lorinda (Simmons) Smith, reside at Easton, Ionia County, where the former is a citizen of prominence.

He has served several terms as Sheriff, and has been County Surveyor some years.

Mr. Proctor is present Supervisor (1884) of his township. In political opinion he is a Democrat.

His paternal grandfather was in somewhat straitened circumstances in England, and, leaving his family there, all save his oldest son, he set out with him in a sailing vessel for the United States.

Adverse winds drove them into the Northern Ocean among the icebergs, where their food gave out and they were in danger of starvation as well as shipwreck.

But other vessels in the same vicinity, with more abundant stores, shared with them, and after six months of storm and stress they landed in Nova Scotia.

The senior Proctor was a blacksmith and moreover was bent on proceeding to the United States, but was deterred by an English law enacted after the war of 1812, prohibiting mechanics belonging by nativity to Great Britain from going to the States.

He fixed his location as near the boundary line as he could, and undercover of becoming a permanent settler he took up 200 acres of land, on which he settled and commenced active life as a blacksmith.

After a year he succeeded in getting on board an American sloop with his tools, but he was discovered by the British authorities and all the most valuable portion of his equipment was confiscated, leaving him only the commonest sort of an outfit to commence his work of carving out ways and means to secure the comfort and presence of his family.

A month later he succeeded in his purpose and reached Boston.

He went thence to Lowell, in the Old Bay State, where he produced the first lace-making machinery in this country.

His maternal grandmother, Mrs. Mason, was a descendant of the Howards, whose names are associated with the earliest colonial history of Massachusetts.

His grandfather, Elder Mason, was the first Baptist clergyman in Craftsbury, Vt.

At the date of his settlement there, the most primitive methods of travel prevailed, and he once drew his wife on a hand-sled nearly 58 miles, she carrying in her arms their oldest child.

That of Mr. Proctor is especially valuable to this volume, as he represents the elements on which this country was founded and which has perpetuated its institutions.

He is a pioneer by inheritance and in his own experience.

 

Isaac W. Howe, M. D., practicing physician at Ashton, Lincoln Township, and a prominent resident in that vicinity, was born in Potter Co., Pa., May 8, 1835, and attended the common school until about 19 years of age.

He then began the study of medicine in his native county, under Dr. Willard Whitney, and applied himself to his chosen studies with great assiduity.

In due time he became qualified to pursue his calling successfully.

In the fall of 1868, he came to Michigan, resided in Wayland, Allegan County, about a year, and then came to Osceola County, locating in Lincoln Township about half a mile west of Ashton.

It was his intention to engage in mercantile business, and he sold the first goods in the township.

About a year afterward he went to Lake County, this State, and took possession of 80 acres of land, under the provisions of the homestead laws, in Ellsworth Township.

After residing there until the spring of 1879, he returned to Ashton, where he has since resided and followed the practice of his profession.

He has erected a fine residence, which he now occupies.

Besides the 80 acres of land which he owns in Lake County, he also owns some village property at Ashton.

In regard to religion, the Doctor, as well as his wife, is a member of the Baptist Church, and has been a devoted worker for the cause of Christianity for 26 years.

He is a Republican in his political views; has held the office of Township Treasurer in Lake County for a year and a half, resigning that office on account of being elected Sheriff of that county.

This office he had two years; was also Under-Sheriff four years, and Superintendent of the Poor of the same county for a term.

Dr. Howe was married in Potter County, in his native State, Jan. 18, 1855, to Miss Emeline Harvey, who was born in Tioga Co., N. Y., Feb. 16, 1834.

Her parents, Joel and Polly (Gee) Harvey, were also natives of the same county.

The children in the family of Dr. Howe have been Florence D., Iva G. and Elmer W.

The first mentioned died when a year and eight months old.

The Doctor's father, William Howe, was a native of the Empire State, and his mother, Abigail, nee Kibbie, of the State of Massachusetts.

 

L. B. Winsor, attorney, member of the law, real-estate and insurance firm of Cooper & Winsor, at Reed City, was born Jan 24, 1858, in Providence, R. I.

His father, James A, W. Winsor, was born Aug. 31, 1813, in Rhode Island, and married Ann C. Chillson, who was born Nov. 12, 1817, near Elmira, N. Y.

Three of their seven children are still living.

When Mr. Winsor was about five years of age his parents became residents of Hillsdale, Mich.

On reaching suitable age he became a student at the college there, studying in the scientific course, and was graduated in the spring of 1877.

He entered the Law Department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, immediately after terminating his course at Hillsdale, and was graduated in 1879.

He had previously acquired a fundamental knowledge of law in the office of Dickerman & St. John, of Hillsdale, Mich.

In the fall of 1880 he came to Reed City, where he became an associate with Ransom Cooper, and their business relations are still in existence.

They have established a satisfactory practice in the legal profession, and represent the Liverpool & London & Globe Fire Insurance Company, the Phoenix, Orient, British American and American.

In the spring of 1880 Mr. Winsor was elected City Attorney, and has been successively re-elected to the same position.

He is connected by membership with the Masonic fraternity, and belongs to Blue Lodge, No. 363, at Reed City, to Royal Arch Chapter, No. 112, at Reed City, and to Pilgrim Commandery, No. 23, at Big Rapids.

 

Walter M. Davis, dealer in boots, shoes, harness, furniture, etc., at Evart, was born in Washington Township, Macomb Co., Mich.

His father, Stephen H. Davis, was born in the State of New York and is an early settler of Macomb County.

He is engaged in the sale of agricultural implements at Romeo in that county.

His mother, Sarah Maria (Scott) Davis, is a native of the State of New York.

They are the parents of nine children.

At the age of 18 years, which period of his life he had passed on his father's farm, Mr. Davis went to Ray, in his native county, to prepare for the business of a harness-maker.

He served a period of three years, and in 1868 he opened a shop for the transaction of business in that avenue at Ray, which he conducted two years.

In October, 1871, he came to Evart, accompanied by his brother—Henry A. Davis —and they erected buildings beside each other for the prosecution of their respective enterprises—-harness-making and the sale of furniture.

The death of H. A. Davis occurred in December, 1878, and, in company with M. C. Williams, the surviving brother purchased the stock of furniture, becoming sole owner three years later by purchase.

His business has continued to expand, and he has increased its connections by the addition of boots and shoes, and also keeps a full line of undertaker's goods.

He also owns a hearse. Mr. Davis owns the building in which he established his business primarily, which is 20 x 62 feet in dimensions, rents the structure built by his brother, which exceeds his own in size, and also occupies a large store house opposite, 20 x 80 feet in size.

He erected the building in which the post office at Evart is located and where he formerly operated. His stock in the various departments of his business averages a value of $10,000.

He owns his village property, consisting of a house and three lots, and also a 50-acre farm situated adjoining the village of Sears.

Mr. Davis is a member of the School Board and is the present Village Treasurer, in which position he is serving his seventh term.

He was married in Grand Rapids to Elizabeth Wolf, a native of the city of Buffalo, N. Y.

Their children were born in Evart as follows: Earl S , June 12, 18811 , and Glenn S., Sept. 23, 1883.

Politically he is an out and out Republican.

 

Charles K. Edwards, farmer, section 20, Orient Township, was born Jan. 29, 1846, on the Isle of Wight.

His father, John Edwards, was born Nov. 9, 1803, in Wales, and is of mixed English and Welsh origin.

He married Elizabeth Kinver, a lady of English birth, born in 1793, and in 1855 emigrated with his family to Oakwood, Victoria Co., Ont., where he is now living, in advanced age.

The mother died there June 3, 1877.

Mr. Edwards was educated in the public schools of Victoria County chiefly, and was sent for a few months to a school of higher grade.

He was reared to manhood on a farm, and, on obtaining his majority, rented a farm in the vicinity of his boyhood's home, which he conducted two years.

Soon after he determined to test the rumored advantages of the Peninsular State, and in December, 1870, he came to the township of Orient, where he made a homestead claim of 40 acres of land, to which his family removed in March, 1871.

He has made a later purchase of 60 acres additional, and of the whole has improved 50 acres; has also erected a frame barn of good quality, and suited to the increasing demands of his farm.

On coming to Orient Township, Mr. Edwards drove an ox team from Lake Station on the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad, which then terminated there, and worked between seven and eight days to cut a road to his present place of residence.

He was married Jan. 29, 1867, to Mary E. Toole.

She was born Feb. 24, 1845, in Oakwood, Ont., and is the daughter of William and Finette (Pillen) Toole.

The former is a native of Pennsylvania and is of American birth and Irish and German descent.

He was born in December, 1814, and is living in Oakwood, Ont.

Her mother was of German extraction, born in Portland, Ont., and died in Oakwood, Jan. 24, 1869, aged 47 years and four weeks.

The children bom to Mr. and Mrs. Edwards are recorded as follows: Finette S., born Oct. 5, 1869; William W., May 28, 1872; Cecil W., June 27, 1874 (died by accidental drowning May 19, 1877); Sidney J., June 28, 1876; Clarence B., Dec. 3, 1878; and Percy B., Sept. 2, 1882.

Mr. Edwards is an adherent and sustainer of the principles of the Republican Party.

He served a vacant term as Justice of the Peace, and was elected to the position twice successively, discharging its incumbent duties 11 years.

He has been Highway Commissioner three years.

School Inspector five years and Moderator three years.

Mrs. Edwards belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

Andrew C. Adams, merchant at Ashton, was born in Erie Co., Pa., Nov. 22, 1844.

His father, Elijah Adams, was a native of the State of New York; and his mother, Eunice, nee Van Tassel, was born in Pennsylvania.

Andrew received a good common-school education until he was 16 years of age, when, Aug. 31, 18611, his patriotic ardor led him to enlist in the service of the Government for the suppression of the great insurrection and for the common weal of his country.

He joined the Eighth Mich. Vol. Inf. and served four years, during this period being a participant in at least 20 general engagements, and came out of them all without having received a "scratch”, of injury!

He was honorably discharged from the service, after the close of the direful contest, and until 1875 he was employed in different saw and shingle mills in various parts of this State.

He then came to Ashton and engaged in mercantile business, where he has since continued.

His store is a fine one and would do credit to a much larger place.

He has a complete stock of general merchandise and is enjoying a good patronage and fair success every way.

On the 13th of February, 1884, his store took fire, and the building, with the contents, was entirely consumed; not even his books were saved.

The loss was estimated at $2,000 over all insurance.

But he is not the man to be discouraged in life's noblest ambitions by disaster.

As sure as he continues to have average health and strength, he will be industrious and economical, and begin again to accumulate.

Mr. Adams has held the office of Township Treasurer six years, also the positions of School Director and School Assessor, and in the winter of 1883 he was appointed Notary Public.

In his principles concerning national government he is identified with the Republican Party.

He was married at Wayland, Allegan Co., Mich., Jan. 1, 187 1, to Augusta E. Dillabough, a native of Canada.

There are two children in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Adams, namely, Frederick C. and Robert E.

 

John Witt, farmer, section 22, Lincoln Township, is a son of Lui and Catherine Witt, natives of Germany, where also John was born, Nov. 14, 1840.

When 24 years of age he emigrated to England and thence to Canada, living one year in Quebec and spending one summer in Detroit.

He came to this county in 1864 and took possession of 80 acres of land under the provisions of the homestead law, since which time he has added 80 acres more.

One-half of his whole landed estate he has in a condition of good cultivation, and upon the premises he has erected a fine dwelling, also good barns, etc. Indeed, they are among the best in the county: Politically, Mr. Witt is a Republican, and in a public capacity he has served his fellow citizens as School Assessor.

He was married at Big Rapids, Mecosta Co., Mich., June 4, 1871, to Miss Matilda Morty, a native also of Germany.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Witt are Ida, born March 13, 1873; Agnes, June 2r, 1874, and died Dec. 9, 1875; Ella, July 13,1877; Matilda, Jan. 30, 1880; Otto, Dec. 3t, 1881; and Paul, March 1 1, 1884.

 

Henry W. Carson, better known to his generation as "Kit Carson," proprietor of the hotel and boarding-house at Sears, Orient Township, was born Nov. 3, 1837, in Yates Township, Montgomery Co., N. Y.

His father, Stephen Carson, is deceased. He died Dec. 7, 1883, aged 85 years.

The mother, Elizabeth (Williams) Carson, is living in Crawford Co., Pa., where her husband died, and is 75 years old.

The family went to that section of Pennsylvania in 1852, where the father engaged in farming.

In earlier life he was a carpenter.

Mr. Carson was 15 years of age when he went to the Keystone State with his parents.

Sept. 23, 1865, he came to Genesee Co., Mich., and located at Clio, where he spent seven years engaged as a lumber manufacturer. He built four saw-mills at Clio, Genesee County.

Later on he removed to Osceola County, arriving Sept. 2, 1871, and locating at Big Lake, two miles south of Sears.

He built two miles of railway with iron track, running from Sears to Big Lake, for facilitating lumber manufacture and transportation.

It was the first piece of locomotive railroad constructed by a single individual in the United States, and was designated the "Orient, Big Lake & Chippewa Road."

Mr. Carson operated it five and a half years.

At the end of that time he sold out and located on his farm for a time, while he was building a saw-mill between Loomis and Coleman.

Six months after its completion he sold it, and in 1879 built a mill at Chippewa, which he managed a year.

On disposing of that he again resided for a time on his farm which had been occupied by his family since their removal to the county.

In 1880 he established a lumber yard at Harrison, which he conducted 20 months, and lost the property by fire, which entailed a loss of $1,000.

He then built a mill at Big Lake, which he managed three months and sold.

His next venture was the renting of the hotel which he is now conducting.

When he first came to Sears in 1871 it contained six buildings, five of them engaged in the sale of liquor.

Mr. Carson is a Republican in political principles and connections.

He has officiated as School Director and Highway Overseer.

He is everywhere known as "Kit Carson,'' all his social and business correspondence being addressed to him under that style.

He was married April 27, 1863, in Crawford Co., Pa., to Melvina Collins, and they have had five children: Minnie E., who was born April 14, 1865, in Crawford Co., Pa., married Frank Jeffs, Dec. 7, 1881; Alice M. was born Sept. 15, 1867; Laura M., Dec. 21, 1870; Henry H., May 27, 1878, in Orient, and died June 15, following; Mattie E., Sept. 3, 1879.

Mrs. Carson is the daughter of John P. and Abigail (Robinson) Collins.

The former was born Jan. 21, 1820, in Pennsylvania, and resides in Crawford County in that State.

Her mother was born in 1823, in the State of New York, and died July 29, 1869, in Crawford County.

Mrs. Carson was born Sept. 23, 1847, in the county where she was reared, and is one of nine children born to her parents, four sons and five daughters.

 

Frank H. Nix, photographer at Reed City was born March 29, 1854, in Fulton Co., New York.

His parents, Frederick and Hattie (Heidner) Nix, are natives of Prussia, where the former was born Feb. 26, 1818, the latter in 1826.

The father resided in West Bend, Wis., where the mother died, in 1865.

Four of their eight children are living, namely: Emuel, who is a farmer near Mitchell, Dakota; Theodore, who is a photographer at Evart; and Lizzie, who is the wife of Henry Lenn, Principal of Schools at Oshkosh, Wis.

Mr. Nix was a farmer until the age of 16, when he came to Michigan and engaged as a salesman at Manistee for George Nungesser, general dealer in merchandise, continuing in that employment five years.

He then came to Cadillac and became interested in the book and stationery business; a year later he came to Reed City, and opened the business of a photographer on a small scale.

He has now a fine gallery and an extensive business.

Mr. Nix is a member of the Order of Odd Fellows and of the Patriarchal Circle.

He was married at Cadillac, Mich., Nov. 7, 1873, to Sarah F. Baker.

She was born Feb. 4, 1852, in Decatur, Mich.

Their children were born as follows: Edwin, Nov. 28, 1874; Harry E., Oct. 2, 1876; and Mabel A., June 16, 1880.

Mr. Nix owns his residence, which he built, and other village property.

He and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

William A. Higbe, of the real-estate firm of J. M. Reed & Co., resident at Reed City,was born Jan. 20, 1854, in Newark Valley, N. Y.

Charles Higbe, his father, is a prominent farmer of Newark Valley; he was born in the State of New York, in August, 1816.

William's mother, Caroline (Lincoln) Higbe, was born in November, 1820.

At the age of 18 years Mr. Higbe entered the Wyoming Seminary at Kingston, Pa., and after two years of study was graduated in the business department.

He engaged as a clerk in Newark, and operated in that capacity until 1876.

In 1856 his father made a hunting tour through Northern Michigan, and, judging favorably of the outlook, he formed the association since known to business circles as "J. M. Reed & Co.," with J. M. Reed (after whom the city is named), Ozias J. Slosson, F. H. Todd and himself as members.

They made claims including about 4,000 acres of land, most of which seemed and proved favorable for agriculture.

Mr. Todd is deceased, and his interest lapsed to his associates.

Mr. Slosson is also deceased, and his sons—Willis M. and Arthur—inherit his claim.

Mr. Higbe represents his father, and is a heavy owner in his own behalf.

The firm platted a considerable amount of the territory they held, including the main portion of the town and J. M. Reed & Co's First Addition.

They still hold a large amount of farming land and village property on sale.

In 1882 Mr. Higbe built Higbe's Opera House Block at Reed City, a brick structure 55 x 80 feet in extent, with two business apartments on the ground and Opera House above.

Mr. Higbe is associated with T. W. Adams, of Big Rapids, in the management of the "Northern Michigan Theatrical Circuit," including the towns of Big Rapids, Stanton, Reed City, Cadillac and Manistee, and they control the places of amusement in those towns.

Mr. Higbe owns his residence and considerable other village, property.

In company with L. B. Avery, he built the skating rink at Reed City, a building 52 x 120 feet in dimensions, with a solid maple floor in excellent condition.

He was married July n, 1876, in Newark Valley, to Emma, daughter of John Butler.

She was born in Tioga Co., N. Y., Nov. 22, 1857.

One child; Eugenia, was born April 1, 1877, to Mr. and Mrs. Higbe.

 

Joseph A. Braden, farmer and teacher, residing at Leroy, was born July 11, 1840, in Seneca Co., N. Y., and is the son of Lewis and Electa (Moore) Braden (see sketch of E. M. Braden).

He obtained his elementary education in his native county, and in the spring of 1866 came to Texas Township, Kalamazoo Co., Mich., and became interested in farming.

He remained there until his removal in 1875 to Osceola County.

He engaged in the employ of Kellogg, Sawyer & Co., for a time, and in 1878 he purchased 80 acres of land lying within the corporation of the village of Leroy, nearly all of which is under improvement.

Mr. Braden obtained a thorough education and preparation for the teacher's profession at Kalamazoo.

He began to teach in 1860, and has for some years made it his business in the winter seasons.

He became a soldier in the Union service during the war of the rebellion, enlisting April 30, 1861, in Co. D, 27th Reg. N. Y. Inf., under Col. Slocum.

His command was assigned to the Army of the Potomac, and he was a participant in the first battle of Bull Run and in all the engagements of the McClellan campaign.

He passed through his period of service uninjured and received an honorable discharge at Elmira, New York in June, 1863, having won the earnest esteem and appreciation of his comrades and officers.

He is a republican in political principle and record.

His marriage to Lucy Angel too place March 23, 1864, in Galen County, New York.

They have had two children, James L. and Adriance.

The latter is not living.

Mrs. Braded was born March 20, 1845, in Wayne County, New York.

 

Elias Smith Richardson, M. D., practicing physician and surgeon at Reed City, was born April 11, 1842, in Kent Co., Ont.

His grandfather, Edward Richardson, was a pioneer of Michigan, and died in Detroit in 1810, where he was in the hotel business.

After his death, his family removed to the homestead in Kent Co., Ont.

Isaac M. Richardson, the father of Dr. Richardson, was born July 2, 1805, in Detroit, and died in May, 1882, near St. Charles, Saginaw Co., Mich.

The mother, Mary A. (Smith) Richardson, was born in 1813, in Niagara Co., Ont., and died in 1865, in Oakland Co., Mich.

Their family comprised 14 children, eight of whom survive.

Dr. Richardson is the eighth of his parents' children in order of birth.

He was reared on a farm and obtained a fair education, which he utilized in the profession of teaching, engaging in that vocation five years and attending the union school at Pontiac between the terms of labor.

In October, 1868, he entered the Medical Department of the University at Ann Arbor, where he was graduated with the class of 1870.

On obtaining his credentials he opened an office at Pontiac as preliminary to a medical career.

After a trial of six months he decided on a change of locality and went to the Saginaw Valley, operating in that region four years.

Becoming convinced of the deleterious effects of the malarial climate, another change of location was inevitable, and Dr. Richardson, in 1874, fixed upon Osceola County as a desirable field for his business, and also to re-establish the vigor he had lost in the miasmatic climate of the Saginaw region.

He began his practice at Evart, removing thence in 1876 to Reed City and established himself permanently as a practitioner.

He is the oldest resident physician at that point, and has secured a substantial recognition of the genuineness of his merits in his professional capacity; and by his conscientious discharge of duty, his abilities and skill, and his character as a cultivated, self-respecting gentleman he has won the confidence which is the crown of his manhood.

He possesses traits of decision and independent judgment which place him beyond the pale of modern empirics, and he repudiates the pretensions and criminal tendencies of the schools of quackery in medical practice with all the disgust and contempt which are their inherent and fundamental deserts.

In 1873 Dr. Richardson was made a member of the State Medical Society of Michigan, and in 1883, by special invitation, attended the American Medical Association at Cleveland.

He was at one time a regular correspondent of the Medical Summary, and is still an occasional contributor to its columns.

He is a member of the Union Medical Society of Northern Michigan; and belongs to the Reed City Lodge, No. 316, I. O. O. F.

He has officiated five years as Meteorological Observer in behalf of the State Board of Health, and two years as Observer for the United States Signal Service.

Dr. Richardson has been County Physician one year, and has officiated two years as Coroner.

He was married Sept. 1, 1869, in Romeo, Macomb Co., Mich., to Clarinda M. Waugh, and they have four children: Merari A., who was born June 15, 1870, in Pontiac; Judson E., July 29, 1872, in Saginaw; Clare VV., Dec. 22, 1877, at Reed City, where also Don Dio was born, Feb. 24, 1881.

Mrs. Richardson was born July to, 1841, in Bloomfield, Oakland Co., Mich., and is the daughter of Sheldon and Charlotte Waugh.

Her parents came from New York to Bloomfield in 1825, where they joined the pioneer agricultural element.

Her father died Aug. 18, 1874, at Pontiac; her mother is yet living, in Oakland County.

The period through which the country was passing during the later youth of Dr. Richardson and which awoke in him a conscientious interest, shaped his convictions on general topics after radical methods.

He was a staunch Republican from the outset of his active political career, and also of decided temperance principles.

He believed politics to be the medium to secure redress from all immoral grievances, and felt compelled to change his convictions regarding the integrity of the pretentions of the Republican Party concerning prohibition of the liquor traffic.

Accordingly, in December, 1860, associated with others of similar opinions, he organized a Prohibition Club for the purpose of awakening a local interest in the matter.

After the organization of the Union party at Jackson, Jan. 9, 1884, he moved that the club adopt its principles and operate in harmony with its object.

At the first local election thereafter a temperance ticket was put in the field, which was defeated by the joint action of the Democrats and Republicans.

The indignation, disgust and contempt of Dr. Richardson over this result led him to the renunciation of the old party and to become its bitter opponent in all its temperance pretensions.

 

Nelson A. Ferguson, farmer, section 6, Orient Township, was born Sept. 9, 1828, in Chautauqua Co., N. Y.

His father, Michael Ferguson, was born in Schoharie Co., N. Y., and was chiefly engaged in agricultural pursuits during his life. His wife, Eunice (Packard) Ferguson, was a native of the State of New York, and of Scotch and Welsh lineage.

In 1830 they removed with their three children to Marion Co., Ohio; there they bought a farm, which was their abiding place for a time.

Later they went to Lucas County in that State, coming thence about 1848 to Ionia Co., Mich., where father and son settled on a farm in Ronald Township.

The mother died in that township in March, 1861, aged 76 years.

The death of the father occurred in Fairfield, Montcalm Co., Mich., in 1870.

He was 88 years of age.

Mr. Ferguson, the subject of this sketch, was reared to the vocation of his father.

He was married May 25, 1847, in Ohio, to Anna E. Jones. She was born near Lebanon, Ohio, in 1831, and is the third child of Samuel B. and Eliza (Peterson) Jones.

The latter was born in Pennsylvania, 'and died in 1848, in Henry Co., Ohio.

The former is a resident of Bushnell, Montcalm Co., Mich.

He was born in 1797, in New Jersey. His family included four sons and three daughters.

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson were named Waterman, Walter, Perry A., Franklin P., Emma J., Flora J., Eva E., Georgianna, Henry A., Nelson E. and Fred E. Nine children yet survive.

Mr. Ferguson became a soldier during the Civil War, enlisting in Co. A, 21st Mich. Vol. Inf.

He was in action only at the battle of Perryville, in which he encountered a degree of hardship which completely exhausted his endurance.

On the second night after the engagement he was seated in a chair near a fire, and becoming unconscious from over-fatigue he fell, and was so badly burned as to cause his discharge from the service.

He is a Democrat in political connections.

He officiated three years as Superintendent of the Poor, nearly five years as Supervisor, several terms as Justice of the Peace, two terms as School Inspector and one term as Township Treasurer.

He removed to his present location in Orient Township Dec. 12, 1868, and made a homestead claim of 40 acres of land, on which he has since resided.

Winfield Scott Gerrish

Winfield Scott Gerrish, deceased, son of the Hon. N. L. Gerrish, of Cadillac, and brother of Mrs. Rose Quigley, of Evart, was born Feb. 15, 1849, in Lee, Penobscot 1 Co., Maine.

He was early trained in the details of the lumber business in all its branches, his father being engaged in that business in Maine during his early boyhood.

In 1857 he accompanied his parents to Wisconsin, whence, in 1861, they removed to Croton Township, Newaygo Co., Mich.

Hon. Nathaniel L. Gerrish, now of Cadillac, was born in Dover, Maine, Feb. 16, 1819.

He grew to manhood amid the influences of the leading industry of the Pine Tree State, and was a born and bred lumberman, passing his entire life thus far in the various avenues of that branch of business.

He was married Feb. 12, 1843, in Lee, Penobscot Co., Maine, to Caroline Gatchell, and they became the parents of four sons and three daughters, namely: Ebenezer W., Rose A. (Mrs. Quigley), Winfield Scott, Leslie F., Mary A., Abner H. and Esther C.

 

The son, W. S., when 12 years of age, was in strong and active boyhood, eager to begin his share in the work of the world, and, with his inherited tastes and inclinations, was trained by association and circumstances in the business to which his father devoted his life and ambitions.

Young Gerrish was primarily educated in the public schools, and in 1864, when 15 years old, was sent to Grand Rapids, to the academy, where he remained one season, receiving meanwhile an appointment as cadet in the naval school at Annapolis.

He matriculated there in 1865, but, finding the career of a midshipman distasteful and irksome, with his father's approval he abandoned the position at the end of his first year, and returned to Michigan to enter upon an active business career as a lumberman.

He was 18 years old in the winter of 1867, and during that season he began operations as a lumberman on his own responsibility, and took a contract to "put in logs" on the Muskegon, along which line he operated during the remainder of his life.

In 1869 he settled at Hersey, where he was a resident eight years.

In the autumn of 1873, he made an extensive logging contract with Messrs. Avery & Murphy, to put in a large amount of logs on the Tom and Dock Creeks, in which he experienced difficulties of an unusual character, chief of which was the shrinking of the streams to the proportions of a rivulet, an obstacle which required the building of dams and draining of lakes to raise the creeks to a height necessary for the accomplishment of the business.

The terms of the contract were finally fulfilled, and the reputation Mr. Gerrish won for perseverance under embarrassments that would have daunted and baffled men of larger experience, was of infinite value to his future career.

John L. Woods, the veteran developer of the lumber interests of the north of Michigan, becoming interested in the pluck and perseverance of the young lumberman, and recognizing the value of his predominating traits of character, made him a proposition to take an interest in a tract of 12,000 acres owned by him on the upper waters of the Muskegon, which he accepted, believing it to be the opportunity of his life, and which he afforded a broad field for the exercise of his abilities.

IR In 1874, associated with E. H. Hazel ton and others, he purchased a large tract of timber land in town 18 north, 5 west, Clare Co., Mich., a location considered practically worthless for lumbering, as it lay remote from the river.

While attending the Centennial at Philadelphia, in 1876, he observed in Mechanics' Hall a small Baldwin locomotive, whose operations suggested to his practical mind its feasibility as an accessory to the achievement of a lumber project in Clare County.

A vivid picture of a horse that could draw logs without snow painted itself on his imagination, and he returned home with perfected plans for the accomplishment of the enterprise.

In January, 1877, the first logging railroad in the United States was built, and connected Lake George in town 18, 5, with the Muskegon River, a distance of six miles.

Within the following year the road was extended.

During the first year it was operated, the "put" was 20,000,000 feet; with the new facilities in 1879 the “put“ reached a maximum of 114,000,000.

In the spring of that year Gerrish & Woods bought an interest in the Hamilton mill at Muske_ gon, where the former fixed his residence in 1880.

Mr. Gerrish, within that year, purchased a share of the Wilson mill at Muskegon and continued to hold a proprietary interest in several shingle-mills.

In 1880, also, he made a purchase of the Saginaw Bay & Northwestern Logging Railroad, buying the route in company with W. J. Miller. During the next two years the firm transported 90,000,000 feet of logs annually on its track.

In 1879 Mr. Gerrish passed the most active year v of his business career.

He banked and put into the Muskegon River 130,000,000 feet, and in the year following put in 100,000,000 feet.

During these two years he was recognized as the champion individual logger of the world.

The maximum number of men employed by him in his varied interests in 1880 was 4,000 in round numbers.'

Mr. Gerrish was married July 1, 1869, to Lina W. Probasco, of Croton, Mich.

He died in Evart, May 19, 1882, at the residence of his sister, Mrs. Rose A. Quigley.

He was a man of the keenest moral sensibilities, and an earnest advocate and promoter of temperance principles.

He was himself an abstainer from the use of liquor in the strongest sense, never tasting it in any form.

At the time of his death he was engaged in the construction of an elegant residence at Muskegon, at a projected cost of $30,000.

The publishers of this work take a peculiar satisfaction in presenting the portrait of Winfield Scott Gerrish.

It is a perpetual memorial to the life and influences of its prototype, and adds a special value as does the record of his busy career.

See the page preceding the commencement of this sketch.

 

David Weigel is the oldest of the permanent pioneer settlers of Orient Township, and is a resident on section 4, where he entered a homestead claim, and of which he took possession April 19, 1867.

He has placed 52 acres under good improvements.

Mr. Weigel was born Nov. 8, 1838, near Carlisle, Cumberland Co., Pa.

His parents, Jacob and Catherine (Ressler) Weigel, were of German descent, and were educated in both English and German.

The former was born in 1806, and died in Wilmot, Ind., aged 42 years.

The latter was born Aug. 17, 1810, and still resides where her first husband died.

Both were natives of the Keystone State.

Mr. Weigel was but ten years of age when his father died, and his mother was again married a few years afterward.

He was educated with some care in early youth, and completed his education by attending school from the age of 18 years to the attainment of his majority, at Goshen, Ind.

He has been occupied at various times in teaching, engaging in that business during two terms in Iowa and four terms in the State of Indiana.

On the 27th of July, 1862, he enlisted in Co. E, 124th Ill. Vol. Inf., his command being assigned to the First Brigade, Third Division and Seventeenth Army Corps, under General Logan, Corps Commander.

After the action at Vicksburg the regiment was transferred to the Sixteenth Corps, under General McPherson.

His regiment was engaged in the fight at Fort Gibson, Baker's Creek, Jackson, Champion Hills and Vicksburg.

After the transfer to the Department of the Gulf, Mr. Weigel was in action at Mobile, and went thence to Montgomery, where he was discharged, Aug. 15, 1865, and went to Wilmot, Ind.

He was wounded in Mississippi while on scouting duty.

The detail was lying on the ground and a six-pound Parrott ball, on a voyage of discovery, dropping in among the men, cut off one man's arm and also one knee-pan belonging to the same individual, passed over to Mr. Weigel who lay next behind, and inflicted a severe injury to his right arm.

He was yet incapacitated when discharged from the army, and engaged during the following winter in teaching school.

Mr. Weigel is independent in political views and action.

 

Lorenzo A. Barker, editor and proprietor of the Clarion at Reed City, was born Aug. 16, 1839, in Naples, Ontario Co., N. Y.

George W. Barker, his father, was born March 1, 1815, in Deerfield, Mass., and was married Sept. 7, 1835, to Weltha Tyler.

She was born June 21, 1816, and they became the parents of five children.

Their first born died on the day of birth, April 6, 1837; Lorenzo, born Aug. 16, 1839, is the oldest living child; Bruce, born Jan. 13, 1842, died March n, 1845; Alida, born Aug. 4, 1844, died Jan. 14, 1846; Eugenia, born Jan. 31, 1850, is the wife of Monroe Dickinson, a merchant at Boyne Falls, Charlevoix Co., Mich., and they have one child, Vera Ione.

The father was during a number of years a merchant in the State of New York, and later transferred his family and mercantile interests to Italy Hollow, Yates Co., N. Y. In 1853 another transfer was made, to Battle Creek, Mich., where the senior Barker engaged in the daguerreotype business, and is now a photographer at South Arm, Charlevoix County.

The mother of the subject of this sketch died at Italy Hollow, in 1852.

Mr. Barker passed a year in farm employment after the removal of the family to Michigan.

In 1854, he entered the office of the Battle Creek Journal to learn the art of printing, and was an attaché of the Journal until the year in which rebellion started abroad in the land in its blind and misguided fury.

All through the course of the earlier months after the attack upon the Federal fort at Sumter, while his fingers recorded the disasters of the opening campaign and also the varied literature which arose from the exigencies of the time, he was awakening to the fact that men with the true fire of patriotism blazing in their breasts were surely needed at the front, and he was led by the growing impulse to throw himself early in the contest into the heat of the fray.

He enlisted at Battle Creek, Sept. 28, 1861, in Co. E, Berger's Sharpshooters.

The style of the organization was changed to Company D, of the same regiment, which was known as the 66th Illinois Western Sharpshooters.

Mr. Barker was in action at Mt. Zion, Mo., Dec. 23, 1861; Fort Donelson, Tenn., Feb. 13, 14, 15, 16, 1862; Shiloh, April 6-7; siege of Corinth, April 20 to May 30; Iuka, Sept. 19; Corinth, Oct. 3-4, after which he was occupied in camp duty and guerrilla warfare until his discharge Dec. 23, 1863.

He immediately re-enlisted on the same date at Pulaski, Tenn., in the same command, returning home on a veteran's furlough of 30 days.

On the expiration of his leave of absence he rejoined his command at the front, and the regiment marched to Chattanooga to join General Sherman in the Georgia campaign.

Mr. Barker was under fire at Ball's Knob, May 9, 1864, and Resaca, May 14; and at Rome Cross Roads, May 16, was wounded in the left foot, but recognized no disabling injury and went into battle at Dallas May 27; Kenesaw Mountain, July 3; Nickajack Creek, July 4; before Atlanta, July 22; Jonesboro, Aug. 31; Atlanta, Sept. 2; Lovejoy Station, Sept. 3; Nashville, Dec. 16, 17, 18; Big Salt Creek, Dec. 21; Columbia, S. C., Feb. 17, 1865; Bentonville, N. C., March 2; Kingston, March 10; Goldsboro, March 24; Rolla, April 12; Richmond, Va., May 13, and thence he went to Washington, D. C., for the final scene, the Grand Review.

He was mustered out of the service of the United States at Louisville, Ky., and received his discharge at Springfield, Ill, July 7, 1865.

He retained ownership of his rifle, which he had carried from 1862—a Henry Repeater, 16-shooter—and having the names and dates of the battles engraved beside the lock.

He was discharged as Sergeant.

He came to St. John's, Clinton County, whither his parents had removed.

In 1867 he went to Sioux City, Iowa, and became an employee of the Journal published at that place.

Later he engaged on the Sioux City Times, where he continued until he founded the Sibley (Osceola Co., Iowa) Gazette, issuing its first number July 5, 1872.

He continued its publication until May 30, 1873, when he sold the journalistic enterprise to Messrs. Riley & Brown.

May 26, 1875, he assumed the management of the Chelsea (Iowa) Bugle, and his connection with that paper ceased in October of the same year.

In 1876 he came to Michigan and took charge of the Hastings (Barry Co.) Banner, which he conducted as foreman and manager until April 27, 1877, when he established the Lake City (Missaukee Co.)

Journal, whose publication he continued until May, 1884.

He then sold the paper to H. N. McIntyre, and bought the Reed City Clarion.

He issued the first number May 30, 1884, and has already a fine circulation and a steady growing popularity.

He has a large and increasing job patronage.

The office facilities include two presses, comprising an improved C. B. Cottrell & Sons cylinder press, fitted for hand and steam power, and is the only power press in the county.

The other is adapted to the requirements of job work.

The Clarion is a nine-column folio.

Mr. Barker is a Republican, and is deservedly popular in the local ranks of the party, was elected Presidential Elector in the Blaine & Logan campaign of 1884, and is a member of the West Michigan Press Association, of the I. O. O. F., the Knights of Pythias and the G. A. R., Stedman Post, No. 198, Reed City.

Mr. Barker was married April 16, 1876, in Shenandoah, Iowa, to Mrs. Eliza Jane (Reagan) Grant.

She was born May 20, 1843, in Jackson Co., Mich.

 

Joseph Giles, Liveryman and drayman, resident at Hersey, was born October 17, 1844, near London, Ontario.

His parents, Stephen and Ann (Evans) Giles, removed when he was four years old to St Clair, Michigan.

When he was 12 years of age, Mr. Giles left home to make his own way in the world.

He found ready employment as a saw-mill hand and was a sailor on the lakes several seasons.

In 1871 he came to Hersey and engaged in driving logs on the river through one season, and subsequently engaged in his present occupation on a limited scale.

He has five horses, and is the only representative of his line of business at Hersey.

He owns his barn and fixtures and three lots therewith; also his residence and two lots connected with it.

He was married in Lexington, Sanilac Co., Mich., July 3, 1870, to Hannah Scollay.

She was born in Lexington, Oct. 22, 1855, and is the daughter of Abel and Abbie Scollay.

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Giles—Harry A., Jan. 7, 1872; Charles, Sept. 27, 1876; and Lewis, June 16, 1878.

 

Asa Buck is one of the pioneer business men of Reed City, where he established himself as a marketman in the fall of 1873.

He was born July 19,1846, in Wayne Co., N. Y.

He has been a resident of Michigan since infancy, when his parents removed from the State of New York, and settled on an 80 acre farm in Ingham County, situated five miles from Lansing.

His father, Loren W. Buck, was a native of the Empire State and married Louisa Smith, who was born in the same State.

He was a builder by vocation, and aided in laying out the grounds of the old capitol structure and in erecting the edifice.

Later the family removed to Lenawee County, and afterward to a farm in the township of Noble, Branch County.

Meanwhile, in 1858, the father went to California, and while there occurred the upheaval of interests and issues of the country by the advent of the civil war, and he enlisted from the Golden State in Co. I, First California Vol. Inf., and spent three years in the military service of the United States, serving chiefly in frontier warfare in New Mexico.

Asa and Adolphus entered the army from Michigan, the enlistment of the former occurring at Coldwater in March, 1863, in Co. I, Ninth Mich. Cav., Capt. J. H. McGowan.

The Ninth Michigan Cavalry is distinguished in more than one particular.

Its record of march is one of the most remarkable in the history of the war, as it traversed more than 3,000 miles of territory by battalion the first year of its services, exclusive of skirmish and deploy service.

The regiment fired the last volley at the rebels prior to the surrender of General Johnson.

The preservation of this fact is due to a published notice by a Southern lady in a book of which she was the authoress, and her knowledge of it was due to her appreciation of the gallantry of the officers of the Ninth, who had paid willing tribute to her beauty and enjoyed the hospitality their sincere admiration of her character and position won from her, though she belonged to the losing side.

The fact is authentic, as she was in a situation to observe the progress of events, and her interest in her friends of the Ninth preserved one of the most valuable facts in the record of the regiment.

The Ninth was also the only cavalry regiment of Michigan that marched through to the sea with Sherman, and took part in the closing actions of the campaign under General Kilpatrick.

Mr. Buck was a participant in the varied experiences of the historic progress across the States of Kentucky, Tennessee and the Carolinas.

His brother Adolphus enlisted in the same company and regiment, and they served together until the close of the war.

The father and two sons joined their savings from the war and purchased 211 acres of land in Branch County.

Of this, Mr. Buck of this sketch held a claim of 60 acres.

In 1870 he went to Angola, Ind., and passed two years in the meat business, and also operated as a carpenter.

In the fall of 1883 he came to Reed City, accompanied by his parents.

Associated with his father, he engaged in the meat business, their partnership existing until the father's death in December, 1883.

Mr. Buck continued the prosecution of his business alone until March, 1884, when he rented his stand and retired.

On coming to Reed City he bought the site of his business building and built a market.

He also owns a store building, situated on the west side of his first property.

He and his father erected the fine and substantial brick block on the corner of Upton Avenue and Chestnut Street, of which he is still one-half owner.

Their business was successful from the outset, with the exception of one disaster by fire in January, 1875, when they met a loss of $700, partially covered by an insurance of $500.

Besides the property enumerated, Mr. Buck owns two residences, nearly eight acres of land adjoining Reed City on the northwest and 37 acres a little more than a mile north.

He belongs to the subordinate lodge of Odd Fellows and to the Encampment, is a member of the Patriarchal Circle and of the Princes of the Orient and of Post Stedman, No. 98, G. A. R.

He has served two terms as member of the Council.

The marriage of Mr. Buck to Lydia M. Wood occurred July 11, 1869, in Ovid Township, Branch Co., Mich.

Mrs. Buck was born in November, 1850, in Bethel Township, Branch County, and is the daughter of Dyer and Mary Wood.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Buck were born as follows: Bertha, Aug. 3, 1871; Charles, Feb. 27, 1878; and Lee, Nov. 18, 1882.

 

Robert A. Allured, of the Evart Hardware Company, was born March 7, 1849, in the city of London, England.

His father, John Allured, was a native of England and a bookmaker by trade.

He married Elizabeth Daggs and died in the land of his birth.

In 1855 his widow, with one son and two daughters, and her parents, emigrated to the State of New York, and settled in Monroe County near the city of Rochester, where the subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, and later was in the employment of a butcher in the beautiful city of the Genesee Valley, where he passed three years.

Emma, youngest sister of Mr. Allured, is the wife of William Wallace, of Rochester.

Her sister Elizabeth is an inmate of her home.

In 1868 he came to Flint, Mich., and entered the hardware house of Newton & Hubbard as salesman.

He remained an employee in the business until July, 1873, the firm changing four times within that period.

In that year he came to Evart and, associated with O. M. Brownson, founded a trade in hardware.

The relation was in existence five years, when the business and its connections became the sole property of Mr. Allured.

The establishment where the business was instituted was built by Mr. Brownson, and consisted of a single structure 24 x 60 feet in extent.

He made two additions, 20 x 60 feet, at a later date.

The dimensions were increased by Mr. Allured in 1881, the building now being 44 x 132 feet, with a cellar, and two stories in height.

The incorporated company originally comprised R. A. Allured, M. E. Parkinson and Elmer F. Birdsall.

Mr. Parkinson withdrew from the firm Aug. 20, 1884.

The stock in trade is valued at an estimate of $15,000, and includes all articles common to that branch of business, besides agricultural implements, among which the Champion Mower and Reaper is made a specialty.

Mr. Allured was married March 23, 1876, in Evart, to Alice L. Brownson.

Two children have been born to them, one of whom died in infancy. Karl B. was born March 10, 1883.

Mrs. Allured was born May 25, 1852, in Pontiac, Oakland Co., Mich,, and is the daughter of Oscar M. and Lucy M. Brownson.

She and her husband are members of the Presbyterian Church.

 

Garrah D. De Goit, assistant salesman with G. W. Bevins, merchant at Tustin, was born Nov. 4, 1859, in Van Buren Co., Mich.

His father, William De Goit, was born on the Atlantic Ocean while his parents were en route to the United States from France, 1 their native country.

He grew to manhood in the State of New York, married Lavinia Dennis, and removed to Michigan, where he is living in retirement, settling later in life at Tustin.

The mother is of French parentage and was born in the province of Ontario.

Mr. De Goit accompanied his parents in extreme childhood to Grand Rapids, where he obtained his earliest education.

Later, in 1874, he went to Ionia, and there he added materially to his acquisitions of information by attending the High School for two years, returning at the end of that time to Grand Rapids, again entering the excellent schools of that city as a student.

After completing his education, he was variously occupied until 1878, the date of his making a location in Osceola County.

On coming to Tustin he spent two years as printer in the Tustin Advance.

He obtained employment as a laborer for j& a few years, and in 1882 he secured his present situation.

He is a Republican of decided principles.

He was married Dec. 30, 1883, in Tustin, to Addie was born Dec. 6, 1861, in Cato, New York, and was educated at Weedsport.

Her parents reside in Burdell Township, whither they removed in 1879.

After coming to Michigan she engaged in teaching until her marriage.

 

James C. Corbin, Lumberman, resident at Leroy, was born June 10, 1845, in Van Buren County, Michigan.

He was left an orphan in early childhood by the deaths of his parents, the demise of his mother occurring when he was but two weeks old, and that of his father a few years after his birth.

He was in the care of one family from the death of his mother until 1853, being then eight years old.

He lived in various families until he was 17, and in the fall of 1862 he enlisted in Merrill's Cavalry, as it was known, being an independent organization, doing guard duty and being on scouting service.

Mr. Corbin was in battle only in the action at Little Rock, Ark., and was honorably discharged at Nashville Tenn., after the war was closed in 1865.

After being mustered out, he returned to Michigan and went to Holland, Ottawa County, and obtained employment during three succeeding years.

He was married Sept. t3, 1868, in Wayland, Allegan Co., Mich , to Julia A. Hill.

She was born in 1850, in Grand Rapids, and died Dec. 1, 1878, in Leroy.

One daughter—Hattie May—died before her mother.

Burt E. is the only surviving child.

Mr. Corbin was married June 26, 1881, in Ithaca, Gratiot Co., Mich., to Miss L. Meade.

Mrs. Corbin was born and educated in Gratiot County.

The family came to Leroy Township in the fall of 1874.

Mr. Corbin purchased 160 acres of land on section 17, and a little more than a year after he exchanged it for 80 acres located in another part of the township, of which he was the owner two years, lumbering meanwhile in the interest of Hood, Gale & Co., of Big Rapids.

In the fall of 1879 he sold his farm and embarked in a drug enterprise, which he prosecuted between two and three years, selling in 1882 to his associate in the business.

He then entered quite extensively into the manufacture of lumber, running a saw and planing-mill.

The former establishment was burned in August, 1883, and he has since reconstructed the planing-mill, in which he is doing an extensive business.

He is independent in politics.

 

Joshua W. Matthews, Treasurer of Osceola , County, was born Feb. 3, 1826, in the township of Troy, Oakland Co., Mich.

His father, Solomon J. Matthews, was born in Livonia, Livingston Co., N. Y., June 6, 1799.

He was a farmer and removed to Oakland Co., Mich., in 1822. He died in Troy Township, Aug. 14, 1850.

Susan (Whitney) Matthews, the mother of the subject of this sketch, was born in Livonia, in 1800, and died in Troy Township, in 1864.

They had nine children, eight of whom lived to maturity and seven of whom still survive: Almeron S. is Deputy U. S. Marshal at Pontiac, Oakland County; Jane (1st) is deceased; Jane Ann, Mrs. Nathaniel Voorhies, resides in Troy Township; Susan C. is the wife of F. C. Voorhies, of the same place; Enos R. is a produce merchant at Rochester, Oakland County; Solomon S. is U. S. Marshal at Pontiac; Cordelia.

Mrs. Lewis Hickox, is deceased; Mary married James C. Voorhies, a carriage-maker at Rochester, Oakland County.

Not long after the death of his father, Mr. Matthews purchased the family homestead, comprising 120 acres of well improved and cultivated land, of which he continued resident until 1866, when he removed to Pontiac to discharge the duties of Assistant Revenue Assessor, to which position he had been appointed, and in which he officiated more than five years.

Associated with Henry Nichols and E. C. Martin, in 1879, he bought a half interest in a sash, door and blind factory at Pontiac, the firm style becoming Martin, Matthews & Nichols.

The relation existed actively about two years, when he interested himself in the manufacture of hoisting machines for building purposes, selling the products in Chicago.

In the fall of 1872, he came to Evart, Osceola County, and bought a half interest in a steam saw-mill, forming the manufacturing firm of Lamb & Matthews, which existed until January, 1877.

In the fall of 1876, Mr. Matthews was elected Sheriff of Osceola County, on the Republican ticket, and in the fall of 1878 received a re-election.

He was elected County Treasurer in the fall of 1880, and in 1882 was re-elected.

In 1861 he was elected Supervisor of Troy, Oakland Co., Mich., and he has served three years in succession in the same office in Osceola Township.

In 1883 he was elected President of Hersey village.

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and belongs to Evart Lodge, No. 320, located at Evart.

Mr. Matthews was married Oct. 22, 1848, in Bloomfield Township, this county, to Hannah E. Beach.

Their children were three in number.

The first born and youngest died in early infancy.

Chloe Ann, born Aug. 17, 1850, is the wife of Justus H. Prall, a builder in Pontiac.

Mrs. Matthews was born in Cayuga Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of Thomas C. and Lodema (Ford) Beach.

 

Ransom Cooper, prosecuting Attorney of Osceola and member of the firm of Cooper & Windsor, Attorneys, real estate and loan agents at Reed City, was born May 12, 1854, near Corunna, Shiawassee Co. Mich.

His father, Andrew H. Cooper, was a native of New York, and a farmer by vocation.

The son was but six months old at the date of his father's death.

After that event his mother, Sarah (McGilvrey) Cooper, returned to Sterling, Cayuga Co., N. Y., where she lived with her children seven years, returning when Mr. Cooper, of this sketch, was seven years old, to Caro, Tuscola Co., Mich. She died in 1879.

Ransom was a pupil in the common schools of Tuscola County until he was 17 years old.

He became a teacher, which pursuit he followed until he I was 20, when he entered the Literary Department of the University at Ann Arbor, where he studied two years.

He went thence to Port Austin, Huron Co., Mich., where he followed the business of teaching three years, meanwhile studying law under the instructions of the Hon. Richard Winsor and his partner, Horace G. Snover, a leading law firm of the Huron Peninsula.

He was admitted to the practice of law at the Bar of Michigan at Bad Axe, Huron County, in August, 1879, and in the following month established his legal business at Reed City.

He formed a partnership under the style of Colgrove & Cooper, which relation continued one year, when the present firm was established by the substitution of L. B. Winsor, and its connections are still operative.

The house has founded a substantial law business, deals to a satisfactory extent in real estate, and represents the following fire-insurance companies: Liverpool & London & Globe, American, British, Phoenix of Brooklyn, and the Orient.

Mr. Cooper was nominated on the Republican ticket in the fall of 1880 for Prosecuting Attorney, and made a successful campaign against the candidate of the opposition element, scoring a triumph of 700 majority.

He was re-elected in 1882, without opposition.

Mr. Cooper is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

He is prominently interested in local school matters.

His marriage to Lillian B. Colgrove occurred Dec. 31, 1878, at Charlotte, Eaton Co., Mich.

Edith Belle, only child, was born at Reed City, Nov. 20, 1882.

Mrs. Cooper was born March 20, 1857, and is the daughter of Charles H. and Catherine Colgrove.

 

John A. Lindstrom, salesman for G. W. Bevins, general merchant, is a native of Sweden, where he was born Sept. 30, 1853, in Wermland.

He is the son of Nels and Kate Lindstrom.

His mother dying when he was a child of eight years, he was cared for by others until he was 17, when he returned to the home of his father.

A year later they came to the States, and located on a farm in Sherman Township, in Osceola County.

The senior Lindstrom is a successful farmer of the same township.

Mr. Lindstrom succeeded in obtaining an excellent and thorough knowledge of the use of the English understanding of the customs of American people, was occupied as a common laborer.

In 1880 he entered upon the duties of his present position, which he has discharged with ability and fidelity.

He is a supporter of the tenets of the Lutheran religion and is a Republican in political adherence.

He was married in Tustin Aug. 5, 1881, to Huldah M. Olson, who was born Jan. 16, 1858, in Westevrik, Sweden, where her father is a merchant.

She grew to womanhood in her native land, coming to the United States in 1880.

She is the mother of two children, - Alfdis S. and Florence I.

 

Alanson J. MoCarn, farmer and lumberman, located on section 8, Sylvan Township, was born March 17, 1842, in Plymouth, Wayne Co., N. Y.

Jonas McCarn, his father, was a native of New York and removed his family in 1856 to Perry, Shiawassee Co., Mich., where he died, Sept. 11, 1884, aged 75 years.

His mother, Abbie McCarn, was born in the Mohawk Valley, in New York, and is living in Shiawassee County, aged 72 years.

Mr. McCarn was a pupil in the common schools of his native place until the removal of the family to Perry, when he was 14 years old.

A year later he took the direction of his career into his own hands and when 17 years of age began teaching.

He pursued that calling as a vocation until the second year of the war, when he entered the army.

He enlisted Oct. 31, 1862, in the Seventh Mich. Cav., Co. G, in which he was appointed Sergeant.

His company was under Lieut. Geo. W. Hill, and the command was assigned to the Army of the Potomac.

He was in some of the hottest and hardest fought battles of the war, among which was the action at Gettysburg, where he received severe wounds.

A shot passed through the right lung, emerging from his body under his right arm and crashing through the muscles of that member.

He was transferred from the field hospital at Gettysburg to Finley Hospital, Washington, D. C., whence he was discharged June 2, 1865.

Soon after his return he was married and rented a farm in Perry Township, which he occupied about six years.

In 1876 he sold his farming interests and bought village property at Perry Center, and established a mercantile enterprise which he continued to conduct until his removal to Evart in the autumn of 1874.

He embarked in the same business at that place and managed its relations one year.

At the end of that time he purchased 200 acres of unbroken forest land in Sylvan Township, becoming one of the earliest settlers north of the Muskegon River.

He has since sold a small portion of his place and added 80 acres in Hartwick Township to his possessions.

He has made many improvements on his property.

In 1883 he became the proprietor of a saw-null and has since managed an extensive lumbering manufacture.

In political preference he is a Republican of decided opinions.

He has held several important local official positions, as Supervisor, Treasurer, etc., and is present School Inspector.

He is a member of the Order of Odd Fellows at Perry Center.

Mr. McCarn was married June 26, 1865, to Evelyn M. Durant.

Their children were born as follows: Charles, May 14, 1866; Ernest, Jan. 8, 1872; Lynn, April 26, 1881.

Their mother is the daughter of Nathaniel and Harriet (Bridger) Durant, and was born Nov. 3, 1842.

Her father died in Huron Co., Ohio, when she was four years of age.

Her mother was born in England and died in 1881 in Perry.

Mrs. McCarn was carefully educated and began teaching when 18 years of age.

Willis M. Slosson

Willis M. Slosson, member of the business firm of J. M. Reed & Co. at Reed City, was born May 25,1849, in Newark Valley, Tioga Co., N. Y. Ozias J. Slosson, his father, was born in 1805,at Great Barrington, Mass.

Associated with James M. Reed and Charles Higbe, he came to Northern Michigan in 1856 and aided in the location of Reed City, the firm consisting of Messrs. Reed, Higbe and,Slosson, becoming by purchase the proprietors of more than 4,000 acres of land lying in Osceola and Newaygo Counties.

They platted the city, and two of its thoroughfares—Slosson Avenue and Higbe Street—now perpetuate the memory of their names.

The senior Slosson retained his citizenship in Tioga Co., N. Y., but aided in the development of this portion of Osceola County, and at the date of his death was still one of the leading property-holders in the county.

He died in Newark Valley, Feb. 11, 1862.

The demise of his wife, Mrs. Ann F. (Fisher) Slosson, took place Feb. 7, 1872.

She was a native of Francistown, N. H.

Their family consisted of five children—three sons and two daughters.

Mr. Slosson of this sketch is the youngest son. Arthur B., the oldest, is present Deputy Sheriff of Osceola County, and resides at Reed City.

Edwin Slosson, second son, is a grain merchant at Sabetha, Kan. Willis M. Slosson was reared to manhood and trained in the business habits of his father, remaining on the homestead at Newark Valley until the age of 22 years.

He then went to Kansas, and in partnership with William B. and Samuel Slosson, his cousins, established the business to which his brother Edwin succeeded by an exchange of interests, the younger brother taking his place in the real-estate firm at Reed City, Michigan.

This is where he is engaged in furthering the interests of the business house of which his father was one of the primary members, and which is engaged in the sale of its landed tracts.

(The brothers Slosson purchased the claims of their sisters.)

Mr. Slosson owns also individual property at Reed City, including a business building on Upton Avenue, occupied as a drug store and photograph gallery, a half interest in the lot and building leased as a law office by Messrs. Bellows & Stone, attorneys, and other village property.

He is officiating for the second time as President of the village, of which he has been Trustee two years.

He is prominent in the Order of Masonry, belonging to the several bodies, - Blue Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter and Commandery.

He is also connected with the American Order of United Workmen.

His marriage to M. Ella Butler occurred May 20, 1874, in Newark Valley.

She was born Nov. 20, 1854, and is the daughter of John and Jane Butler.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Slosson were born as follows: Leonard B., April 13, 1875; Lawrence M., Oct. 25, 1878; and Edna E., April 2t, 1880, at Reed City.

The two elder children were born at Sabetha, Kan.

 

George Halladay, merchant and farmer, residing on sec. 10, Lincoln Tp., was born in Leeds Co., Ont., March 8, 1820.

When he was six years of age his father died, and at the early age of eight years he went to live with his brother-in-law, remaining with him until about 17 years of age.

He then started out in the world to take the management of his affairs into his own hands.

He learned the trade of carding and dressing cloth, worked at that business for five years, next engaged in farming for a period of seven years, and then returned to his trade, which he followed for 1 o years.

In 1870 he came to Michigan, settling at Ashton, Osceola County, where he took possession of 80 acres of land under the regulations of the homestead law, and where he now resides.

He has also bought 40 acres on section 9.

During the spring following his settlement here he built a store in Ashton and began business, in company with his son, Frayer, with $1,000 worth of dry goods and groceries.

Their business so increased that they had to enlarge the store building and add largely to their stock.

During the spring of 1884, Mr. George Halladay sold his interest in the mercantile business to his son and retired to the farm in Lincoln Township, where he now owns 160 acres of land, and has about 70 acres in a state of good cultivation.

Mr. Halladay has held the office of Township Treasurer one year, and Overseer of Highways eight years.

In his political views he is identified with the Republican Party, and in religion he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as is also his wife.

He was first married in Canada, Dec. 3, 1844, to Miss Mary White, a native of Ontario.

They have had four children, namely, Frayer, Nancy, Samantha and Adelia.

Mrs. H. died July 22, 1852, and Mr. H. was again married, in Ontario, March 9, 1853, to Phebe Wing, who also was a native of Canada.

By this marriage four children were born, viz.: Annetta, Ida, Wright and Burton.

The second wife died Sept. 30, 1881, and Mr. Halladay chose for his third wife, in Cedar Springs, Kent Co , Mich., Oct. 11, 1883, Mrs. Elizabeth (nee Robinson), widow of David H. Wightman, who died Feb. 15, 1880.

By her former marriage she has had eight children, as follows: William J., Henry H., Clarinda C., Lewis D., Mary E., George S., Louisa, Isabella and Louisa Arabella (twins).

Mrs. H. was born in Otsego Co., N. Y., Sept. 23, 1827.

 

Conrad V. Priest, merchant at Sears, was born at Bath, Ontario, Jan. 5, 1847, and is the son of Ezra D. and Alatheria (Shorey) Priest.

The senior Priest was born in 1809, in Vermont.

His earlier business life was passed in the manufacture of carriages in Bath, whither he removed from his native State, and where he was a pioneer.

He engaged in a mercantile enterprise there, which he conducted 23 years.

A few years before his death he went to Ernesttown, Addington Co., Ont., where he died.

The mother was born in Addington County, in April, 1811, and resides in Napanee, Ont.

Mr. Priest passed his childhood, youth and early manhood in Bath, coming thence to Osceola County in 1873, reaching Evart July 3, and proceeding in September of the same year to Sears.

He established his mercantile business at first in company with George Hume, who sold two years afterward to William Belfour, the firm style becoming Priest & Belfour.

In the winter of 1879 Mr. Belfour was crossing the bay of Quinte on the ice, when the horse they were driving broke through and disappeared, dragging the sleigh and its occupants into the water.

The horse was drowned, but the men saved their lives.

Mr. Belfour took cold, which resulted in quick consumption, and he lived but a few months.

Since his death Mr. Priest has conducted his business affairs alone.

His average stock represents a cash value of $10,000, and his annual transactions aggregate $40,000. He buys every variety of farm produce, and sells everything required by farmers and other patrons.

He buys and presses about 500 tons of hay annually, which he sells to lumbermen.

His business location is one of the best in this section of country.

Mr. Priest is thoroughly educated, and possesses fine scholarly tastes.

He obtained a comprehensive knowledge of common branches at the district schools, and of classics and higher mathematics in an academy.

He has a special liking for geography and history, and is a discriminating reader, keeping himself informed in business channels and current events.

He was married April 15, 1872, to Elizabeth J. Belfour, and they have been the parents of five children, the two oldest of whom died in infancy unnamed.

Lillian Irma was born July 13, 1879; Hattie H., Dec. 18,1881; Nettie M., April 12, 1884.

Mrs. Priest is the daughter of Gabriel and Ann (Armstrong) Belfour, both of whom were natives of the north of Ireland.

Her mother was killed in October, 1868, near Bath, Ont., by a train of cars while crossing a railroad on her return from a provincial fair.

Her father resides in Bath, and is 72 years of age.

They had six children, of whom Mrs. Priest is fifth in order of birth.

She was born in Bath July 16, 1847.

She has one sister and three brothers.

One brother lost his life, as stated in the account of William Belfour.

Mr. Priest is a Republican in political principle and action.

He is an honored and trusted citizen, and has been Postmaster four years, Justice of the Peace six years, and Township Treasurer five years.

 

James W. Turner, Liveryman and proprietor of sale and feed stables at Evart, was born April 3, 1843, in Medina, Orleans County, New York.

His father, Edward Turner, was born on Norfolkshire, England.

His mother, Hannah (Starn) Turner, was a native of England, and their family included five children.

In 1844 they moved to Batavia Township, Genesee County, New York, where he worked as a blacksmith for a time.

There the father became an invalid and never resumed active business life.

Mr. Turner was the oldest child of his parents, and when he was twelve years of age went to live with Hiram Hunn, in the township of Alexandria, with whom he remained four years.

His father's falling into ill health when he was 12 years of age, threw upon him the support of the family.

He was occupied in farm labor by the month six years, when he rented a farm and operated in that method of agricultural pursuit five years.

In March, 1866, he came to Bushnell Township, Montcalm Co., Mich., where he was engaged in farming two years. While residing there his father died.

He went thence to Palo, Ionia County, where he was a farmer and butcher, coming to Evart in the fall of 1872, and there engaged in butchering, in partnership with Rowland S. Comstock, a few months.

In the spring of 1873 the latter sold his interest to Frank E. Turner, and the brothers managed the business jointly until 1878, operating also in real estate, buying tracts of land and putting them in good condition for farming; after which they were sold.

In 1878, Mr. Turner purchased his brother's claim and continued farming, and also embarked in' the purchase and shipment of horses.

In 1880 he founded the business in which he is at present engaged.

On his arrival at Evart, he bought the property he now owns, and established his meat market, which he removed in 1880, and erected the buildings where is now operating.

They are constructed of brick, main portion being 40 x r 13 feet in dimensions and with an addition 20x92 feet for a carriage room.

A wash-room 20x30 feet is connected therewith, also a large frame barn.

He keeps about twenty horses with necessary livery fixtures of a good grade, and combines a considerable traffic in buggies and wagons with his other operations, dealing especially in the Big Rapids wagons and the Columbus baggies.

He has an extensive livery business and deals largely in horses. His farms are on an extensive scale, and he has 235 acres under cultivation.

He has bought and sold cattle, sheep and horses since he was 18 years of age.

There is a brick-yard on his farm near the village of Evart, where, in company with E. C. Cannon, he has been engaged in the manufacture of brick.

Mr. Turner belongs to the Masonic fraternity and to the A. 0. U. W.

His marriage to Julia A. Case, took place March 1, 1864, in Alden Township, Erie Co., N. Y.

They have two children,—Susie E, born Aug. 30, 1871, in Palo, Ionia Co., Mich., and Nina A., born Sept. 21, 1874, in Evart. Mrs. Turner was born June 7, 1843, in Millgrove Township, Erie Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of James E. and Susan (Dixon) Case.

The mother of Mr. Turner resides at Evart. Carrie M. is a widow and resides in the village of Gaines, Genesee Co., Mich.; Henry D. is a butcher at Evart; Frank E. is a liveryman at Chase, Lake Co., Mich.; Rose resides at Evart.

 

John Q. Patterson, Attorney, insurance agent and Notary Public at Reed City was born Aug. 26, 1827, in Wayne Township, Steuben Co., N. Y., and is the son of John and Ellinor Patterson, both of whom were natives of the Empire State.

The father was a ship carpenter by vocation, and in 1835 settled with his family in Putnam Township, Livingston Co., Mich., where he bought a farm of 80 acres.

The mother died there. The senior Patterson died in Stockbridge, Ingham Co., Mich.

Ten children were born to them: William, Mary A., Zera, Jane, Delilah, Ellinor, John Q., Martha, David and Henry.

The oldest and youngest are deceased.

Mr. Patterson was brought up on a farm, and at 21 years of age entered Michigan Central College at Spring Arbor, where he remained four years; teaching in the winter seasons.

In 1855 he engaged in traffic in stock and produce at Ovid, Clinton County, and operated in that line until the date of his enrollment in the military service of the United States.

Dec. 20, 1863, he enlisted at Ovid, and was assigned to a company as Second Lieutenant, the chief officer being Capt. A. B. Wood, and the company being attached to the 27th Mich. Vol. .Inf. in March, 1864.

The command was assigned to the Ninth Army Corps, First Brigade and Third Division, and on the 29th of April became a part of the Army of the Potomac.

The regiment participated in the 14 days' fight in the Wilderness, and in the engagements of the campaign through to Petersburg, including North Anna, Cold Harbor and Bethesda Church; and at the siege of Petersburg, June 18, 1864, Lieutenant Patterson was wounded by grape shot in both lower limbs, an injury which consigned him to the hospital for several weeks.

On recovery he was detailed for recruiting service and served in that capacity, recruiting for the 30th Mich. Reg. Inf.

He returned to Washington in charge of a detachment of men, and proceeded thence to the front.

He was in the siege of Petersburg; and at Hatcher's Run, Oct. 27 and 28, 1864, while in charge of a front line of pickets, he was wounded in the left shoulder by a sharpshooter's bullet, which ranged down through his chest, cutting off three ribs and emerging from his body at the angle of the ninth rib.

He was sent to the field hospital, where he remained five weeks, and was transferred to the City Point Hospital, whence he was sent, two weeks later, to Washington. He remained there some time and afterwards went to Georgetown Seminary Hospital, where he lay ill twenty days with lung fever.

He returned to his home in February, 1865, and received an honorable discharge for disability April 28, following.

He was made First Lieutenant of his company May 5, 1864, and maintained that rank until he was discharged from the service.

After reaching his home he continued some time in precarious health, and as soon as sufficiently recovered, studied law.

He began the practice of his profession at Ovid, and was admitted to the Bar of Michigan in 1868.

In 1873 he removed to Reed City, where he continued his law practice. Later he became associated with W. H. Palmer, with whom he remained about two years, and operated singly, in a satisfactory practice, until 1882, when he purchased the National Hotel, put it in thorough repair, and conducted its affairs as a hostelry until the spring of 1884, when he leased the property and resumed the business of an attorney.

In September, 1884, he sold his interest in the hotel.

In his insurance connections, he represents the Home, of New York, the North British and Mercantile.

He is the proprietor of considerable village property.

Mr. Patterson belongs to the Order of Odd Fellows, to the Grand Army of the Republic, and has served two terms as member of the Village Board of Trustees.

He was married July 4, 1855, at Dexter, Washtenaw Co., Mich., to Ellinor S. Torry, and they are the parents of five children, namely: Emma, who is the wife of Peter A. Auer, clerk in the Treasury Department at Washington.

Mr. and Mrs. Auer have two children, Harry and Nellie.

De Ette married Charles K. Esler, foreman on the Grand Haven (Mich.) Herald; Lee and Dana are the names of their children.

Wilber is a clerk at Reed City.

Ezra D. is an assistant teacher in the Spencerian Business College at Washington, D. C., where he was graduated as valedictorian of his class in 1883.

Bertha is the youngest daughter. Mrs. Patterson is the daughter of Seth B. and Eliza Torry.

 

George Reed, merchant and farmer at Milton, Lincoln Township, is a son of Joseph and Mary (Crawford) Reed, the former a native of England, and the latter of Ireland.

In their family were three children, namely: Mary, now the wife of G. Wilson, and resides in Lincoln Township; George, the subject of this sketch, and James.

Mr. Reed was born in Canada, Jan. 22, 1838, and lived in the Dominion until 1865, when he made a tour of the Western States in search of a place to locate.

In 1867 he came to this county and took possession of 80 acres of land in Lincoln Township, under the regulations of the Homestead Law, settled upon the place and resided there nearly seven years.

He then sold that place and purchased another 80 acre tract, in the same township, which he still owns.

He made this place his residence until the spring of 1884, when he commenced business in the mercantile line at Milton June.

He has a satisfactory trade.

In connection with his store, he has a restaurant and a hotel, suited to the demands of the transient public.

Thirty acres of his farm are cleared and in good cultivation.

Mr. Reed is a Republican in his views of national government, enjoys the esteem of his fellow citizens, and as to local official positions he has been Highway Commissioner two years.

He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

The marriage of Mr. Reed took place in Berrien Co., Mich., Dec. 18, 1878, taking for his wife Mrs. Miranda, nee Smith, widow of Adolphus Griffin.

By her first marriage her children were Stella, Nettie and Dolphie.

By her present marriage there was one son, Joseph by name, who died when three days old.

Mark Ardis, merchant at Evart, and a prominent landholder and business man of Osceola County, was born Oct. 20, 1843, in Newtown-Hamilton, County Armagh, Ireland.

His parents, William and Mary (Boyd) Ardis, are still residents of their native land.

Mr. Ardis was bred to the occupation of a farmer until he was 14 years of age, when he became a clerk, and was employed in that capacity until he came to the United States.

He reached Ionia, Mich., in January, 1867, and entered the insurance and brokerage office of Fred Hall & Co., where he operated as book-keeper until the fall of the same year, when he came to Hersey, and engaged as a salesman in the mercantile establishment of James Kennedy, continuing in the position until he entered the employ of D. A. Blodgett, in 1871.

In the fall of the same year he established his business at Evart, first instituting a general mercantile enterprise, in which he is still operating, his business requiring a stock valued at an average of $15,000, and comprising all articles of merchandise suited to his patronage.

He also conducts a private banking business, buys and sells exchange, makes collections, etc.

He first established his business in a building which he still owns, located opposite the postoffice at Evart, and later removed to his present stand, also his property.

He owns a fine residence, the grounds comprising four lots and 30 acres of land in the northwest part of the corporation.

40 acres of land on section 3, Evart Township, 160 acres on section 18, Middle Branch Township, and 80 acres on section 32, Osceola Township.

Mr. Ardis has served two terms as Village Treasurer.

He was married May 21, 1872, in Brooklyn, N. Y., to Annie, daughter of Philip and Mary Redmond, a native of Ireland.

Their children were born as follows: Minnie E. B., Aug. 14, 1873; Emma M., May 17, 1875; Jennie H.„ July 13, 1876; William F. S., July 31, 1879; Walter R., Oct. 20, 1883.

 

Charles G. Loase, Banker at Reed City was born February 4, 1842, in Detroit, and is the son of John G. and Margaret (Keiser) Loase.

In early life his father was a car builder, and later a merchant in Detroit, where he died.

Mr. Loase obtained his early education in the "City of the Straits," and operated there to some extent as a clerk.

In 1859, when he was. 17 years of age, he went to California and became interested in mining, in which he was engaged five years.

Returning to Michigan, he passed a year in Jackson County, next a period of time at Greenville, Montcalm County, and engaged in building.

In 1873 he embarked in a mercantile enterprise at Altona, Mecosta Co., Mich., which he prosecuted until his removal to Reed City in 1879.

On Jan. 1, 1880, he established his banking business, and has since been engaged in the transactions common to such institutions.

He owns a residence at Greenville, and a valuable farm of 80 acres in Deerfield Township, Mecosta County, all under cultivation.

Mr. Loase was married Sept. 3, 1867, at Greenville, to Frances Norton.

She was born Feb. 27, 1846, and is the daughter of Myron H. and Sarah (Skinner) Norton.

Her father was born in Oakland Co., Mich., was extensively engaged in farming, in Ionia Co., and for a number of years engaged in banking in Greenville, and is 70 years of age.

The mother was born April 12, 1816, in Vermont. Mr. and Mrs. Loase have four children: Mertie was born March 26, 1872, in Greenville; Ernest was born July 26, 1876, in Altona, where the third child, Blanche, was born, July 22, 1878; Clara was born April 1, 1881, at Reed City.

enry A. Clark, Register of Deeds of Osceola County, resident at Hersey, was born July 10, 1850, in Seneca Co., Ohio, at a point two miles south of Tiffin.

His father, Thomas Clark, was born in April, 1819.

He married Mary Judea and settled on a farm in Seneca County, whence he removed with his family, about 1853, to Hardin Co., Ohio, buying a tract of land containing 280 acres.

He is the proprietor of 160 acres, in fine and valuable agricultural condition.

The mother was born in 1814. Seven of their nine children are living: Catherine, now deceased, married Josephus Mustard, a farmer and hotel-keeper in Mason Co., Mich.; Ann M. married R. G. Hubbell, of Ada, Hardin Co., Ohio; Ebert died in Hardin Co., Ohio; Elizabeth J. is the wife of David S. Shadley, a farmer in Osceola County; Lloyd H. resides in Preston, Hardin Co., Ohio; Oliver is a farmer in Middle Branch Township; Henry A. is next in order of birth; Littleton G. is a farmer in Hartwick Township; Mary S. married George Dempster, traveling salesman, and resides in Hardin Co., Ohio.

In 1867, when he was 16 years of age, Mr. Clark came to Hartwick Township in company with his brother-in-law, D. S. Shadley, who was the first settler in the township, and is still a resident there, on section 24.

Young Clark aided him two years in clearing and improving his farm.

On March 9, 1870, Mr. Clark located 143 acres of land in Middle Branch Township, section 30, and cleared 80 acres, remaining there until the fall of 1880, when he was elected Register of Deeds, on the Republican ticket, defeating the candidate of the opposition by a majority of 72t votes.

He was re-elected in the fall of 1882, scoring a triumph by 576 votes.

He removed to Hersey in December, 1880, where he is the owner of a residence and three lots, also of 119 acres of farm land on section 21, Osceola Township.

He also owns an interest in several hundred acres of wild lands, variously located.

He was Supervisor of Middle Branch Township six years, and has served as Justice of the Peace, and in other official positions.

He is a member of the Masonic Order and belongs to Lodge No. 311, at Hersey.

Mr. Clark was married Nov. 11, 1869, in Grand Haven, Mich., to Mary A. Muschawaeck, and they became the parents of three children: Mary Estella was born Oct. 4, 1871, and died Feb. 5, 1872; Rosella J. was born Feb. 8, 1874; and Walter C. was born April 12, 1876, and died Aug. 4, 1878.

Their mother died in Middle Branch Township March 15, 1879.

She was born Jan. 23, 1851, in Germany, and is the daughter of Wolfgang and Walberga Muschawaeck.

Mr. Clark was a second time married in Dearborn Township, Wayne Co., Mich., March 3, 1880, to Mrs. Mary E. Builer, widow of John R. Butler, by whom she had one child, Herbert R.

 

John N. Allen, grocer and provision merchant at Evart, was born April 19, 1833, in Monroe Co., N. Y.

He is the son of Jeremiah and Charlotte Allen, and was reared to the age of 16 years on a farm.

His first independent movement in business was as a traveling salesman, in which capacity he operated 13 years.

In 1864 he bought a farm situated near Pontiac, Oakland Co., Mich., whence he went to Port Huron and from there engaged in exploring for oil in the Dominion of Canada, and speculating in oil stocks at Port Huron and Detroit.

He went next to Southfield, Oakland County, where he bought a 40-acre farm, on which he operated three years, going thence to Northville, Wayne Co., Mich., where he became interested in a large peach orchard.

In the fall of 1872 he came to Evart and bought the site of the building where he is now transacting his business, and erected the structure in which he continued to prosecute the grocery trade without intermission.

He is the owner of 160 acres of land on section 10, Evart Township, with 35 acres under culture.

He is serving his eighth term as Township Clerk of Evart.

Mr. Allen was married July 14, 1864, at New Market, Canada, to Jennie C. Hoag, and their children were born as follows: Cora, Sept. 20, 1865, near Pontiac; Annie, June 2, 1867,at Port Huron; Edith, March 17,1873; John, Sept. 21, 1877, and died June 2, 1884.

The two last children were born at Evart. Mrs. Allen was born Dec. 6, 1843, in Somerset, Niagara Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of Aaron and Marinda (Bennett) Hoag.

Her parents were natives of the State of New York.

 

Amos G. Tennant, farmer, sections 17 and 20, Orient Township, was born April 4, 1831, in Venango Co., Pa.

His parents, tj-W John R. and Lydia A. (West) Tennant had four sons—Elisha A., William M., Amos and John G.

Their father was born of English parentage Feb. 2, 1798, and in 1833 went to Ashtabula Co., Ohio. In 1844, the family removed to St Clair Co., Mich., and thence to the county of Macomb, where the mother died, in May, 1870.

She was born April 10, 1800.

The father was a farmer all his active life, and after the death of his wife he still continued to live with his son Amos until his death, which occurred March 28, 1877.

In 1855, Mr. Tennant went to South Saginaw, where he engaged as a saw-mill hand, and later became superintendent of a saw-mill, in which capacity he operated two years.

He was occupied in a similar capacity in East Saginaw two years, going thence to Galesburg, Kalamazoo Co., Mich., where he was engaged in the manufacture of lumber from 1858 to 1864.

On the first of September, in that year, he enlisted in the Union Army, enrolling in Co. I, 28th Mich. Vol. Inf., and going with his regiment to the front as First Sergeant.

May 8, 1865, he was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant, and Sept. 12 of the same year he was made First Lieutenant, serving in that capacity until he was mustered out of the service June 5, 1866.

His first battle was at Nashville, the regiment being under the command of General Thomas, and afterwards assigned to the 23d Army Corps.

Mr. Tennant was never in the hospital on sick leave, and was in all the active duty where his regiment was engaged.

On being mustered out he returned to Richmond, Macomb Co., Mich.

He became interested in his former employment, and remained in Macomb County until the last days of March, 1872, when he started with a team for Osceola County, where he arrived April 3, and found the snow two feet deep on the ground.

The contrast was rather disheartening, as the farmers of Macomb County were plowing when he left that section a few days earlier.

The family reached their new home by the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad from Saginaw.

He settled on section 17, where he purchased 40 acres of land.

He has improved 50 acres, has an excellent frame barn, and a good log house.

He was married Jan. 1, 1858, to Albina U. Warner.

She was born Sept. 9, 1839, in St. Clair Co., Mich., and is the daughter of John and Hannah (Wilkins) Warner.

The latter was born in St. Alban's, Vermont, in 1818, and died at Galesburg, Mich., in February, 1860.

Her father was also born in St. Alban's in 1811, and died in Wayne Co., Mich., about 1875.

They had two children; Celia, now Mrs. Andrews, only sister of Mrs. Tennant, lives in Orient Township.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Tennant were born as follows: Florence M., Dec. 17, 1858 (died May 17, 1881); Ida H., June 14, 1860; John R., Oct. 7, 1861; Gerald E., April 9, 1863.

Mr. Tennant is a Republican in political affiliation, and has served a term as Justice of the Peace.

Mrs. Tennant is a member of the Disciples' Church.

 

Nathaniel Clark, Register in the United States Land Office, is a pioneer resident of Reed City.

He was born Oct. 2, 1821, in New Jersey, and is the son of John and Amelia (Decker) Clark, both of whom were born in the same State and were of English and German lineage.

His father was born July 11, 1799 and died Sept. 6, 1867; the birth of his mother occurred Nov. 30, 1798, and her demise took place Jan. 19, 1878.

They were married Sept. 2, 1820.

His father moved to Livingston Co., N. Y., in the fall of 1825, where he purchased a farm.

Mr. Clark was reared to manhood on the farm.

He was married Sept. 10, 1844, in Brushville, Livingston Co., N. Y., to Maria Hanford.

She was born March 2. 1824, in Parma, Monroe Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of John and Polly Hanford.

Mr. and Mrs. Clark have been the parents of 11 children, nine of whom are living: Nelson B. was born July 4, 1845, in Sparta, Livingston Co., N. Y., and deals in hemlock bark at Fremont Center, Newaygo Co., Mich.; Annis A. was born Feb. 8, 1847, and lives in Santa Barbara, Cal.; George S., Jan. 1, 1849; Mary E., Feb. 14, 1851; Emma F., Jan. 12, 1853; Ellen T., March 21, 1855; Irvilla, March 11, 1857, and died Nov 26, 1859, John H., Nov. 9, 1858, and died Nov. 26, 1859; Percy H., Sept. 20, 1860; Lillian M., Aug. 16, 1863; Myrtle M., May 10, 1867.

The mother of Mrs. Clark was born March 11, 1794, and she died July 21, 1832.

Her father was born Jan. 28, 1789, and died in the spring of 1862.

In 1847 Mr. Clark went to Jefferson Co., Pa., and engaged in farming, lumbering and merchandise, conducting his combined interests 13 years.

In 1860, he came to Michigan and became interested in lumbering at Vassar, Tuscola County, operating in that line of business for some time.

In the year preceding the close of the war he entered the military service of the United States, enlisting in August, 1864, as a private in the 29th Reg. Mich. Vol. Inf.

He served primarily as a wagon-master of the regiment and afterwards, as brigade wagon-master, and remained in the army until the close of the war. His oldest son was Orderly.

On obtaining his discharge he returned to Tuscola County, to the present site of Cass City, where he engaged in mercantile business and erected the first building for trading purposes in the place.

He established his business in the same avenues in which he had operated at the outset of his independent career, and trafficked extensively as a merchant and lumberman, and also carried on his farming interests.

During a portion of the time he was a member of the mercantile firm of Craw & Clark, located at Caro.

He sold his interests there and came to Reed City in 1871.

At that place he founded a mercantile and lumber trade, which was in active existence two years, and in 1873 he went to Chase, Lake Co., Mich., and operated in general merchandise.

In the fall of 1876 he secured a soldier's claim of 160 acres of land in Custer Township, Mason County, which he proceeded to place in good agricultural condition, with good buildings, orchards and other farm appurtenances, and with 65 acres wholly cleared.

He sold the property in the spring of 1881 and settled at his home at Reed City, where he had continued to maintain his residence.

In 1881 he was elected Supervisor of Richmond Township, which he resigned in April, 1884, to accept the position under the United States Government of which he is still the incumbent.

The duties of Receiver are discharged by W. H. C. Mitchell.

At Reed City, Mr. Clark owns a residence and two lots, and is also the proprietor of 10 acres of land in the southwest part of the village.

He is a Republican in politics and belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic.

At the time Mr. Clark made his location where he resides at Reed City, he had to clear the lot, cut brush and build a road through one square to Upton Avenue.

 

William F. Tule, farmer section 21, Orient Township, was born Feb. 3, 1851, in North Toronto, Can., and is the son of George D. and Anita (Darlington) Tule.

The father was born in Pennsylvania, of German parentage.

He was a farmer by occupation.

The mother was born in Ireland and died in 1855, in North Toronto.

Their family included four children, all of whom are living, and in 1872 they left the Dominion and settled in Osceola County, on an unimproved tract of land in Orient Township, which the father bought of the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad Corporation.

The death of the father occurred Dec. 21, 1872, within the year of the arrival of the household in Orient Township.

Both parties were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Mr. Tule's sisters, three in number, are married.

Caroline C. is the wife of Albert Van Ness, residing on section 16, Orient Township, and was married May 5, 1873; Charlotte N. was married March 4, 1878, to W. D. Strait, and resides in Sylvan Township; Harriet E. was married Oct. 8, 1884, to William D. Clapp.

Mr. Tule is a Republican.

Since his father's death he has remained on the homestead.

William R. Mapes

William R. Mapes, capitalist and speculator at Evart, was born March 9, 1827, ten miles north of Tunkhannock, Pa., and is the son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Miller) Mapes.

His father was a lumberman and farmer in the Keystone State and in 1844 changed his residence to Ridgebury Township, Bradford Co., Pa., where he conducted a hotel one year, going thence to Southport, N. Y.

Mr. Mapes accompanied the family in their changes of locality, and was 18 years of age when they went to reside at the place last named.

There he engaged in farming and teaming, and also learned the business of a millwright, which he followed several years.

In 1855 ne came to Berrien Co., Mich., where he pursued his trade a year, and in 1856 interested himself in lumbering.

In 1862 he became a member of the construction corps in the service of the Government, and continued in that employment until the termination of the war.

On returning he came to Lawrence, Van Buren County, where he owned a saw-mill and passed two years in lumbering.

In 1867 he removed the mill to Bangor, in the same county, and after another two-years pursuit of the same business at that point, made another removal of his property, to Deerfield Township, also in Van Buren County.

He continued his operations there until the fall of 1871, when his mill burned.

He then sold his property in March, 1872, and transferred his residence to Evart.

He bought a business stand, and, associated with William A. Wightman, established a hardware store.

At the end of two years he sold his stock but retains ownership of the building.

He at once interested himself in lumbering, which he has handled to greater or less extent ever since, and has gradually combined the other lines of traffic in which he is engaged.

He is connected with the Order of Masonry, and is a member of Lodge No. 320, at Evart. He is serving a second term as Treasurer of Osceola Township.

He is a staunch and active Republican, and is one of the Trustees of Evart, to which position he has been elected three times.

He was married in Watervliet, Berrien Co., Mich., to Lydia Warren, daughter of John Warren and a native of Niagara Co., N. Y. The portraits of Mr. and Mrs. Mapes appear on other pages.

 

George W. Morris, of the firm of Morris & Martin, proprietors of the Reed City Flouring Mills, was born March 22, 1835, in the township of Ray, Macomb Co., Mich.

Benjamin Morris, his father, was born Oct. 24, 1809, in Morrisville, Madison Co., N. Y., and in 1833 came with his father (the mother having previously died) to the township of Ray, in Michigan, where the family settled on 80 acres of Government land, which was purchased at the rate of $1.25 per acre, and is still known as the "Morris farm."

Jacob Morris was born March 20, 1785, in Massachusetts, and died Aug. 4, 1860.

His parents went to Madison Co., N. Y., where their place of settlement grew to large proportions, and was named for the family, Morrisville, which is the county seat of Madison County.

The grandmother was born July 26, 1785, and died Oct. 10, 1816.

Benjamin Morris died April 25, 1881, at Reed City.

His wife died Jan. 15, 1869, at Orion, Oakland Co., Mich.

In 1856 the family removed to a farm near Birmingham, Oakland County, where they resided about seven years.

In 1863 the farm in Bloomfield Township was sold, and a grist-mill in the same county purchased, in company with W. W. Martin.

This connection continued three years, when R. W. Nye became interested in the same enterprise.

Eventually, Mr. Morris became sole proprietor by purchase, and conducted the affairs of the mill singly until 1877, when it was sold, and he came to Reed City, where, associated with E. B. Martin, he built the mill now managed by Messrs. Morris & Martin.

It is 48x56 feet in dimensions and three stories in height above the basement. It is fitted with four sets of double rollers and three pairs of buhrs, with other modern fixtures.

Its capacity per day is 100 barrels of flour, and incidental custom work.

The site of the mill includes about 10 acres of land.

Mr. Morris is the owner of 40 acres of land in Richmond Township, in an excellent agricultural condition, and also owns his residence and three village lots therewith.

His marriage to Lovinia Martin occurred in the township of Bloomfield, Sept. 27, 1860.

She was born July 25, 1841, in Troy Township, Oakland County, and is the daughter of William W. and Samantha (Stockwell) Martin.

The former was born in January, 1806, in Cayuga Co., N. Y., and in 1825 became a pioneer of Oakland County, where the family was among the earliest of the permanent settlers.

He is now living in Reed City.

The mother was born in the State of New York and died in Birmingham, July 27, 1879.

Mr. and Mrs. Morris have two children: Samantha A., who was born Sept. 25, 1861, and is the wife of Maurice W. Stevenson, real-estate broker of Grand Rapids; and Hettie E. was born April 25, 1864, and married George S. Preston, liveryman at Big Rapids.

 

Oliver L. Millard, Clerk of Osceola Count, resident at Hersey was born June 26, 1845, in Lockport, Niagara Co., N. Y.

His father, Junius A. Millard, was born in November, 1817, in Niagara County, and is now a fanner in Pittsford Township, Hillsdale Co., Mich. His mother, Narcissa (Haroun) Millard, was born in October, 1827, in the city of Syracuse.

Two of their three children are now living: Bertram J. is a traveling salesman and grocer at Vicksburg, Kalamazoo Co., Mich. Emma L. died at the age of 11 years.

In 1829 the family located in Pittsford Township, the father buying 80 acres of land which has since been the homestead.

Mr. Millard was reared to manhood on the home place, and was a member of the parental household until his marriage Jan. 1, 1867, to Maria J. Miner.

She was born in the same township, March 1, 1844, and is the daughter of James H. and Phebe Miner.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Millard were both born in Pittsford Township. Herbert A. was born April 8, 1868, and Emma L., Nov. 7, 1871.

Mr. Millard continued a resident there until his removal to Osceola County in February, 1873, when he secured 80 acres of land on section 6, in Rose Lake Township, of which he took possession and commenced the labors of a pioneer, clearing and otherwise improving his land, erecting necessary farm buildings, and placed 60 acres in good agricultural condition, with excellent orcharding.

While a citizen of Rose Lake Township, he was alternately elected to the offices of Clerk and Supervisor, holding one position or the other every year he was a resident there, with one exception.

While in Hillsdale County, he served two terms as Township Treasurer.

In the fall of 1882 he was elected County Clerk, on the Republican ticket, by a majority of 424 votes over the opposition candidate.

In December following he removed to Hersey, to facilitate the discharge of the duties pertaining to his position.

He owns his house and lot, and, in company with Henry A. Clark, is the proprietor of 320 acres of land in Richmond and Marion Townships.

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as is also his wife.

 

Ellery C. Cannon, merchant at Evart, was born Dec. 28, 1842, in the township of Shelby, Macomb Co., Mich.

The family to which he belongs is one of the most prominent in the history of the development of Northern Michigan, with which it has been inseparably connected from the Territorial days of the Peninsular State.

His father, Rev. John Cannon, was born Sept. 22, 1808, in Saratoga Co., N. Y., whence he removed with his family in 1834 to Macomb County.

He is the proprietor of 60 acres of land in Shelby Township, and occasionally officiates in his capacity of minister of the Christian Church.

Geo. H. Cannon, his uncle, has made the family patronymic prominent in his position of surveyor, in which he has been engaged for a long period of years, and has operated, over a wide-spread territory in Michigan, in the employ of the United States Government.

The mother of Mr. Cannon, Sallie (Cook) Cannon, was born in Saratoga Co., N. Y.

She is the mother of seven children.

Mr. Cannon was reared on a farm in his native township, and was occupied in the quiet pursuits pertaining to agriculture, when the nation was suddenly convulsed by the advent of civil war.

He enlisted Aug. 9, 1862, at Washington Corners, Macomb County, in Co. B, 22d Regt. Mich. Vol. Inf., Captain Keeler.

He was discharged at Detroit July 20, 1865, after the close of the war.

He was an active participant in the various battles in which his regiment was engaged, and encountered the arduous service which characterized the field record of the "Twenty-second," passing safely through the hard-fought battle of Chickamauga, where his regiment went into action with 600 equipped men, only 50 of whom afterward responded to their names at roll call.

On being discharged from military service, Mr. Cannon returned to his father's farm. In 1868, associated with his brother, John W., he founded a mercantile enterprise at Washington Corners, and there managed a successful business.

In September, 1871, he came to Evart and opened a branch store under the same firm relations which existed until January, 1876, when it became S. B. & G. H. Cannon, the former being sole and resident manager.

In partnership with Geo. F. Andrus, he owns a farm of 190 acres, situated on the Muskegon River, three miles north of Evart, 50 acres being cleared and cultivated.

Mr. Cannon is a Republican in political connection.

He has been Treasurer of Osceola Township two years, Supervisor four years (is present incumbent), member of the Village Board four years, has served three terms as Chairman of the Board of Supervisors and in various other positions.

He was the first Treasurer of Evart village, and occupied the position three years.

He is the Treasurer of the Osceola County Agricultural Society and has held the position eight years.

Mr. Cannon has served as Treasurer of the Masonic Lodge at Evart, of which he is a member, since its organization.

In the fall of 1884 he was elected a member of the lower House of the Legislature of Michigan.

Mr. Cannon is one of the leading business men in Osceola County.

He is justly accorded first rank in ability, integrity and reliability of judgment and character.

His marriage to Harriet N. Sybrandt occurred Dec. 28, 1868, at Washington Corners.

Their only child - Emma E. - was born at the same place, March 8, 1870.

Mrs. Cannon was born Jan. 12, 1841, in Niagara Co., New York.

 

Frayer Halladay, merchant at Ashton, is a son of George and Mary (White) Halladay, who were natives of the Dominion of Canada, married and settled in Leeds Co., Ont.

Mr. George Halladay remained in Canada until the fall of 1870, when he came to Osceola County and settled in Lincoln Township, where he still is a resident.

He had a family of eight children, named in the following order: Frayer, Nancy, Samantha, Adelia, Annetta, Ida, Wright and Burton.

The subject of this biographical outline was born in Leeds Co., Ont., Oct. 15, 1846, and received as he grew up a common-school education, remaining at home until 18 years of age, after which he attended the commercial college at Hamilton, Ont., for three months.

On leaving home he went to New York State and "worked out" one summer, and then returned to his father's in Canada.

Soon afterward he went to Wentworth County, in the Dominion, where he was employed two years as engineer in a saw-mill.

In the spring of 1869 he came to Michigan and remained at Grand Rapids until the following fall, when he came to Osceola County and took possession of 80 acres of Government land in Wexford County, but did not finally "prove it up."

The following spring he opened a general store at Ashton, where he now keeps a stock of merchandise in all the branches suited to the demands of the country.

His is the largest store in the place, and he enjoys an extensive patronage, doing a business of about $25,000 yearly.

Besides, he owns 760 acres of land, most of which is located in Lincoln Township.

He has about 80 acres under cultivation.

Until May, 1884, his father, George Halladay, had an interest in the store, and the firm was known as "Halladay & Son."

During the month named Mr. H. bought out his father's interest, and thenceforward has carried on the business alone.

Mr. Halladay has held the office of Supervisor of Lincoln Township for five years, being re-elected to the position in the spring of 1884.

He has also held the position of Township Treasurer three years, and all the minor official trusts in the town.

In his views of political affairs he is a Republican, and since April, 1877, he has been Postmaster of the village of Ashton.

He was married at Mound City, Ill., Nov. 30, 1875, to Miss Elizabeth McIllmurry, who was born in Canada.

To Mr. and Mrs. H. have been born three children, namely: Grace M., LeRoy W. and Eva.

 

Jesse T. Minchin, editor of the Evart Review, was born July 25, 1856, at Pontiac, Oakland Co., Mich.

His father, Thomas Minchin, was born Sept. 1, 1826, in Winchcome, Gloucestershire, Eng., and became a citizen of the United States and of Michigan in 1850.

The mother, Elizabeth Minchin, was born Oct. 14, 1816, at Baisingstoke, Hampshire, Eng., and came thence in 1857 to Michigan.

Mr. Minchin acquired a common-school education at Pontiac, where in 1874 he entered the office of a local newspaper and obtained a thorough and practical knowledge of printing in all its details, and of the "ins and outs" of journalism.

He speedily took foremost rank in the guild and operated as foreman of the Pontiac Bill Poster, his Alma Mater, during 1876-7-8.

In July, 1878, he went to Reed City, and, associated with his brother, George W. Minchin, purchased the Clarion, which they conducted jointly until December, 1880.

At that date the proprietors sold the paper and purchased the Evart Review, which they have since managed and are still conducting in co-partnership.

In 1879 Mr. Minchin served as Clerk of Reed City.

He was elected Secretary of the Osceola County Agricultural Society, in 18811, and discharged the duties of the position three years.

Since removing to Evart he has served as a member of the Board of Education, on the Board of Water Commissioners, and is the present (1884) President of the village.

He was married Nov. 14, 1877, to Minnie M. Murray, of Pontiac, Oakland Co., Mich.

She was born Nov. 11, 1863, and is the daughter of Seth T. and Jennie M. (Collier) Murray.

Mr. and Mrs. Minchin are the parents of three sons, torn as follows: Jesse M., March 24, 1880; Eber W., July 2, 1883; and George B., June 24, 1884.

 

Timothy V. Childs, retired miller and farmer, resident at Reed City, was born Jan. 29, 1820, in Genesee Co., N. Y., and is the son of Elias and Tamar (Vincent) Childs, both of whom were natives of Vermont, where they were married.

A few years after that event, they removed to the State of New York, going thence to Medina Co., Ohio.

Later they came to Kalamazoo, Mich., and there the father died, Nov. 3, 1847.

He was born April 23, 1780.

The mother died in Livingston Co., Mich., Aug. 13. 1865.

She was born Aug. 12, 1781.

Their family comprised 13 children, only two of whom are living.

Asa Childs is 82 years of age, and resides in Tiffin, Ohio.

Mr. Childs is the youngest of the family, and was reared under the personal care and supervision of his parents, working as a carpenter with his father and also on the farm.

He accompanied his parents in their removals, and was the custodian of their comfort in their declining years.

He was married Oct. 8, 1840, to Sarah E. Jones.

She was born Aug. 16, 1816, in Geneva, Ontario Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of Frederick and Polly Maria Jones.

After marriage Mr. and Mrs. Childs resided in Medina Co., Ohio, a number of years and Mr. Childs was there engaged as a farmer.

In 1844 he came to Yorkville, Kalamazoo Co., Mich., removing thence to Otsego, Allegan Co., Mich., where he became the proprietor of the Exchange Hotel.

The house was burned about two years after and Mr. Childs entered the grocery and provision store of S. D. Foster as a salesman.

Two years later he engaged in the same business independently, and two years after exchanged his business for a stage route and necessary equipments, the line running between Kalamazoo and Allegan.

He managed its affairs eight years and bought a farm of 120 acres in Allegan County, in the township of the same name.

In April, 1873, Mr. Childs came to Osceola County and founded a grocery, provision and general supply business suited to the necessities of the then embryo village, which is now Reed City.

About five years later he erected a saw, grist and planing mill, located on Upton Avenue in a central situation.

He continued their proprietor until December, 1884, when he exchanged his claim in them for a farm of 200 acres of land near Baldwin, Lake Co., Mich.

The place is valuable both in fact and promise, 70 acres being in first-class agricultural condition.

Mr. Childs is a Republican; he was a Whig in the days of Harrison, for whom he cast his first vote, and he has since acted consistently with his political convictions, and voted straight with the element to which he has belonged throughout.

Mrs. Childs is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

Allen Campbell, cashier of the bank at Evart, was born March 4, 1844, in Columbia Co., N. Y.

His father, John Campbell, was born in Argyle, Scotland, and learned his trade of machinist at Aberdeen, in the "land of heather 'and mist."

His mother, Barbara (Russel) Campbell, was also born in Scotland. Both are deceased.

On emigrating to this country they settled in the State of New York, where they became farmers and reared their family.

Mr. Campbell was occupied during the years of his minority preceding the age of 18 years in obtaining his education and on the family homestead.

He came to Michigan in 1855, and enlisted at Fenton, Genesee County, Sept. 15, 1861, as a private in Co. F, First Regiment Michigan Engineers and Mechanics.

He soon received promotion to the position of Quartermaster's Sergeant, and later was made Second Lieutenant of Co. D, in the same regiment.

He was in the service until the close of the war, participating in the engagements at Mill Springs, Perryville, Stone River (where 600 of his regiment withstood a charge made by 2,000 rebels), and was under fire in all the fights in which his regiment was involved in the famous march through Georgia to the sea, and fought at Chattanooga, Atlanta, Savannah, Averysboro and at Bentonville.

The command went to Washington for the Grand Review, whence Mr. Campbell came to the township of Groveland, Oakland Co., Mich.

He bought 140 acres of land, of which he made a model farm, with superior orcharding and stocked with numerous varieties of fruit.

At the same time he began to operate in loans to some extent. He was prominent in politics and a zealous, declared Republican.

In 1882 he was placed in nomination by his party to represent his district in the Legislature of Michigan, but "achieved defeat" from the well-known strength of the Democratic element in that section of the Peninsular State.

In the fall of 1883 he removed to Evart and established a private banking house.

His range of business includes the transactions common to similar institutions.

Mr. Campbell is a member of Post Sedgwick, at Holly, Mich., Grand Army of the Republic.

He was married May 17, 1866, in Groveland Township, to Mary L., daughter of John S. and Mary L. Warrin.

Mrs. Campbell was born in the State of New York.

Gilbert M. Clark, farmer, section 4, Lincoln Township, is a son of James M and Hannah B (Collister) Clark.

His parents, who were natives respectively of Massachusetts and New York State, had a family of six children, the second of whom is the subject of this sketch.

He was born in Lorain County, Ohio, July 14, 1845, attended common school until he was 20 years of age, and also for a time the preparatory department of Oberlin College.

After quitting school Mr. Clark engaged in farming, which has been the chief occupation of his life.

He came to Osceola County in the spring of 1881 and purchased 380 acres of land in Lincoln Township, where he now is a resident and has a fine farm of 100 acres in cultivation.

In his political views Mr. C. is a Republican, and was once elected Justice of the Peace, but did not qualify.

He was married in Ashland Co., Ohio, Feb. 22, 1871, to Miss Lydia A. Biddinger, who was born in that county, May 2, 1849.

Her parents, David and Fanny (Peck) Biddinger, were natives respectively of Ohio and Pennsylvania.

 

William Tennant, farmer, section 20, Orient Township, has been a resident of Osceola County since 1868, and of Michigan since September, 1844.

He removed hither from Ionia with an ox team, camping out one night, two and a half miles west of Evart, the snow being two feet in depth.

He crossed the Muskegon River on an old scow one mile west of Evart, or where that village now stands, its location being then covered with pine.

From thence Mr. Tennant cut his way through to the farm of his son-in-law, John Smith, with whom his family remained from March to July.

Meanwhile he located the farm he has since occupied, went to the land office at Ionia and placed his first papers.

He built a log house on the place, to which he removed his family and where they took up their abode, living the first three weeks without a floor in their cabin.

The nearest trading point was Hersey, 20 miles away, and there was the only post office in the county.

Those who desired to cross the river were obliged to wade the stream or impel themselves across it on a species of raft made of two logs fastened together with a plank or slab.

Mr. Tennant came near drowning on one occasion when crossing in this primitive manner.

Flour was $16 to $18 per barrel, and pork 25 cents per pound.

The woods abounded in deer, bear and wolves.

The first were so plenty that they were as a rule encountered whenever a trip was made into the woods.

Wolves frequently came and lapped water near the cabin door.

Mr. Tennant was born Aug. 19, 1822, in Colchester, near New London, Conn., and is the son of John R. and Lydia A. (West) Tennant.

His father was born Feb. 2, 1798.

His family wen^ from Connecticut to New York, and thence, after a residence of a few years, to Allegheny, Venango Co., Pa.

Half a dozen years later they came to Lake Co., Ohio, and after three years to Ashtabula County in the same State, where they resided 15 years.

In 1844 another removal was made, to China, St. Clair Co., Mich.

This was their home seven years, after which they settled on a farm in Richmond, Macomb County.

After residing on this 14 years they took possession of a farm in Ionia County.

In 1868 the place was sold, and the family of William Tennant came to Orient.

The father died in Orient, this county, aged about 77 years.

The mother was born April 10, 1800, and died at the age of 70 years, in Richmond, Macomb Co., Mich.

Mr. Tennant was married Oct. 9, 1844, in St. Clair County, to Betsey Burdick, and they have had six children: Mary A. was born in 1845; Helen, Feb. 2, 1848; Emma J., Sept. 29, 1850; George, Jan. 1 1, 1855; Esadine, July 16, 1859; William J., April 12, 1863.

Mrs. Tennant was born March 24, 1824, and is the daughter of Jewett and Huldah (Wright) Burdick.

The mother died in 1878, aged 76 years.

The father's death occurred in 1881, when he was 84 years of age.

They died in Madison, Lake Co., Ohio.

Mr. Tennant adopts the principles and issues of the Republican Party.

 

Andrew Dahlstrom, Pastor of the Swedish Free Church and farmer on section 15, Lincoln Township, is a son of Andrew and Mary Dahlstrom, natives of Sweden, who passed their lives in that country.

The subject of this sketch was also born in Sweden, June 19, 1845, and lived in his native country until the fall of 1866; then lived in Norway a year and a half; next, he emigrated to America and spent a year and a half in Wisconsin; then worked at cabinet-making (which trade he had learned mostly of his father) in Chicago until the spring of 1873, when he came to Osceola County and purchased 40 acres of land, where he now resides.

He has since added by purchase 80 acres more, so that now he has a total of 120 acres of good agricultural land, 65 acres of which are in a state of good cultivation.

On his arrival in this county, Mr. Dahlstrom started a Sunday-school, and soon afterward he was called by his countrymen to preach the gospel.

Accordingly, his time is now thus chiefly occupied, and he is consequently under the necessity of hiring laborers for his farm.

Both as Pastor and farmer, Mr. D. exhibits the traits of industry and careful judgment characteristic of his native country, and a brilliant success is therefore in prospect for him in this pioneer land.

On political matters, he votes with the Republicans.

 

Alexander Fraser, farmer, section 27, Cedar Township, was born June 2, 1845, in Haldimand Township, Northumberland Co., Ont.

He is the son of John and Margaret (Aird) Fraser.

The latter is living with a son in Brighton, Ont.

The father disappeared 25 years ago and has not since been traced.

The family included seven children, as follows: Isabella, Alexander, William, Catherine, Anna, Maggie, Jessie, Mary (deceased) and James.

Mr. Fraser was reared a farmer, in which occupation he has passed his life.

In the spring of 1865 he moved from the Dominion to the vicinity of the city of Rochester, where he passed three years in farming, working by the month and, during the seasons for packing trees for shipment, worked in the nurseries.

In 1868, in the fall, he removed to Grand Rapids and passed the winters of three years as a lumberman.

He passed the summers in varied employments until 1871, when he came to Hersey Township and bought 40 acres, of land of the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad Company.

Later, he sold the place and engaged as foreman of a lumber camp, his wife acting as cook. He continued in this employment five years, and in 1882 he purchased 160 acres of land.

Of this 100 acres are chopped and 80 acres are logged, and the place is supplied with a good frame barn and house.

Mr. Fraser's prospects for becoming one of the solid men of Osceola County are unusually good.

He was married July 4, 1870, to Jane Ann, daughter of Elihu and Almira (Garrett) Rawson.

Her father lives in Brighton, Ont., where her mother died, in March, 1881.

Mrs. Fraser was born in Watertown, Jefferson Co., N. Y. She is the oldest living of six children.

Timothy is deceased. Charles, Clark W., Sarah, Margaret and Isaac are living. Henry is deceased.

Mr. Fraser will take out his naturalization papers in this current year (1884), and identify himself with the Republican Party.

 

James Gavin, farmer and lumberman, resident on section 26, Hersey Township, is the proprietor of 80 acres of land, which constitute the family homestead, and also owns 40 acres on section 25, in the same township.

He was born March 27, 1845, in Hastings Co., Ont.

His father, Andrew Gavin, was born in Ireland, and after his marriage he emigrated, in 1840, to the Dominion of Canada.

The parents were resident there until their removal to Evart, Osceola County, in 1881.

They are living in quiet retirement, and are nearly three score and ten years of age respectively.

Mr. Gavin became the master of his own fortunes at the age of 18 years.

He judged that Northern Michigan held an opportunity for a man with rugged, unbroken health and determined energy, and he came to Osceola County.

He has operated during each succeeding winter as a lumberman, and since his purchase of his farm has vigorously pushed his agricultural interests through the farming seasons.

He was married April 23, 1873, to Annie Collins, and they have a family of six children, born as follows: James A., Feb. 20, 1874; Ellen A., Oct. 17, 1875; Abbie C., Sept. 22, 1877; William H., March 5, 1879; Anna, Sept. 23, 1880; Ezetta, Dec. 12, 1883.

Mrs. Gavin is the daughter of Morris and Abbie (McCarty) Collins.

Her parents reside in Hartwick Township, Osceola County, and of 12 children born to them, but one is deceased.

The brothers and sisters of Mrs. Gavin are Maggie, Patrick, Florence, Jay, Abbie, Albert, Ellen, Mary, Morris, James and Daniel.

Mr. Gavin is a Democrat.

 

Charles W. Ball, book-keeper in the general mercantile house of Mark Ardis at Evart, was born July 3, 1849, in Goshen Township, Hampshire Co., Mass.

His parents, Warren J. and Almira C. (Tower) Ball, were both natives of Hampshire Co., Mass., and reside on their farm in the Bay State.

Mr. Ball left his paternal home when he was 18 years of age and came to Ionia, Mich., where he became an employee of the Hon. John C. Dexter in his flouring mill located in that place.

In December, 187 1, Mr. Dexter opened a supply store at Evart, for the benefit of the lumbering population, and in 1873 admitted Mr. Ball to a partnership, which existed until the demise of Mr. Dexter.

Preceding the copartnership, the former had pursued a course of study at the Agricultural College at Lansing, where he was graduated in August, 1873.

The business is still in existence, the interest of Mr. Dexter having been sold and Mr. Ball retaining his claim.

He established a trade in groceries and provisions after the death of his partner, which he managed 18 months, acting at the same time as Express Agent.

In the spring of 1880 Messrs. Dexter & Ball erected the Novelty Flouring Mills, having two run of stones and a producing capacity of 50 barrels of flour daily, besides feed and custom work.

The mill is now owned by Mr. Ball and Osman Tower, and is operated by parties who have leased it.

In March, 1884, Mr. Ball entered upon the duties of

George W. Bevins

George W. Bevins, Postmaster and merchant at Tustin, was born Aug. 30, 1851, in Livingston Co., N. Y.

His father, John Bevins, was also a native of the Empire State, and in 1859 removed with his wife and children to Kent Co., Mich., settled on a farm and was continuously a resident there until his death in 1866.

The mother, Mary (Sabin) Bevins, was born in the State of New York, and died in Kent Co., Mich., in the same year in which the demise of the husband and father occurred.

Their family comprised five children, three daughters and two sons.

Mr. Bevins is the fourth child of his parents in order of birth, and is the elder son.

He was eight years of age when he accompanied the family to Michigan, and he was educated principally in Kent County.

When he was 15 years of age his parents were both removed by death, and he went to Smyrna, Ionia Co., Mich., and became a member of the family of his uncle, where he worked on the farm summers and went to school winters.

He came to Leroy, in Osceola County, where he attained his majority and became a salesman in the store of his uncle, J. E. B;vins (see sketch), where he operated in the same capacity four years.

In 1876 he came to Tustin and established a mercantile business, associating G. A. Estes with himself in its prosecution.

In 1878, the prosperity and extension of the relations of the firm requiring more commodious quarters, they erected a building 36 x 60 feet in dimensions.

Five years after the organization of the firm Mr. Bevins succeeded to the sole proprietorship, and since that date he has made an addition to the structure, 22 x 40 feet in extent, for the accommodation of the post office.

His stock of merchandise is varied and extensive, and represents a cash value of about $7,000—annual sales amounting to $25,000 on an average.

Mr. Bevins is the owner of several improved village lots.

He is also the proprietor of 126 acres of land, situated in Burdell Township.

Of this, 30 acres are under improvements.

He is a born and bred Republican, a thoroughgoing, active, energetic business man, and has invariably aided and sustained all measures for the permanent well-being of the community of which he is a member.

He has served ten years as Notary Public, and six years as Postmaster, to which post he was appointed in 1878.

He was married June 4, 1876, to Laura L. Moon, and they are the parents of two children—Eva M. and Elton, born respectively May 14 1877, and May 22, 1882.

Mrs. Bevins was born July 5, 1852, in Erie Co., Penn., and is a farmer's daughter.

Her parents are quite advanced in years, but are enjoying a hale and hearty old age.

She acquired a good education and officiated some years as a teacher.

The portrait of Mr. Bevins on the opposite page is a valuable addition to the Album of Osceola County, in view of his efficiency as a public man and as a representative of a family to whom the county owes much.

 

Lyman W. June, farmer, section 5, Cedar Township, was born Dec. 29, 1845, in Huntington, Lorain Co., Ohio.

He dates his origin back to the period of the colonial settlement of America, and is of unmixed descent.

His parents, William C. and Mary S. (Whiton) June, are living in Lorain Co., Ohio.

The former was born in Vermont, the latter in Massachusetts.

They are aged respectively 76 and 60 years.

They had nine children, all of whom attained adult age save one, who died in infancy.

They are named Edwin, Olivia, Louisa, John, William, Lyman (deceased), Lyman (2d), Henry and Milo.

The Civil War was upon the people of this country before Mr. June was 15 years old.

He enlisted as a soldier for the Union Dec. 10, 1863, in Co. E, 128th Ohio Vol. Infantry.

His regiment belonged to the 20th Army Corps, but he was detailed for provost guard duty and had his headquarters as custodian of the prison of commissioned officers at Johnson's Island, where he operated during his entire period of service.

He was stationed there at the time of the attempted liberation of the prisoners by the rebels.

On being mustered out of the military service he became a carpenter and soon acquired an excellent reputation as a craftsman.

He continued to operate as a builder five years, and at the age of 22 years he attended Baldwin University, remaining there one year, when he went to the Western Reserve Seminary and continued as student and teacher one year.

Afterward he went to Mount Pleasant, Iowa, where he was a student one year at the Wesleyan University.

After operating four succeeding years as a teacher in the same institution, he returned to Ohio and became interested in the lumber business, which he pursued five years.

Next, he came to Greendale Township, Midland Co., Mich., and passed two years as a lumberman and millwright.

At the end of that time he was burned out and lost all his personal property.

He owned 160 acres of land, which is yet in his possession.

After his disastrous loss by fire he operated some time as a millwright and headsawyer, and then came to Osceola County and bought "80 acres of land in Cedar Township, of which he cleared several acres.

He was married June 8, 1871, to L. Melvina Mills, and they have had five children: Mary E. was born April 19, 1874, in Mount Pleasant, Iowa; Bartholomew was born Dec. 15, 1876; Martha J., Sept. 3, 1879; Eva Pearl, Jan. 19, 1882, in Midland.

The second and third children were born in Huntington, Ohio.

One child is deceased. Mrs. June is the daughter of Galen A. and Elizabeth \$ (Stratton) Mills, both of whom are living in Berea, Ohio.

Her father has been a merchant, but has retired from active business.

The family contained nine children, born in the following order: Priscilla A., James, Margaret, Mrs. June, Artemus, Daniel, Samantha, Ida and Inez.

The great-great-grandfather of Mrs. June, James Parks, lived to the age of 111 years.

He was a renowned Indian hunter, and was much dreaded by the red-skins who infested the frontiers during the early history of the Colonies.

Six of the savage family made their appearance to him at one time, when he was in the forest splitting rails to fence his garden.

They placed themselves between him and his gun and informed him that he was about to die.

He acquiesced in the decision making one proviso, that they should assist him in splitting the remainder of the rails, so his wife could have the fence as intended.

They assented, and he instructed them how to take hold of the log with their fingers to expedite the rail-splitting!

He took the maul and, speedily knocking out the wedge in the log, they were all prisoners in a moment.

He obtained his gun and slaughtered the entire party!

Mr. June is a Republican in political sentiment, and is actively interested in school matters.

He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

John Isaacson is a farmer on section 5, Richmond Township.

He was born in the kingdom of Sweden, April 16, 1854; his parents, Allen and Eureka (Daniel) Isaacson, were also natives of that country.

He emigrated to the "land of opportunity " in 1871, coming directly to this county and purchasing 80 acres of railroad land, where he now resides, and has about half his landed estate in a condition of good and productive cultivation

He was married in Big Rapids, Mich., to Christiana Anderson, who also was a native of Sweden.

Mr. and Mrs. Isaacson have become the parents of two children, namely, Alice S., one who died in infancy, and Ida C.

In his principles concerning the welfare of this nation, Mr. Isaacson, as well as nearly all Swedes, sympathize with the Republican party.

 

Stephen R. Jones, Postmaster at Hersey, was born Oct. 15, 1826, in Yates Co., N. Y.

His father, William B. Jones, resides in Bath, Steuben Co., N. Y., and is in his 83d year.

His mother, Abiah (Raplee) Jones, was a native of New York, and died in 1833. The family removed from Yates to Steuben County when Mr. Jones was a small boy.

When he was 19 years, of age he returned to his native county to acquire a knowledge of the builder's business, which he pursued some years.

He was married in Milo, Yates County, April 20, 1852, to Alvira Miller, and they are the parents of a daughter, Adell M.,—born Feb. 18, 1855.

She is well educated and has been engaged in teaching in Hersey and vicinity.

Mrs. Jones is the daughter of Daniel and Susan Miller, and was born Dec. 23, 1827, in Yates Co., N. Y.

In the spring of 1865 Mr. Jones became a resident of Matherton, Ionia Co., Mich., where, in company with George Lance, he rented a building and put in a sash, door and blind factory, which they managed jointly three years.

At the end of that time Mr. Jones sold his interest to-his partner, on account of impaired health.

He established his residence at Hersey in the spring of 1871 and brought his family hither in the fall of the same year.

His first business venture was in the management of a planing-mill for D. A. Blodgett, which he conducted four and a half years.

His further operations as a mechanic were interrupted by an accident received from one of the saws in the mill, which deprived him of his left hand.

He was appointed Postmaster of Hersey in January, 1884.

All the members of the family belong to the Baptist Church.

 

Frank A. True, jeweler at Evart, was born Sept. 27, 1855, at Flint, Mich.

His father, William W. True, is a native of Montrose, Pa., and has been in the business of a silversmith about 35 years, and is still engaged in it at Flint.

His mother, Rowena (Blair) True, was born in Vermont, and is still living.

Mr. True entered his father's store when he was 13 years of age, to learn the business, and was engaged in the acquisition of its details until he was 20.

He had meanwhile obtained an excellent education, which he completed at the schools of higher grade.

In 1875 he went to Cleveland to enter upon the duties of foreman in the jewelry establishment of Jerry W. Coon, where he operated one year.

In 1876 he came to Evart and bought the business of William Livingston, and has since prosecuted the trade in his line with success.

He deals in watches, jewelry, plated ware and all articles suited to his trade.

His stock averages an estimated value of $4,000, and he transacts a considerable business in repairs.

In February, 1884, he founded a branch store at Meredith, which is conducted by his brother, Charles E. True.

The stock at that point is valued at $2,000.

Mr. True was married Oct. 15, 1879, at Evart, to Harriet A., daughter of Hon. John C. Dexter.

She was born Feb. 23, 1852, in Ionia, Mich., died June 29, 1880, at Evart, and is buried at Ionia.

 

John B. McFarlane, lumberman and farmer, section 2, Sylvan Township, was born July 9, 1835, in Beauharnais Co., Quebec.

Andrew McFarlane, his father, was a native of 'W Scotland, and came to America soon after his marriage to Jane Bryden, settling in the Dominion of Canada.

Later he came to Lapeer Co., Mich., where he died, about the year 1869.

The mother was born in Ireland, and is still living, in Lapeer County, aged 82 years.

They had 10 children.

Mr. McFarlane has been a resident of the Peninsular State since the age of 12 years.

His first labor was in the lumber woods at Mill Creek, Lapeer County, in the employ of Wm. Ellison.

Subsequently he went to Wisconsin and later to Minnesota, where he was occupied in lumbering. In 1854 he made a trip down the Mississippi River on a raft of logs, stopping at Vicksburg.

He commenced operations there as a wagon-maker, which business he prosecuted until the secession of the State.

He was one of the first to enter the Confederate service as a measure of policy and safety, and enlisted in Co. I, 20th Miss. Vol. Inf., known as the "Jasper Rifles," under Colonel Russel, General Floyd, Brigade Commander.

He was in active service until the fall of Fort Donelson, when he was taken prisoner and sent to Camp Douglas, Chicago.

He made his escape from that place by scaling its walls, and returned to Lapeer County, glad to find himself once more under the protection of the Stars and Stripes, and with no love for the Confederacy.

Soon after his return he came up the Muskegon River and resumed his wonted occupation as a lumberman in the interests of Green & Mason, of Mecosta County.

He was married in 1864, and, with his wife, went to Wisconsin.

From there he returned a few months later to Osceola and Mecosta Counties, where he has since operated extensively in timber lands and in lumbering as a jobber and contractor.

He was engaged some years in the manufacture of lumber at Evart, but the crisis of 1873 caused such a shrinkage of values that it crippled his business at that point of operation.

He is the owner of 4,000 acres of land situated in various portions of Osceola County, which includes 220 acres of improved land, nearly all of which is comprised in the homestead estate.

Mr. McFarlane is a Republican in political preferences.

He was one of the first Supervisors in Osceola County, and has officiated in that position two years in Middle Branch Township.

He was married March 20, 1864, in Barton Township, Newaygo County, to Hattie S. Marsh.

They have had six children,—Archibald L., St. John, Edmond P., Aloney C., an infant (deceased) and Winnie M.

Mrs. McFarlane was born Jan. 7, 1846, in Dundee, Monroe Co., Mich.

She is the daughter of Carlos Marsh, a native of Vermont, and the first permanent settler in Barton Township, Newaygo County.

He died in Middle Branch, June 25, 1879.

The mother, Phoebe Ann (Palmer) Marsh, is still living.

 

Theron F. Nix, photographer at Evart, was born May 1, 1848, in Bleeker Township, Fulton Co., N. Y., and is the son of Frederick and Etta (Heidner) Nix.

He was reared on a farm and obtained his education chiefly by attending school during the winter seasons.

He left the shelter of the parental roof at the age of 20, and was variously occupied at Milwaukee and Manistee five years.

In July, 1879, he came to Evart and purchased the business of Eli Wightman, photographer.

His business has been prosperous from the outset. He owns his residence and the lot connected on Oak Street.

His marriage to Cynthia M. Bauslaugh occurred at Paris, Ontario, May 22, 1883.

They have a daughter – Matie – born March 8, 1884.

Mrs. Nix is the daughter of Henry and Maria Bauslaugh, and was born in Paris, Brant County, Ontario.

Mr. Nix belongs to the order of Odd Fellows.

 

Rufus F. Morris, farmer, section 32, Richmond Township, was born Feb. 8, 1827, in Medina Co., Ohio.

His father and mother, John and Sally (Jennings) Morris, were born respectively in Virginia and Ohio.

On the event of their marriage they settled in Medina County, subsequently resided in various counties and both died in Geauga Co., Ohio.

They had eight sons and four daughters.

Mr. Morris is the oldest son, and during the years of his life until he was 22 he attended the schools of the Buckeye State and labored on his father's farm.

The subsequent year he worked in a grist-mill, spending the year following in working the homestead farm on shares.

He conducted a rented farm one year, and in 1854 came to Allegan Co., Mich., and bought 80 acres of land, on which he was occupied in agricultural pursuits until the fall of 1862.

On selling out he came to Osceola County and entered a claim of Government land in Richmond Township.

On this he has since resided with the exception of nearly four years while discharging the duties of the Office of County Treasurer, when he was a resident of Hersey village.

He owns about 50 acres of his original purchase and has cleared and placed under excellent tillage about 30 acres.

Mr. Morris adheres to the principles upon which was grounded the National Greenback political organization.

He was elected County Treasurer in 1869 and served one term and part of a second.

He has been Supervisor of Richmond Township two years, and has held in succession nearly all the positions of trust pertaining to the control of local township affairs.

Mr. Morris is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

His marriage to Esther Hazen took place Nov. 11, 1852, in Geauga Co., Ohio.

Four children were born to them: Francis, John, Elnora and George F.

The first named died when but three weeks old.

Mrs. Morris was born Feb. 27, 1834, in Geauga Co., Ohio, and is the daughter of Francis W. and Polly (Giles) Hazen.

She is the third child of six born to her parents.

In 1862 the shadow of a dread calamity fell upon the happy and united household.

The mind of the wife and mother became unsettled and for three months her reason left its high citadel.

She was taken to the asylum at Kalamazoo, whence she returned to her home perfectly restored, as was hoped and believed.

In the fall of 1870 the cloud again lowered over her intellect.

She was again removed July 22, 1871, to Kalamazoo, and the same experience has been repeated over and again.

She returns at intervals to her home and hope is again lighted, but in a brief time the darkness and unrest of unbalanced reason again hold her in their grasp, and she is conveyed to the asylum, where she receives every tender consideration that can be brought to bear for her welfare.

In 1873, Elnora, in the promise of her late girlhood, became similarly afflicted, and finds with her mother a retreat at Kalamazoo, where all that skill and patient treatment can devise for her recovery is being done.

It is a merciful decree of Almighty God that the clouded intellect experiences little of realization of its own misfortune.

 

Leonard Reed, farmer, section 22. Lincoln Township, is a son of Truman and Lucy (Hicks) Reed, who were natives of the State of Vermont, married and settled in New York State, and came to Michigan about the year 1846, first settling in Washtenaw County.

They afterward made their, residence in various counties in this state.

Mr. Truman Reed died at the residence of his son Leonard in Osceola County, Dec. 23, 1876; his widow is still living.

Of their family of eight children the subject named at the head of this sketch was the eldest.

He was born in Erie Co., N. Y., Oct. 18, 1832, and has resided in Michigan since he came hither with his parents.

He came to this county in the fall of 1867, taking possession of 80 acres of land where he now resides.

Here he settled and began improvement, with a view to making a desirable home.

He now has 30 acres in good tillable condition.

Sometime after his purchase of the land he disposed of 40 acres.

Mr. Reed has held the office of Highway Commissioner, School Director for nine consecutive years, and School Inspector.

In his views of national affairs he is a Republican, and both he and wife are members of the Disciples' Church.

The marriage of Mr. Reed took place April 6, 1851, in Berrien Co, Mich.

His wife, Mary A., was born June 2, 1832, in. Brown Co., Ohio, and is a daughter of John and Elizabeth Hanover.

(See sketch of John Hanover.)

Mr. and Mrs. Reed have nine children, namely: Mary E , Rose, Frank, Wesley F., Ida, Walter, Lena, Clyde and Charles.

 

Newton Crocker, Postmaster at Reed City, was born March 23, 1836, in Lockport, N. Y. Joseph Crocker, his father, was a native of Cape Cod, Mass., and was born in 1801.

He married Sarah Pomeroy, who was born in 1806 in Hamilton, N. Y.

Their family comprised six children, of whom Mr. Crocker of this sketch was third in order of birth.

They were named Charles, Daniel P., J. Newton, Hannah, Orpha and Robert L.

Their father died in Lockport.

Mr. Crocker was reared on the paternal homestead, and on reaching his majority acceded to the possession of 60 acres of the farm where he had passed the previous years of his life.

He came to Michigan in March, 1867, and began business as a stave and heading manufacturer in the village of Allegan, in the county of the same name.

He operated at that point four years. In December, 1-872, he transferred his interests to Reed City, and, associated with Henry Lonsbury, founded a grocery and provision trade, their relation existing one year.

On its termination, he became a salesman with R. B. Simpson, and was occupied in that capacity about three years.

He received the appointment of Postmaster in September, 1877, and has conducted the business of the position with satisfaction to the general public.

He was elected Justice of the Peace in the spring of 1873, and in his position as magistrate is engaged in the transaction of a large amount of business.

He owns the post office building and the lot where it is located, also two tenant houses.

Mr. Crocker is a member of the Odd Fellows Order.

He was a member of the Village Board for four years upon the first organization, and upon the resignation of Charles Clark as President of the village, he was appointed by the Board to fill the vacancy.

He served two terms as Township Clerk and one as Village Assessor, and for four years was agent for the American Express Company, while acting as Postmaster and Justice of the Peace; and was also a member of the School Board upon the organization of the district.

He was married Jan. 8, 1862, at Lockport, to Thankful Stedman.

They have had three children: Joseph, who was born Aug. 6, 1863, and is a mail agent on the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad; Lena, who was born July 21, 1866; and Valie, who was born Sept 9, 1876, and died Feb. 4, 1881.

Mrs. Crocker is the daughter of Ferrand and Thankful Stedman, and was born in Newfane, Niagara Co., N. Y.

 

John Finkbeiner, dealer in general merchandise at Hersey, and sewing-machine agent, was born Dec. 5, 1842, in Wurtemberg, Germany, and is the son of Daniel and Agnes Finkbeiner.

He was reared to agricultural pursuits in his native country, and in 1868 emigrated to the United States.

On landing he proceeded directly to Hersey, and on arriving obtained employment as a farm assistant two months, after which he engaged as a clerk in various establishments.

In the spring of 1874 he instituted the business enterprise in which he has since been interested.

His stock includes dry goods, groceries, sewing-machines and other merchandise suited to the demands of his patrons.

He is agent of the Howe, American and Victor Companies, and has a fine trade.

Mr. Finkbeiner was married June 16, 1874, at Hersey, to Elizabeth Balzer.

They have had six children, namely; William, Julia and Albert are deceased; the surviving children are John, Ezra and Emma.

Their mother is a native of Canada.

Mr. Finkbeiner owns his store and lives over his sales-rooms.

He is the owner of four village lots.

He is a member of the Village Council, and with his wife, belongs to the Evangelical Church.

 

Frank S. Postal, of the firm of F. S. Postal Bro., proprietors and managers of the Evart House, located at Evart, Mich., was born Oct. 8, 1843, in Avon Township, Oakland Co., Mich., and is the son of William F. and Eliza (Gray) Postal.

His father was born near Bath, Genesee Co., N. Y., April 6, 18i7, and resides with his son at Evart.

The mother was born Sept. 23, 1817, in the same place, and died Jan. 17, 1880, in Sterling, Macomb Co., Mich.

Four of their children are living: Charles was drowned when two years old; Wellington resides at Evart, and is employed by his brother; Frank S. is third in order of birth; George is deceased; Augusta is the wife of Philo Hamlin, a miller in Paris, Mich.; Thomas is deceased, and Fred is associated with his brother in the management of the Evart House.

When he was 25 years old, Mr. Postal owned a farm containing 80 acres in Sterling, Macomb County, on which he resided three years and which he partially improved, putting it in fine condition.

In November, 1871, he sold the place and came to Evart.

The hotel of which he is now the owner was then in process of erection by James H. and Willard G. Trowbridge and Bela Davis.

He bought the interest of the latter, and the house continued under the management of Trowbridge Brothers & Postal eight years.

In 1878 Mr. Postal purchased the entire property, which he conducted singly until August, 1882, when he formed his present business relation with his brother.

They have greatly increased the facilities and accommodations, which are now adequate for the comfort and welfare of nearly 100 guests.

The fixtures of the house are in every way calculated to meet the requirements of the traveling public and patrons.

The hotel is the leading establishment of its class at Evart, and controls the traveling patronage.

There are stables in connection with every appurtenance for caring properly for 50 horses, and there are first-class barber and bath rooms attached.

Mr. Postal is a member of the Evart Land Company, which is doing an extensive local business in real estate, and also in the Upper Peninsula, in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Canada.

The office of the company is in the Evart Bank Block, adjoining the hotel and the firm transacts a large amount of business both in their own property and on commission.

Mr. Postal is also connected with the Northwestern Casket Company, located at Minneapolis, where the firm have a large factory for the production of undertakers' merchandise, and employ two traveling salesmen.

He is the owner of a considerable amount of real estate at Evart, comprising two dwellings and lots in the western part of Evart, the site of the skating rink and two stores on the southwest corner of Main and Seventh Streets, in Osceola Township, also 640 acres of land on section 5, 80 acres on section 35, Hartwick Township, 80 acres, section 36, Osceola Township, 40 acres on section 13, Evart Township, and 80 acres in Antrim County, near Mancelona.

Mr. Postal is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Royal Arch Chapter, and Pilgrim Commandery at Big Rapids.

He was married March 22, 1883, to Ellen Wright, a native of Durham Township, Grey Co., Canada.

A son—James R.—was born to them in Evart, March 5, 1884.

 

Frederick Kaphaem, farmer, section 33, Richmond Township, was born December 2, 1830, in Germany, his parents, John and Henrietta Kaphaem, being also natives of the same country, where they passed the entire course of their lives.

When 23 years of age, in 1853, he emigrated from his native land to the Dominion of Canada, where he was a resident 20 years, engaged in farming.

In the fall of 1873 he came to Osceola County and became a land-holder in Richmond Township, by the purchase of 80 acres of land on section 33, on which he has expended his energies to the best purpose, and has placed 50 acres already under a good order of cultivation.

He was married June 24, 1855, in Erie Co., N. Y., to Ida Oberlin, and they have had eight children —Minnie, Charles, William, John, Wesley and David.

Two children died in infancy.

Mrs. Kaphaem was born in Germany.

She and her husband are members of the Evangelical Association.

 

Joseph W. Ash, farmer, section 6, Lincoln Township, is a son of George and Mahala (Bradley) Ash, natives of Canada, who married and settled in Niagara Co., N. Y., where Mr. Ash, senior, was born May 25, 1800, and died Nov. 9, 1S39.

His widow, after his death, was married to Joseph Cardinal, moved to Osceola County, and died in Lincoln Township, April 18, 1880.

By her first marriage she was the mother of three children, and by the last, of two, namely: Joseph W., Elizabeth A., Hiram L., Huldah C. and George D., -in the order here named.

Mr. Ash, the first of the above mentioned children, was born July 22, 1830, in Niagara Co., N. Y., and received his education mostly in the common schools of his native State.

When he came of age he learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, which he followed until the year 1868.

In 1853 he came to Michigan and settled in DeWitt, Clinton County, and a year afterward he removed to St. John's, that county; and three years still later he went to Kansas with an emigration company, where, in company with several others, he laid out the village of Geneva, Kan.

After remaining with them about a year, he returned to Niagara Co., N. Y., and a year later to St. John's, Mich., where he resided until 1868.

Then he came to this county and took possession of 80 acres of land in Ashton, under the provisions of the homestead laws.

It was the east half of the southeast quarter of section 4, which is now the principal portion of the site of the village of Ashton.

He platted the town in company with Simeon Vanakin and Spencer Preston.

In 1875 he purchased 80 acres of land on section 6, where he has since lived and at present has about 40 acres in a good state of cultivation.

As a man of executive talent and well adapted to serve his fellow citizens in a public capacity, Mr. Ash has been entrusted with the office of Supervisor eight years, and that of Sheriff of the county in 1871-2.

He has also taken an active and prominent part in all the educational interests of his community.

In all matters pertaining to the welfare of the neighborhood, township and county, he is consulted by those who know him, with great confidence in his foresight and judgment.

He has also held the office of Notary Public for a period of eight years, and from 1875 to 1880 he was President of the Osceola County Agricultural Society.

He was Postmaster at Ashton from 1872 to 1876.

Politically he is identified with the Republican Party, and religiously with the Methodist Episcopal Church, as is also his wife.

He was married in Lewiston, Niagara Co., N. Y., July 3, 1853, to Eliza A. Leggett, daughter of Elijah Leggett, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War.

She was born in Porter, Niagara Co., N. Y., April 6, 1835.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Ash are seven in number, namely: Zoa E., George F., Mabel (who died in infancy), Glen E., Delia A., Eddie E. and Alta M.

 

Sylvester Ross, farmer, section 21, Hersey Township, was born May 14, 1852, in Norwich, Oxford Co., Ont.

His father, Hopkins Ross, was born April 6, 1808, and married Mary Mustard for his first wife.

She has been dead more than 20 years, and the senior Ross is now living with his second wife in the township of Hersey.

He is a farmer and carpenter, and has passed many years in the prosecution of these callings.

Mr. Ross of this sketch came to Osceola County with his father in 1864.

In April, 1876. he settled on the place he now occupies.

He has been engaged in lumbering, and has operated several years as foreman of a lumber camp. He is a Republican in political convictions and action.

He was married May 14, 1878, to Eva M. Cutter, and they have three children, born as follows: Florence J., March 16, 1879; Sylvester R., Jan. 9,1881; Adelbert Clyde, Aug. 10, 1883.

Mrs. Ross was born Feb. 25, 1855, in Richburg Township, Allegany Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of William O. and Matilda B. (Satterlee) Cutter.

Her father was born April n, 18n1, and died July 1, 1880, in the village of Stanwood, Mecosta Co., Mich.

Her mother was born in Allegany Co., N. Y., April 17, 1826, and is living with her daughter, Mrs. Ross.

Their family consisted of four children.

One daughter died when she was four years of age. William B. Cutter and Adelbert S. Cutter are living.

Mr. Ross is one of seven children born to his parents,—William Hopkins, Nelson A., Mary J. and Sarah J. (twins), Sylvester, Daniel (deceased) and Martha M.

 

Jacob J. Reik, liveryman and dealer in lumber, horses, buggies and real estate, at Evart, was born July 11, 1849, in Seneca Co., Ohio.

His father, Welch Reik, was born in Germany, also the native place of Jacob's mother, Regina, nee Librandt.

They became the parents of eight children.

In 1852 the family removed to Coldwater, Mich., where the father bought 80 acres of land, on which they were resident five years.

In 1857 they removed to the village of Coldwater, and the father opened a grocery trade, in which he operated about ten years.

The mother died in Coldwater in 1866.

Mr. Reik's father is a member of his family, and is aged 78.

On attaining size and understanding sufficient, Mr. Reik entered his father's store as an assistant, in which capacity he aided until the business terminated.

At the age of 13 he established a grocery business on his own responsibility at Branson, Branch County, which he conducted four years.

He then entered Hillsdale College to secure a satisfactory education, and was a student there three years.

In the fall of 187 1 he came to Evart and opened a bakery and grocery together, which he continued to prosecute eight years.

In 1879 he established the livery business, and gradually, as opportunity has served, has added the other lines of traffic in which he is engaged.

He owns several farms, including 180 acres of land, with about 80 acres under cultivation.

He raises horses, making specialties of the breeds known as Magna Charta and Hambletonian.

In his real-estate transactions he buys and sells pine and farming lands.

Mr. Reik is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and belongs to Lodge No. 320, at Evart.

He was married Nov. 23, 1877, at Evart, to Isadora Pepper.

They have one son—Charles M., born at Evart, Oct. 13, 1881.

Mrs. Reik is the daaghter of Charles and Nancy Pepper, and was born near Detroit, in Wayne Co., Mich.

 

Luther M. Tozer, farmer, section 6, Richmond Township, is a son of Benj. N. and Jedediah (Woodworth) Tozer, who were natives of the Green Mountain State.

His father was a Captain of the war of 18i2, and took part in the battle of Lake Champlain.

After the close of that war he removed to Canada, where he spent the remainder of his life.

He had six children.

The gentleman whose name heads this sketch was born in the Dominion of Canada, Nov. 18, 1819.

He emigrated to the State of New York, lived there awhile and also in other States of the Union until the fall of 1867, when he came to Osceola Co., Mich., and, under the provisions of the Homestead Laws, took possession of 80 acres of land on section 6, where he has since lived and now has about 50 acres in a fine state of cultivation.

Mr. T. has served his fellow citizens in the capacity of Commissioner of Highways; in political matters he is a Republican, and both he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

He was married in Canada, Feb. 12, 1850, to Fanny E. Clayton, who was born in New Brunswick, Oct. 11, 1826.

Her parents, Archibald and Zilpah Clayton, were also natives of the same province.

Mr. and Mrs. Tozer have been the parents of seven children, namely, Eusebia L., Morland \V., Emily B., Eunice M., Benjamin N., Luther E. and William H.

The last named died when he was five and a half years of age.

 

Wilfred V. Harrington, farmer, section 28, Lincoln Township, is a son of William and Miranda (Adams) Harrington, both of whom were natives of Rutland Co., Vt.

Soon after their marriage in that State they removed to Niagara Co., N. Y., and in 1840 to Jackson Co., Mich., where she died, Nov. 7, 1856, and Mr. H. Nov. 13, 1865.

They had a family of n children, namely: Alberto, Caroline, Harriet, Diton, Lerona, Pulaski, Susan, Esther, Irwin, DeKalb and Wilfred V.

The last named, who is the subject of this sketch, was born in Jackson Co., Mich., Nov. 3, 1844; was 12 years old when his mother died, and was then "bound out" by his father for three years to learn the mason's trade.

Soon after he completed his term of apprenticeship, the great civil war was inaugurated by the impetuous "fire-eaters " of the South, and he patriotically concluded that "laying" the insurgents was more important than laying stone, until the insurrection was wholly suppressed.

Accordingly, in July, 1861, he joined the First Mich. Inf.

This first term of service, however, was comparatively short, and the next year he re-enlisted, in the 11th Mich. Vol. Cav., and served one year, when he was discharged for disability.

After recruiting his physical abilities at home for about five months, he enlisted for the third time, in the cavalry regiment denominated "Merrill's Horse," and served until the last insurgent "laid "down his arms.

He was wounded three different times: first, at the battle of Corinth, by a spent ball, in the left arm: secondly, at Independence, Mo., by a bayonet thrust in the right knee and thirdly, at Eastport, Miss., by a throw from his horse.

The last injury was a serious one.

After receiving his discharge, he returned to Jackson Co., Mich., but his health was so poor that he was unable to prosecute any kind of business for more than a year.

On convalescence he resumed his trade and followed it until 1875, when he came to Lincoln Township, this county, and, in company with John H. Freeland (see sketch of the latter), he bought 80 acres of land where he has since resided.

In company with Mr. F., he owns 70 acres, most of which is under cultivation and in good agricultural condition.

Mr. Harrington has held various public offices in his township, being at present Chairman of the School Board, and has been Constable two terms.

In his views of national policy he acts with the Republicans.

 

Charles L. Gray, senior member of the firm of Charles L. Gray & Co., manufacturers and dealers in lumber and shingles of all grades and lengths, and merchants, at Evart, was born Oct. 22, 1849, in Lancaster, Ohio.

He was reared on a farm near Marion, Linn Co., Iowa, from the age of six to eighteen years.

In the spring of 1871 he came to Evart and entered the employment of Dermont & Co. as a clerk, the firm operating in the same building in which his own business is now transacted.

Later he became a bookkeeper for J. B. & P. C. McFarlane, lumber dealers.

He began to traffic in lumber products, and eventually was admitted to a partnership in the lumber firm of Davis, Berry & Co.

A year later this association was succeeded by a partnership bearing the present style, which was followed by the firm of McFarlane & Gray, a relation which existed about two years, when the present business connection was established, its members being Charles L. Gray, B. G. Colton and William Latta.

Their mills are located at Evart, Hartwick and Sunrise Lake.

The capacity of the two last named is 125,000 shingles daily, and about 5, 000 clapboards.

They employ about 7 5 men.

Previous to forming his present business relations, Mr. Gray was interested in the firm of Gray & Spires in the manufacture of lumber, shingles, etc.

He is a member of the firm of Gray & Curtis, lumber and shingle manufacturers at Evart, their works being capable of producing 25,000 feet of lumber daily, 35,000 shingles and 2,000 broom-handles.

They employ 20 men and run a planing-machine in connection with the mill.

Mr. Gray is a member of the Evart Land Company, which is engaged in the transaction of general real-estate business in the interests of its members and on commission, and control large tracts of land in Michigan and in Canada, Wisconsin and Minnesota.

The firm includes F. S. Postal, J. C. Creith, Allen Campbell and C. L. Gray.

This is one of the stanchest real-estate business houses in Northern Michigan, and has an enviable and wide repute for reliability.

The warehouses of the business concerns with which Mr. Gray is connected are located at Evart, near the depot.

His individual property includes his residence and about 3,000 acres of fine farm lands.

He also owns an exceptionally good farm of 80 acres on section 14, Evart Township.

Mr. Gray is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

He has served three terms as a member of the Village Board of Evart, one term as Township Clerk, and three terms as Township Treasurer.

In 1880 he acted as Census Enumerator of Evart Township.

Mr. Gray was married Oct. 19, 1872, at Evart, to Charlotte M. Bennett, and they now have three children: William L., born Oct. 11, 1874; Blanche L., April 20, 1877; and Elizabeth T., Dec. 6, 1880.

Mrs. Gray was born June 16, 1849, near Montreal, Can.

 

Joseph H. Jenkins, farmer, section 20, Hersey Township, was born Dec. 10, 1831, in Parma Monroe County, New York.

His father, John Jenkins, was born March 17, 1795, in Pennsylvania, and was of Yankee extraction.

He was a farmer and mechanic, and followed those callings jointly all his active life.

He married Catherine Whitaker, and in 1835 moved to Northfield, Washtenaw Co., Mich., where he bought 120 acres of land and resided eight years.

In 1843 he sold the place and bought 220 acres of land in Portland, Ionia Co., Mich., where he died, March 17, 1856.

The mother of Joseph H. was born Feb. 28, 1798, in the State of New York, descendant of German ancestors.

She died in Clinton Co., Mich., at the home of her son.

They had seven children, - Palmer, Philetus, Sylvester L., Joseph H., Margaret, Catherine and Sally A.

Mr. Jenkins was the custodian of his parents during the latter years of their lives, and when he came to Osceola County for the benefit of his health in 1877 he transferred the care of his mother to another brother.

He reached Hersey village in January of the same year named, and rented a house for three months.

At the end of that time, early in April, 1877, he bought the farm which he has since occupied.

It comprised 120 acres, with a small clearing of four acres, a log barn and a shanty for shelter.

He has cleared in eight years 65 acres, built an excellent frame house and has fitted the place with modern fixtures, including a wind-mill.

He is a Democrat in political connection and opinions, and has been Highway Commissioner three terms.

He was married Sept. 16, 1857, to Mary A. Kinney.

They became the parents of two children. A son was born Sept. 9, 1858, and died when three days old.

Emma A. was born Dec. 10, 1859, in Portland, Ionia County, Michigan, and was married Dec. 25, 1879, to Albert Sturdevant, and resides at home.

The mother was born Aug. "28, 1839, in DeWitt Township, Clinton Co., Mich., and is the daughter of Fernando C. and Huldah (Clark) Kinney.

The mother died April 4, 1875, Portland.

She was born in 1818, in Rutland Co., Vt.

The father was born May 1, 1812, in Cleveland, Ohio, and resides in the township of Hersey.

Mrs. Jenkins is the oldest of her parents' children. Sarah, Sylvester, Delilah, Jerome and Hattie are the names of her brothers and sisters.

 

Charles H. Coles, jeweler at Reed City is the son of William F. Coles.

The latter was born July 31, 1821, near the city of Rochester, New York, and married Celestia L. Harries, a native of Heath, Massachusetts, where they were married January 17, 1858.

Oliver Coles, father of William F., was a native of Belchertown, Mass., and married a native of the same place, who died in Pembroke, New York, aged 68 years.

Her husband was a farmer and died in Bedford, Mich., when he was 68 years old.

Mr. Coles is one of four children, three of whom are living. Jennie C. married Luman Foote, a farmer in Charlotte, Mich; Charles is next in order of birth; William H. is deceased; Katie C. is the youngest and only daughter.

The family came, when Mr. Coles was six years of age, to Union City, Branch Co., Mich., where they resided two years.

The father was in the jewelry business for 40 years, and taught the trade to his son in all its details.

The latter came to Reed City, Jan. 28, 1882, and opened his present establishment.

He has the leading jewelry business in town, and deals in all articles common to the traffic.

His stock is valued at an estimate of $3,500.

Mr. Coles is a member of the Sons of Industry.

His father removed with his family to Reed City in the fall of 1883.

 

Joseph Ellis, farmer, section 16, Hersey Township, was born Jan. 11, 1816, in Colchester, Chittenden Co., Vt., and is the son of Andrew and Hannah (Mack) Ellis.

The family included eight sons and two daughters.

The father and two sons—William and Lyman— were soldiers in the war of 1812, and were in the battle of Plattsburg.

The others were named Cornelius, Andrew, Apollos, Freeman, Mary and Hannah.

The parents died in Essex, Chittenden Co., Vt., aged respectively 82 and 62 years.

Two of the sons made their way to Ohio, one of them traversing the entire distance of 700 miles on foot.

At 16 years old Mr. Ellis left home and obtained employment during the summer of 1832 on the Erie Canal, and in the fall proceeded to Erie Co., Ohio, where he joined his brothers.

He worked by the month for one of them for a year, when he learned the business of a cooper, which was his occupation for 40 years, working at it from 1834 to 1854 in the Buckeye State.

In the year last named he removed to Woodbridge Township, Hillsdale Co., Mich., owning a farm there he purchased before leaving Ohio. He was a resident there 21 years, working as a cooper and improving his land.

At the time he took possession, there were three acres chopped and the clearing contained a plank house.

The remainder of the tract was in a wild condition.

In 1865 Mr. Ellis sold the place and bought another, two miles distant.

He occupied the latter farm until 1872, when he sold it and bought a residence in the city of Hillsdale.

Three years later he made an exchange of his house and lot for 148 acres of land in Hersey Township.

The place comprised 20 acres of cleared land; 30 acres chopped, and was supplied with a log house and barn.

Mr. Ellis is a Republican, and while resident of Woodbridge was Township Treasurer.

Owing to deafness he has never held office in Hersey Township.

He was married Sept. 21, 1844, to Emmeline Pearl.

Their children were born as follows: Burton J., Dec. 26, 1846; Ida, Nov. 10, 1848; Edward, March 10, 1851; Dora, Dec. 1,1858. Mrs. Ellis was born Dec. 16, 1821, in Berlin Township, Erie Co., Ohio, and is the daughter of Oliver and Mary (Sexton) Pearl.

Her mother was born in Connecticut, and died in Ohio, May 15, 1884, aged 88 years and five months.

Her father was born in Ellington, Tolland Co., Conn., Dec. 5, 1796, and died in May, 1835.

Their children were Oliver S., Ansel H., William, Albert, Addison H., Jerome, Mary A., Marilia M., Harriet and Mrs. Ellis, who was fifth in order of birth.

 

James G. Robbins, farmer, section 34, Richmond Township, was born March 12, 1818, in Tompkins Co., N. Y., and is the fourth son of David and Mary (Burleigh) Robbins.

His parents were born in Connecticut and had a family of nine children.

Mr. Robbins was a resident of the State of New York through his youth and early manhood, removing when 23 years of age to Potter Co., Pa.

In May, 1835, after a residence in the Keystone State of 14 years, he came to Big Prairie Township, Newaygo County, Mich.

In February, 1856, he bought 160 acres, of land, a part of which has since constituted his homestead.

He is the owner of 69 acres of the original tract, and has 55 acres under cultivation and improvements.

Mr. Robbins is a Republican in political bias and has been Township Clerk, Highway Commissioner and Overseer.

His marriage to Olive E. Slade took place in Whitesville, Allegany Co., N. Y., Jan. 17, 1841, and they had eight children, viz.: Nancy M., who married Anson Berger, of Richmond Township (see sketch); Franklin S. (see sketch), Charlotte E., wife of A. McFarlane (see sketch); Ellen, who married John Sims, and died in Richmond Township, in July, 1869; Ada, Mrs. L. F. Gerish, of Duluth, Minn.; Charles W.; Mary, wife of E. C. Baumgardner (see sketch); and an infant who died unnamed.

The oldest daughter is the first white child married in Osceola County, and Mary is the first white girl born in its limits.

 

George Hicks, farmer, section 23, Hersey Township, was born Dec. 2, 1842, in Allegan County, Mich., and is the son of John and Elizabeth (Eady) Hicks.

His father was born May 26, 1793, in Oxfordshire, England, and was a soldier in the British service; he was on the route to America in 1813 to take part in the second struggle between the Colonies and Great Britain, when the vessel foundered on the coast of Newfoundland, and the soldiers were ordered back to England, arriving there seasonably to take part in the battle of Waterloo.

The father came to Canada in 1815, and took up a farm near Ottawa, where he resided until March, 1837, the date of his coming to Michigan.

He first reached Detroit and came thence on foot to Allegan County, where he secured his claim of land from the Government, returning to Canada for his family, whom he brought to this State in 1838.

He died on his farm in Watson Township, Sept. 14, 1877.

The mother was born Jan. 1, 1804, near London, Eng., and died in Trowbridge, Allegan County, in February, 1884.

They had 14 children—Thomas, Mary, Joyce, John, Jane, Elizabeth, Delilah (deceased), Ann, George, Robert (deceased), Hannah, Emily, Robert (2d) and Martha.

On removal to Michigan, the senior Hicks found himself at Detroit with his wife, six children, and one dollar in money.

On leaving the place in Allegan County, where he had built a small log hduse to shelter his family, he had engaged a man to meet him at Detroit with a team, to transport them to their home, but nothing was to be seen of either team or man, and the father, mother and six little ones walked to Battle Creek, a distance of nearly 100 miles, where they met the expected assistance.

Mr. Hicks was educated in the public schools of Allegan County.

When he was 17 years of age he came to Osceola County and engaged in lumbering on the Muskegon River, arriving here in September, 1859.

He combined that vocation with that of a hunter and trapper, in which he became expert and successful.

The avails of the last season in which he was engaged in that line of business, were $1,200.

He left Hersey May 10, 1861, less than a month after the assault on the Federal flag at Fort Sumter, an event that awoke in him a deep interest, to which he gave unmistakable expression by enrolling in the military service of his country.

He enlisted July 29, 1861, in Co. A, 16th United States Infantry.

The command was assigned to the 14th Army Corps, and the regiment was under fire at the first battle" of Shiloh, General Rosecrans, commander.

The brigade included the 16th United States Inf., the Louisville Legions, the 19th United States Inf., and the 6th Indiana.

Mr. Hicks was also in action at Perryville and Stone River, and at Chickamauga sustained two wounds; a bullet passing through one arm above the elbow, and a second through the right side of his neck.

He was captured late in the day of the same action.

The regiment went into battle 700 strong, and at roll-call only one officer and 47 men responded to their names!

The rebels took 42 prisoners belonging to the regiment.

Mr. Hicks was sent to the famous Libby prison at Richmond, whence, after nearly eight months of captivity, he was paroled, May 7, 1864.

The date of his capture was Sept. 20, 1863.

One sacred remembrance of that day was a sight of General Garfield in action on the field.

On being paroled, he came to Annapolis, Md. When he was taken prisoner he weighed 240 pounds, and on reaching Annapolis his weight was only 100 pounds!

After his health and strength were restored he rejoined his regiment, once more taking up arms for the flag, July 26, 1864, his command being stationed near Atlanta, Ga.

He received his final discharge Aug. 9, 1864, the period of his enlistment having expired.

After a brief tarry at his home he went to Helena, Montana Territory, accompanied by his brother.

At St. Cloud, Minn., they bought two yoke of oxen and proceeded to Fort Abercrombie, joining a train en route for Helena.

Arriving there, he engaged in prospecting, in which avenue of occupation he operated six years.

He went north, and his brother took a southerly route.

He found gold to some extent, but not in startling quantities, and in 1872 he made his way back to Osceola County.

He was married March 16, 1873, to Alice A., daughter of Ebenezer and Rosamond (Buttrick) Jones.

Her father was born in 1787,1n New Hampshire, and died in Allegany, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., Aug. 11, 1859.

He was of Welsh descent and was for many years a lumberman on the Alleghany River in the State of New York.

His family removed from the Granite State to Wyoming Co., N. Y., in 1817, before canals or railroads existed, even in imagination, traveling in pioneer wagons with two horse teams.

The mother of Mrs. Hicks was born Oct. 10, 1809, in Hawley, Franklin Co., Mass., and died March 4, 1884, in Hersey Township.

Mrs. Hicks was born Dec. 17, 1849, in Allegany.

Her mother was twice married.

Of the first union, James E., Charles B. and Isabel Humphrey were born.

After she married Ebenezer Jones, she became the mother of Ebenezer, Henry T. and Mary A.

Mr. Hicks is a Republican and a Prohibitionist in political connection and views.

 

Ira H. Whitney, editor and proprietor of the “Union Banter”, published at Reed City, was born in the township of Hartland, Livingston County, Michigan, March 12, 1856.

His parents, John W. and Elizabeth (Davis) Whitney, are still residents of Hartland.

The former is a native of Massachusetts; the latter was born in Rhode Island.

Their family included five sons and three daughters.

Mr. Whitney was occupied in the avenues of employment in which the sons of Michigan farmers are trained, and in the acquisition of his education, until he was 18, and at that age abandoned agriculture in order to put into practical effect a determination to prepare for the career of a printer.

He entered the office of the Milford Times, published at Milford, Oakland Co., Mich.

After becoming familiar with the details of the craft he was made foreman and officiated in that capacity until he went to Ludington in 1883, to take a similar position on the Ludington Record, where he operated about four months.

In 1883 he came to Reed City, and for a few weeks was employed as foreman on the News, when, associated with H. E. J. Clute, he established the journal known as The People.

Its first issue appeared Nov. 24, 1883, and it was managed by Messrs. Whitney and Clute about four months, when they dissolved, and the former, in company with his brother, John M. Whitney, founded the Banner, published in the interest of prohibition principles.

It is a folio of five columns, published weekly, and is steadily growing in influence and popularity.

The marriage of Mr. Whitney to Katie A. Fralick occurred Dec. 20, 1882, at Brighton, Livingston Co., Mich., and they are the parents of one child—Cecil —born April 25, 1884, in Hartland, Livingston County.

Mrs. Whitney was born May 16, 1858, and is the daughter of John and Catherine Fralick, of Brighton, Livingston County.

 

Gardam Wilson, farmer, section 32, Lincoln Township, is a son of Shepard and Elizabeth (Gardam) Wilson, natives of England, who emigrated to Canada in 1832 and lived there the remainder of their lives, Mrs. Wilson dying February 29, 1880 and Mr. Wilson January 19, 1882.

In their family were eight children, namely: Ann, Gardam, Samuel S., Elizabeth, John C., Albert C., and Marietta.

The oldest son and the subject of this sketch was born in Canada, July 7, 1832.

He received a common-school education, which was rather limited; but, being a diligent reader, he has advanced himself to a considerable extent.

He remained at the parental home until about 25 years of age, when he started out into the world for himself.

He first rented a farm, on which he resided for eight years, and then for three years he acted as agent for the Massey Manufacturing Company, of New Castle, Ont.

In February, 1867, he came to Osceola County and took possession of 80 acres of Government land under the regulations of the Homestead Law, in Lincoln Township, and the following autumn he moved his family from Canada to the place, which was then an unbroken wilderness.

Here he commenced the struggles and tedious trials and privations characteristic of frontier life.

He at once built a log house and began the arduous task of clearing his land; and, to know how well he has succeeded, one has to visit his place, as the improvements, the present condition of the farm, and the initial outlines for future advantage are too elaborate for description here.

Of his present possession of 80 acres, about 6o are improved.

His wife also owns 80 acres, on section 30, of which 14 acres are improved.

In reference to political affairs, Mr. Wilson is identified with the Prohibition Party.

He has held the office of Township Clerk one year, School Director two terms, School Inspector three terms, Township Treasurer one year, Supervisor of Lincoln Township 1883-4, and during the latter year was Census Enumerator.

In the fall of 1884 he was nominated on the Prohibition ticket for County Treasurer.

He was Secretary of the first county convention held in Osceola County.

In 1857 Mr. Wilson was licensed to preach the gospel, and during the earlier settlement of this county he was a tireless worker in the cause of Christianity.

He nearly always preached two times each Sunday during his residence in Canada.

Often, after working hard during the week, he would ride 20 miles to fill an appointment; but in the course of time age and enfeebled health forbade such arduous duties in a great measure, and he gradually confined his energies to his farm work.

Both he and his wife have been active and prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church for a great number of years.

Mr. Wilson was married in Ontario, Oct. 7, 1856, to Miss Mary Reed, a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Crawford) Reed.

Her mother died Sept 24, 1883, and her father, still surviving, is a resident of Lincoln Township. Mrs. W. was born in Canada, Dec. 6, 1836.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are seven in number, born as follows: Alice A., Sept. 23i 1S57; Albert G., April 15, 1859; Florence A., Oct. 8, 1860; John J., June 10, 1862; George S., Oct. 29, 1863; Adelia M., June 27, 1867; and Elizabeth M., May it, 1878.

The first mentioned is now the wife of Robert Gamble, and resides in Lake Co., Mich.

 

Benjamin R. Cole, carpenter and joiner, at Reed City, is one of the oldest settlers of Osceola County, of which he became a resident in 1866, when he located on section 6, Richmond Township.

He was born Aug. 11, 1832, in Hornellsville, Steuben Co., N. Y.

His parents, Solomon and Laura (Rathbun) Cole, were natives of the same place, where they were engaged in agriculture.

In 1839 the family removed to Lenawee Co., Mich., and the father bought a farm of 80 acres, and made another removal to a farm in Ottawa County, where he died, Nov. 13, 1849.

The mother died there, June 4, 1864.

When he was 23 years of age Mr. Cole was well settled in life, and was the owner of a farm of 80 acres in excellent agricultural condition, but lost his hard-earned property through dishonest trickery; and, his wife dying about the same time, he decided to enter the army, and accordingly enlisted, July 30, 1861, at Grand Rapids, enrolling in Battery E.

The command was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland. Mr. Cole was in the service until March 18, 1863, when he was discharged as Second Sergeant.

Among his engagements were Mill Springs, Pittsburg Landing, Lookout Mountain and Stone River.

At the last named he was injured by a leap from a wounded horse belonging to his battery, three of his ribs being broken and other injuries resulting, which caused his discharge and disablement for a period of two years.

In 1866 Mr. Cole secured a homestead claim of 80 acres on section 6, Richmond Township, on which he settled June 19 of the same year.

He cleared 70 acres and placed the farm in excellent condition.

He was one of the movers in the separation of Osceola from Mecosta County, and also in the organization of the townships of Lincoln, Sherman and Hersey.

In 1880 he built his residence at Reed City and took possession, where he has since resided.

He belongs to the Masons and to the Grand Army of the Republic.

He is a Republican of decided standing: has officiated as Justice of the Peace four years, as Highway Commissioner six years and eight years as School Inspector.

Mr. Cole was married Dec. 5, 1857, in Grand Rapids, to Sarah A. Camp, and they had two children,—John S., now a herder in Montana Territory, and Zuleika, now deceased.

His wife died in Ottawa County, Mich., and he was again married Oct. 22, 1865, in Hornellsville, N. Y., to Elizabeth Robins.

She was a native of that place, and died Oct. 19, 1880, at Lansing.

Mr. Cole was again married, at Hornellsville, to Jennie Domielson, a native of Hornellsville, where she was born May 1, 1853.

Mr. and Mrs. Cole are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Reed City.

 

Newton S. Gwynne, farmer, section 22, Hersey Township, was-born Jan. 6, 1857, in Kent Co., Mich., and is the son of Thomas and Jane (Saunders) Gwynne.

His parents were both natives of England.

His mother died in Kent County, in 1860; his father entered the military service of the United States, and died of fever in 1864, in a hospital at Nashville, Tenn.

In 1869 the grandparents of Mrs. Gwynne, who were residents of Iowa, disposed of their property there, came to Kent County and removed with him and his only sister to Hersey Township, when they bought the farm now owned by the grandson.

The sister married William Engle and resides at Fisher Station, six miles from Grand Rapids.

The grandfather died July 20, 1881; the grandmother's decease occurred Aug. 20 of the same year.

The former was the guardian and custodian of two farms left to his children by the father of Mr. Gwynne of this sketch.

The latter was married April 12, 1881, to Rosetta, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Saunders) Smith, both of whom reside in Hersey Township.

Mrs. Gwynne was born March 18, 1860, in South Haven, this State.

She has a brother, Franklin S. Smith.

The family is Congregationalist in religious principle.

 

William S. Davis, of the manufacturing firm of Beardsley & Davis, was born March 18, 1846, in Camden, N. J., and is the son of Bartholomew and Hettie (Hunt) Davis.

His father was born in September, 1819, in Maidstone, Kent Co., Eng., and emigrated to this country about 1840.

He went back to England in 1847 with his wife and two children, and returned alone in 185910 Pennsylvania, expecting to send for his family.

His wife died in Maidstone, and the two children, William, a boy of 13, and his sister, aged 11 years, came alone across the ocean.

A friend met them in New York and took them in charge to the city of Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where they joined their father.

The latter now resides on a farm in New Cambria, Mo.

Mr. Davis obtained his education chiefly in the night schools of the section of Pennsylvania where he resided in his youth, and when 14 years old was apprenticed to learn the trade of shoemaker.

After working three years he determined to become a soldier in the Union service, and enlisted in 1863, in the 39th Pa. Vol. Inf., to serve 100 days.

On being discharged from that service he enlisted in Co. A, 12th Pa. Vol. Cav.

The regiment was in the Army of the Shenandoah, under Sheridan, and was in the service at the date of the precipitated flight of Gen.

Early up the Valley of the Shenandoah, and was left at Charleston, Va., when Sheridan joined General Grant on the James River.

Mr. Davis Wjs in battle at Monocacy, Cedar Creek, Winchester and Berryville.

Just before the surrender of Lee the regiment to which Mr. Davis belonged was transferred to Gen. Hancock's Division.

He received his discharge July 17, 1865, and returned to Pottsville, whence he went a few months later to Philadelphia and fitted himself for a machinist and engineer.

He passed two years in his preparations, and followed his trade until he engaged, in 1880, in the manufacture of hoops at Edgerton, Kent County, in which he was occupied one year.

In 1882 he formed a partnership with W. L. Beardsley, in the manufacture of shingles, a relation which still exists.

The mill has a daily producing capacity of 55,000, and as a rule is run nearly to its maximum.

They employ a working force of 22 assistants, including two packers.

Three teams are required to put in logs, and the pine resources will keep the mill operating about two years, or until 1886.

Mr. Davis was married Feb. 9, 1871, to Mary E. Alexander.

Gertie A., adopted daughter, was born Feb. 11, 1870.

Mrs. Davis was born Jan. 31, 1847, and is the daughter of William G. and Amanda (Margrum) Alexander.

Her father is a mechanic. After marriage Mr. Davis was in charge four years of the machinery of the Huntsville Coal Co. in Randolph Co., Mo.

He is a Republican in political sentiment, and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, as also does his wife.

 

John Hanover, farmer, section 28, Lincoln Township, is a son of Isaac and Susan (Marquiss) Hanover.

The parents, who were natives of Pennsylvania, removed after their marriage to Ohio, and spent the remainder of their life there.

In their family were three children, namely, Rebecca, John and William.

The eldest son, the subject of this sketch, was born in Adams Co., Ohio, Nov. 15, 1810.

When very young his father died and the three children were all "bound out" till of age; but John started out in the world to take care of himself when he was 18 years of age.

He worked in various capacities and in different places for nearly four years.

Shortly afterward he bought a farm in Highland County, Ohio, which he carried on about two years.

Some five years later he came to the Peninsular State and settled in Berrien County, where he remained almost 12 years.

He then sold his farm there, spent a short time in Iowa, returned to Berrien County, this State, and, after residing there until the fall of 1865, he came to Osceola County and took possession, under the homestead law, of 80 acres of land in Lincoln Township, where he has since lived.

He now owns 67 acres, and has almost 50 acres improved and in a state of good cultivation.

With regard to national issues, Mr. H. is a member of the Republican Party.

He was married in Brown Co., Ohio, to Elizabeth Marquiss, who is a native of that county, born Jan. 11, 1811.

Mr. and Mrs. Hanover are the parents of 11 children, viz.: Isaac P., Mary A., William H. Cyrenus, Eliza E., Francis M., Charlotte J., John A., Sarah E. and Jacob G. W., who are living, and Lucinda, who died at the age of one year.

 

Milton Moffitt, farmer, section 30, Cedar Township, was born April 2, 1841, in Wayne, Erie Co., Pa., and is the son of Jesse and Dorothy (Wheeler) Moffitt.

His paternal grandparents were Scotch and German by birth, and his father was born in Attica, N. Y.

He was a shoemaker by trade, but passed most of his life in the vocation of farmer.

He was about 50 years of age at the time of his death in 1849.

The mother is yet living, in Pennsylvania.

Mr. Moffitt was reared to the profession of farming in his native State, and on becoming of age learned the blacksmith's trade, which he followed at Corry, Pa., until his removal in 1875 to Osceola Co., Mich.

He rented a farm in the vicinity of Ashton, Leroy Township, which he conducted three years.

In 1878 he bought 80 acres, on which he has since operated.

It was wholly unimproved, and he has placed 20 acres under cultivation.

He is the mail-carrier between Hersey and Penasa, the latter office being stationed in his house.

His wife is the Postmistress.

Mr. Moffitt was married April 8, 1863, to Martha A. Stone, and their children were born as follows: Eva E., Frank A., Dora I., Hubert M. (deceased); Walter G. (deceased), Ernest (deceased), Isaac B., Archie C., Bertie and Daisy.

Mrs. Moffitt was born books (26)

William Horner

William Horner, proprietor of the planning-mill at Reed City, was born in St. Catherines, Ontario, Aug. 23, 1851.

His father, Samuel Horner, was born in 1817 in the North of Ireland, and emigrated to the United States, landing at New York.

He afterward went to Canada, where he taught school, and in the State, of New York more than a score of years.

His mother, Elizabeth (Walker) Horner, was born in 1819, in Ireland, and is now living at Stratford, Ont., with her youngest son.

The ancestral origin of the Horner family dates to the French Huguenots who fled to the North of Ireland to escape religious persecution.

The father of Mr. Horner died at Brockville, Ont., on the St. Lawrence River, when his son was but 11 years old.

He was then under the necessity of contributing to the support of the four young children, who were deprived of the father's care and protection.

After the death of the father the family removed to Baltimore, Md., where Mr. Horner engaged as a telegraph messenger and operator until he was 15 years of age.

They then removed to Stratford, Ont., and he became an assistant in a mercantile establishment, and was occupied in that line of business until he was 19 years of age.

He commenced operating as book-keeper with Scismgeour Bros., of Stratford, continuing in that capacity six years.

In 1877 he went to Desoronto, Ont., and was there employed by H. B. Rathbun & Son, as contractor in their lumber and ship-building interests, in the manufacturing department in which he required the aid of 20 assistants.

In 1880 he went to Warren Co., Pa., in the capacity of superintendent of a wholesale sash, door and blind factory, owned by L. D. Wetmore & Co.

In January, 1882, associated with S. E. Cormany, he bought the site of an old saw-mill at Reed City, containing one and a fourth acres of land.

They removed the ancient structure and rebuilt, constructing a building 65 X200 feet in extent, with a brick engine-house attached.

The producing capacity of the establishment is 60,000 feet daily of matched and planed lumber.

They also manufacture two car loads of boxes weekly and employ an average working force of 15 men.

The partnership existed six months, when Mr. Horner purchased the interest of his partner and later admitted W. W. Foster, the latter association continuing operative until July, 1884, when the entire interest became the property of Mr. Horner by purchase.

The works are being operated at present (1884) to their full capacity, Tuning about 15 hours daily.

The marriage of Mr. Horner to Maggie Pullar took place Dec. 30, 1874, at Stratford, Ont.

Maggie (Pullar) Horner

Their children were born as follows: Samuel, May 28, 1876; Mamie E., Sept. 24, 1878; Anna L., Jan. 12, 1882; and Frank, Feb. 19, 1884.

Mrs. Horner was born Jan. 15, 185 1, in Scotland, and is the daughter of Andrew and Mary Pullar.

 

Willard Gould, farmer, resident on section 5, Hersey Township, was born March 14, 1837, in Percy Township, Northumberland County, Ontario.

His father, Jewett Gould, married Mary A. Park. He connected himself with the Mormons, with whom he was living in Utah when last heard from.

The mother is a resident of Belleville, Ont.

Mr. Gould was reared on the farm of his maternal grandparents.

Before he attained his majority he was apprenticed to a shoemaker for five years, but he found the confinement irksome and the plan was abandoned.

On reaching the age of 21 years he learned the builder's trade, but finding it distasteful he bought a farm in Canada, which he managed eight years.

He sold out in 1869 and came to Lake County in Michigan, where he bought 160 acres of land, and was its occupant seven years.

In 1876 he removed to a tract of land in Hersey Township, which he had purchased while living in Lake County, and two years previous to removal thereto.

He owns 120 acres with 45 acres under excellent improvements.

He is a Republican, and has always been active in the educational matters of his township.

He was married Oct. 31, 1857, in Percy, Canada, to Louis Ireland.

Three of their children are deceased, -Martha E., Alfred S. and Purcilla.

Esther A., William A., John, Charles H. and Mabel C. are living.

Mrs. Gould is the daughter of Isaac and Hester (Tallman) Ireland, both of whom died in Canada.

She was born April 20, 1845, 'n Percy, Ont.

 

Noah Terpenning, farmer, section 18, Richmond Township, is a son of Merenes and Peggy Terpenning.

The latter were natives of Orange Co., N. Y., where they resided for a time after marriage, and then removed to Cortland County, same State; here they lived until their death.

They had a family of nine children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fourth in order of birth.

He was born in Cortland Co., N. Y., Jan. 27, 1820, and remained at home until 25 years of age, when he started out in life for himself.

He occupied and managed a rented farm for nearly 20 years, and then purchased a farm, in the same county, on which he remained till April, 1883, when he came to this county and bought 73 acres of land where he is now making his home. He has all his land cleared and well improved.

He was married in Tompkins Co., N. Y., May 4, 1843, to Miss Christean Butts, who was born Nov. 29, 1821, and whose parents were Michael and Adaline (Searles) Butts, natives of New Jersey.

Mr. and Mrs. T. are the parents of three children, Cyrus, Arthur and John.

The first named is a carpenter and joiner, and resides in Cortland, N. Y.; Arthur is a carpenter and owns a farm and resides in Virgil, same county.

Two of them served in the war of the Rebellion, Cyrus enlisting in Co. I, 122d Reg. N. Y. Infantry serving three years.

He was wounded twice on the same day at the Battle of the Wilderness.

Arthur enlisted in Company F, 182nd Regiment New York Infantry, serving seven months.

Both receive an honorable discharge at the close of the war.

John is a farmer, and is living with his father, having an interest in the farm.

As to political affairs, Mr. T. is a Prohibitionist.

 

Emmet R. White, dealer in drugs, medicines, books, stationery, etc. at Reed City, was born at Elk Creek, Pennsylvania, September 27, 1852, and removed to New York, in 1862, with his parents, Welcome W. and Abbie (Hoard) White.

He went west in 1877, and in 1879 came to Reed City and engaged as a clerk for his brother in the drug store.

He entered the business as a partner in December, 1882.

 

Oscar M. Brownson, dealer in real estate and loans, at Evart, was born August 6, 1826 in Somerset, Niagara Co., N. Y.

His parents, Luman and Lucy (Barbour) Brownson, were natives of Vermont.

The former was born Dec. 26, 1800, the latter, Feb. 5, 1801.

They had five children, of whom Mr. Brownson, of this sketch, is the oldest. Amanda E. married C. C. Farrar, a capitalist of Flint, Mich.

Their children are Lucy D., Frank L. and Edward B. Sopronia L. married Geo. H. Holman, of Flint, a dealer in grain, lime, coal, etc.

They have two children, Arthur B. and Harriet, wife of George Bishop.

Mr. and Mrs. Bishop are both graduates of the High School at Ann Arbor, and are farming in Dakota.

Samuel N. Brownson, second son, is a farmer and stockman in Greenwood Co., Kan.

He married Mattie Adams, of Pontiac, Mich., and they have five children— Edith M., Frank L., Freddie O., Clara and Mabel.

The fifth child in the family of the senior Brownson died unnamed.

Mr. Brownson remained under the paternal roof until he was 25 years of age.

He acquired the education of the common schools in early youth, afterwards passing a year at the famous school at Oberlin, Ohio, and a like period of time in the High School at Romeo, Mich.

After completing his education he began teaching, in which he was occupied eleven terms.

In 1853 he bought a small tract of land containing 40 acres in Oakland County, four miles west of Pontiac, where he devoted his energies to the nursery business, and also engaged in raising fruit, being occupied there 13 years.

At the end of that time he removed to a farm situated eight miles north of Pontiac, on which he was resident four years. In 1869 he went to Flint, where he became interested in the hardware business as a member of the firm of Holman, Farrar & Co.

After four years of business connection with his brothersin-law, Mr. Brownson came to Evart, where he arrived July 1, 1873, and, in company with Robert A. Allured, opened a hardware store.

He erected a brick building for the transaction of their business, and a few months later doubled its capacity by building an addition of the same dimensions, to which he made another addition between three and four years later.

The business relations of Messrs. Brownson & Allured were in existence' about six years, when they were terminated by the sale of the senior partner's interest to his associate, and Mr. Brownson, began to operate in real estate and loans sufficiently to retain his interest in active business life.

He is a Notary Public, and transacts the business common to the position.

He owns 250 acres of farming land in Osceola County, and in 1882 built his fine residence at Evart, and has two village lots connected therewith.

He is also the owner of a tenement house and several village lots, variously located.

Mr. Brownson was married June 19, 1851, in Almont, Lapeer Co., Mich., to Lucy M. Johnson.

They have had two children, only one of whom survives—Alice L., wife of Robert A. Allured (see sketch).

She was born May 25, 1852. Charles H. was born Nov. 8, 1855, and died in the prime of his young manhood, Aug. 16, 1880.

He married Mira Spaulding. Mrs. Brownson was born in Wales Township, Erie Co., N. Y., Jan. 26, 1824, and is the daughter of Samuel and Sally Johnson.

The parents came from the Empire State to Almont in 1834, when that portion of Michigan was in its earliest pioneer period and when the State was in its Territorial days.

Mr. Johnson was born Sept. 20, 1797, in the State of New York. Mrs. Johnson was born Oct. 28, 1793, in Whitehall, N. Y., and died in Almont, Dec. 30, 1865.

Mr. Johnson died in the same place, Feb. 15, 1845.

They had four children.

Dr. Hosmer A., oldest son, was born Oct. 6, 1822.

He has risen to a distinguished position, solely through his own efforts, working his way through the University at Ann Arbor, where he was graduated in 1849, with the degree of B. A.

In 1850 he went to Chicago and entered Rush Medical College, graduating there as one of its most accomplished students.

He is one of the founders of the Chicago Medical College, of which he has been a Professor, since its establishment, and has held the Chair of Physiology.

In 1861 he was made a member of the Board of Medical Examiners for the State of Illinois, of which body he became President.

He married Margaretta A. Seward, niece of Hon. Wm. H. Seward, of distinguished memory.

Mrs. Brownson is the second of her parents' children.

Emmeline L. married E. B. Hough, a farmer of Almont, and died Jan. 25, 1867.

James y F. is a farmer in Kansas.

He married Emma Fish of Flint, sister of a prominent physician of Flint, and of Dr. Fish, of California.

Mrs. Brownson began teaching when 16 years of age, and continued in the profession until 27 years old.

Mr. Brownson is a gentleman of decided moral convictions, and acts fearlessly in consonance with his views.

He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is officiating as a Ruling Elder in that body, to which position he was elected in 1875.

He donated liberally to the building of a church edifice for the benefit of the denomination to which he belongs, and aided personally in its erection.

The entire cost of the structure was $5,000, to which sum Messrs. Brownson and Allured contributed $2,000.

Mr. Brownson is one of the most prominent actors in the cause of Prohibition in the State of Michigan.

He is earnestly interested in the progress of the party as antagonistic to the liquor traffic, and has aided in the organization of eight local prohibition clubs.

He was delegate to two State Conventions of 1884, and to the County Conventions of the same year.

He attended the National Convention held at Pittsburg, July 24, 1884, in the capacity of delegate from his State, and was nominated on the Prohibition ticket of Michigan for Presidential Elector from the Ninth Congressional District.

 

Peter Cody, farmer, section 21, Hersey Township, was born April 4, 1816, in the County Carlow, Ireland, and is the son of James and Mary (Dunne) Cody, both of whom are natives of Ireland.

On June 22, 1830, they sailed from Dublin, with their family, including four sons and six daughters.

All are yet living but two of the latter.

They were born as follows: Mary A., Peter, Hanora (deceased), Margaret (deceased), John, James, Ellen, Bridget, Andrew and Jane.

Their father bought a farm in Simcoe Co., Ont., on which he resided about 15 years, when the place was sold, and another purchased where the family removed, and where the father died.

The township was named Tassarontio.

The mother also died there.

Mr. Cody was in charge of his parents during the last years of their lives.

After they were deceased he bought a farm in the county of Bruce, in the Dominion, where he resided 15 years, coming thence in 1869 to Osceola Co., Mich., where he bought 80 acres of land in a wholly wild state, from the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company, in Hersey Township.

He has cleared and placed 65 acres under culture, has erected a good frame barn, and is rapidly approaching assured competency.

On removal here he left his family at Big Rapids, took possession of his farm Oct. 17, 1869, and built a log house.

He was married Sept. 8, 1843, to Loretto Doyle, and they are the parents of 13 children, born as follows: James, July 15, 1847; Margaret, Dec. 15, 1849; Maria, March 13, 1851; Loretto, Sept. 5, 1852; Elizabeth, May 16, 1854; Peter, Aug. 12, 1855; Bridget, Jan. 18, 1857; Andrew, June 11, 1858; John, June 24, 1860; Daniel, Feb. 2, 1862; Ellen, Oct. 13, 1863; Edmond, June 23, 1865 ; Ann, Feb. 9, 1867.

Mrs. Cody was born about the first of April, 1821, in County Carlow, Ireland, and is the daughter of James and Bridget (Dunn) Doyle.

Her father was born in the same county, and died in Canada.

Her mother was born in Queens Co., Ireland, resides with Mrs. Cody, and is nearly 89 years of age.

They came to America with four sons and two daughters, having buried two sons in their native land.

They are named Daniel, Edward, James, Matthias, Bridget (deceased) and Loretto.

The family are Roman Catholics.

Mr. Cody is a Democrat in political affiliation.

 

Jacob W. Thomas, farmer, section t8, Cedar Township, was born Nov. 11, 1815, in Gettysburg, Pa.

He has been a resident of Osceola County 15 years without intermission, having settled on his farm May 15, 1869.

He entered the claim for his land under the provisions of the Homestead Law.

His father, Charles Thomas, was a stone mason by trade, and descended from Welsh ancestry.

He married Elizabeth Schroder, a German.

Their children were named Hannah, Jacob, John, Susan, Mary, William, Catherine, Elizabeth and Joel.

Mr. Thomas has one sister living, Elizabeth by name.

She resides in Lincoln Township.

The father died in 1844, at the age of 63 years, in Logan Co., Ohio.

The mother died in 1860, in Hardin Co., Ohio, aged 60 years.

They were natives of Pennsylvania.

Mr. Thomas was instructed in farming and in the calling of his father.

He followed the latter business about 40 years before he settled permanently to the vocation of farmer.

His parents removed to Champagne Co., Ohio, when he was 15 years of age, and he accompanied them later to Logan County, and subsequently to Hardin County.

He was married in July, 1842, to Jerusha Hutchinson.

They had two children, only one of whom is living, P. S., born Aug. n, 1844, in Logan Co., Ohio. Ellen was born in 1850.

Mr. Thomas is independent in political opinions and connections.

He is serving his eighth term as Supervisor, in which position he has acted consecutively since 1876, with the exception of the year 1883.

He has discharged the duties of Township Treasurer two years, Highway Commissioner three years, and has been a long time Justice of the Peace.

 

John H. Auer, merchant tailor and Notary Public at Reed City, was born Oct. J6, 1823, in Nickenich Rhein, Prussia.

His parents, Anton and Margaret Auer, were also born in Prussia, and Delonged to the farming community.

In 1837, when he was 14 years of age, and had fulfilled the requirements of the law of his native land in his attendance at school, he entered upon an apprenticeship to acquire a knowledge of the trade of tailor, serving two years, after which he managed his relations in the capacity of a journeyman.

He opened business in his own behalf in the place where he learned his trade, in which he met with success.

He left the land of his nativity in 1854, and came to Schenectady, N. Y., where he engaged with a tailoring house as cutter.

In 1858 he went thence to Perry, Wyoming Co., N. Y., and founded a business in his own interest.

Next he went to Moscow, Livingston Co., N. Y., and established himself there in the same calling.

He went next to Mount Morris, where he remained two years.

In 1863 he came to Almont, Lapeer Co., Mich., where he operated similarly until September, 1868.

Two years previous he came to Lincoln Township on account of ill health, and entered a claim of 80 acres of land on section 32.

In 1868 he abandoned his professional business and removed to his farm, and he operated as a pioneer farmer, made an extensive clearing and resided thereon until his health was re-established and his farm in comparatively fine condition. He is still its proprietor.

In the fall of 1875 he again commenced the pursuit in which he has since been engaged at Reed City.

He is doing an excellent business, which requires several assistants.

Arthur J., his son, acts as operates as traveling salesman.

He owns his place of business, his residence and other village property.

He served four years as Justice of the Peace in Lincoln Township, as Superintendent of Schools of Richmond Township, and as member of the City Council two years.

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Sons of Industry.

The marriage of Mr. Auer took place in Germany, Nov. 22, 1848, Mary Schuld becoming his wife.

Two of their six children were born previous to their emigration to America.

Peter A. is a clerk in the Treasury Department at Washington; Mary married William B. McDonald, a farmer of Lincoln Township; Catherine was born in Schenectady, and married P. T. Morris; Elizabeth married L. C. Dill, station agent at Traverse City; she was born in Schenectady; Henry was born, in Moscow, N. Y., and is clerk in a store at Cadillac; Arthur J. was born in Mount Morris, Dec. 7, 1862.

Their mother died March 24, 1863, in Utica, N. Y.

While living at Almont, Mr. Auer was married at Detroit, Feb. 22, 1866, to Laura Jane White.

She died Jan. 19, 1883, at Reed City. Mr. Auer was again married in April, 1883, to Lena Houseman, born in Baden, Germany.

James H. Drake, farmer, section 18, Lincoln Township, is a son of Cornelius and Polly (Boggs) Drake, who were natives of the State of New York, and had a family of 12 children.

All of these, with the exception of a daughter, grew up to years of maturity.

The subject whose name heads this paragraph is the eldest son and third child in the family of his parents.

He was born in Steuben Co., N. Y., Feb. 1, 1833, made his home with his parents until 29 years of age, and then worked out until the fall of 1857, when he came to Osceola County and took possession of 80 acres of Government land where he now lives, and settled upon it one year later.

At present he has about 32 acres under cultivation, and, is laying well the foundation of a good home.

Mr. Drake is independent in his political views, and has served his community as Overseer of Highways.

Both he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

He was married in Le Roy Township, this county, Dec. 5, 1872, to Miss Mary Boyer, daughter of William and Elizabeth Boyer.

Her father was a native of the State of New York, and her mother of New Jersey.

Mr. and Mrs. D. have one child, Millie L. by name, who was born Jan. 28, i»7S

 

Thomas H. Peacock is the pioneer manufacturer of Reed City, where he located in 1876.

He manufactures and deals in sash, doors, blinds, frames, store fronts, moldings, brackets, dressed lumber, lath, shingles, etc.

His business establishment is situated at the junction of the Grand Rapids & Indiana and Flint & Pere Marquette Railroads, both roads having side-tracks running into the mill and constituting one of the best possible points of shipment, exceeded by no other in Northern Michigan.

When running to their full capacity, the works require 27 assistants.

Mr. Peacock was born Aug. 7, 1847, at Stocktonupon-Tees, county of Durham, Eng.

His parents, Isaac and Jane (Smith) Peacock, are natives of the same shire, and in 1855 emigrated with their family to the United States, settling in Canandaigua, Ontario Co., N. Y.

Their family comprised six children, three of whom survive.

Joseph is a machinist at Shortsville, N. Y.

Sarah is the wife of Frank Jessup, a machinist of Shortsville.

Thomas Peacock had a natural taste for the profession of his father, by whom he was instructed in its details, entering the shop for that purpose when he was 12 years of age.

He soon obtained a practical knowledge of it, which he perfected at Silby's Island Works at Seneca Falls, N. Y., remaining there three years to complete his apprenticeship in his chosen business.

Previous to his 17th birthday he entered the military service of the United States, enlisting Sept. 6, 1864, at Canandaigua, in Company K, Second New York Cavalry, and was mustered in as Sergeant.

Immediately upon going to the front he became acting Sergeant-Major.

His regiment was assigned to the First Brigade and Third Division, commanded by General Custer, under whom Mr. Peacock passed the entire period of his military life.

He was first in action at Cedar Creek, where his regiment was in a position next the “right front."

The cavalry charge of Oct. 19, 1864, is one of the most celebrated events of the Civil War, and Mr. Peacock was a participant in the action in which it is recorded that Sheridan snatched victory from defeat and drove the Confederates from the Shenandoah Valley.

He was also in the fights at Five Forks and at Dinwiddie CourtHouse, and was present at the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox Court-House.

Besides the prominent actions in which the cavalry was engaged, it was in almost unintermitted skirmish fighting and deploy duty, and participated in the final Grand Review at Washington, D. C.

Mr. Peacock received his discharge at Alexandria, Va., July 26, 1865.

The family of Mr. Peacock, senior, remained in Ontario Co., N. Y., until 1872, the father operating as a machinist and manufacturer of agricultural implements.

After the return of Thomas Peacock from the war, he proceeded after a short delay to Jonesville, Hillsdale Co., Mich., and passed two years in the labor of a machinist.

In 1867 he went to the city of Rochester, N. Y., and worked in the foundry and machine shop of Woodbury & Booth several years.

In the spring of 1872, associated with his father, he came to Greenville, Montcalm Co., Mich., and under the firm name of I. & T. H. Peacock, they engaged in the successful manufacture of agricultural implements until December of the same year, when their works were destroyed by fire.

The loss entailed was $6,000, which was total, owing to their being wholly without insurance.

They rebuilt and were soon again in working order on borrowed capital, but the financial stringency of 1873 inflicted another disaster, and both father and son abandoned their project and operated as journeymen until 1876.

Within that year Mr. T. H. Peacock resolved to make another venture in the way of operating independently, and after prospecting a short time fixed p upon Reed City as presenting a possible fair field for effort, and father and son again embarked in the tide of manufacture.

They again borrowed the necessary capital and established a foundry.

Disaster again threatened them from circumstances and the times, as the locality had then no demand for their wares, and with exactly the correct judgment their establishment was converted into the line of productions in which it has since been utilized.

In 1878 Mr. Peacock of this sketch purchased his father's interest and has since managed the business alone.

The senior Peacock is engaged as a machinist and general blacksmith at Reed City.

Mr. Peacock was made a Mason at Reed City, and belongs to Blue Lodge No. 351, and to Royal Arch Chapter No. 63.

He is a member of the Stedman Post, No. 98, G. A. R., and instituted the Lodge of Odd Fellows at Reed City.

His residence is located adjoining his place of business, where he owns 11 lots, in.

Block No. 1, near the Junction of the Grand Rapids & Indiana and Flint & Pere Marquette Railroads.

He was first married 1864, at Manchester, N. Y., to Mary A. Metcalf, and they became the parents of two children: Herbert was born April 26, 1869; and Gladis May died in infancy.

Their mother died March 18, 1878, in Reed City, this county.

Mr. Peacock was a second time married Oct. 2, 1879, in Hastings, Barry Co., Mich., to Eugenia J. Cole.

They have two children, - Thomas I., born Sept. 18, 1881, and Florence May, born Oct. 30, 1884.

Mrs. Peacock was born in Seneca Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of John and Jane Cole.

 

William Purchase, hotel proprietor and farmer at Ashton, is a son of Samuel and Huldah (Parsall) Purchase, natives of New York.

In their family were eight children, six sons and two daughters, the third son being the subject named at the head of this sketch.

He was born in Ontario Co., N. Y., July 28, 1821, and received a moderate common-school education.

His advantages for education were somewhat limited by the fact that the family lived in a new country, and as soon as the boys were old enough they were put to manual labor upon the farm, to aid in support of the household.

Young William was industrious, and was in the habit, even after a hard day's work, of taking his book by fire-light and poring over the problems that seemed to promise utility in the battles of life.

He lived at home until 24 years of age, when he struck out among strangers for himself, namely, in Hillsdale Co., Mich.

There he purchased a piece of wild land, and after residing upon it about five years, he removed to Ottawa County, this State, and followed farming there for nearly 30 years, that is, until 1880, when he came to this county and became proprietor of the hotel at Ashton, which he is now conducting.

He also purchased 70 acres of land, 20 of which are under cultivation.

Mr. Purchase is a Republican in his views of national issues, and both he and wife are members of the Wesleyan Methodist Church.

He was married in Hillsdale County, this State, April 13, 1849, to Emeline Hungerford, and they had two children, named Lucretia and Louisa; the latter died in infancy.

Shortly before her death, however, Mrs. P. died, of consumption, and Mr. Purchase was again married, July 7, 1852, in the same county, to Mary East,vay, who is a native of England, and was brought to this country when an infant.

The children by this marriage are Leroy T., Emeline and Lorenzo.

 

Enos H. Marvin, farmer, section 16, Richmond Township, is a son of Stiles and Almeda (Merlatt) Marvin.

His father was a native of the State of New York, and his mother of Michigan.

In their family were seven children, namely, Enos H., the subject of the sketch, Ida, Guy, Minnie, Nora, Myrtie and Ray.

Mr. Marvin, whose name heads the above paragraph, was born in Wright, Ottawa Co., Mich., Jan. 1, 1853.

He lived at home until 21 years of age, attending school and working on his father's farm.

After he became of age he labored upon the same farm, on shares with his father, for one year.

He continued to reside in his native county until the spring of 1881, when he came to Osceola County and purchased 160 acres of partly improved land, where he now resides.

He keeps 12 cows, and is engaged in supplying the people of Reed City with milk; he has a good patronage and is enjoying satisfactory success.

The marriage of Mr. Marvin to Miss Ida Powell, a native of the State of Illinois, took place Jan. 1, 1874 in Berlin, Ottawa Co., Mich.

Mr. and Mrs. M. have four children; their names are Lula, Roy, Visa and Orisa.

 

Conrad W. Fulmenshauser is an agriculturist on section 20, Richmond Township.

He was born Dec. 25, 1834, in Germany, of which country his parents, Conrad and Margaret Fulmenshauser, were also natives.

The latter passed all their lives in their native When 18 years old, Conrad W. emigrated to this country and first located in Canada.

He lived there until 1863 and then moved to this county, taking possession of 80 acres of land under the regulations of the homestead laws.

Here he is now a resident. To his original entry he has added by purchase 120 acres more, and he has about 110 acres in productive cultivation.

In national affairs M. F. is identified in his principles with the Republican Party.

He was married in Canada in 1854, to Catherine Schultz, who was born in Germany in 1832. They have had six children, namely: Maggie, Conrad, John, Henry, Catherine and William.

Mr. F. has been Overseer of Highways in his township, and is esteemed as a worthy citizen.

 

Anthony Poulliott, blacksmith, resident on section 18, Hersey Township, was born in 1846, in St. Bernard, Canada.

He is the son of Peter and Catherine (Octo) Poulliott, of French lineage, and residents of Chanla, Ont., where they belong to the agricultural class.

Mr. Poulhott learned his trade in the Dominion, and is accounted a master of his business, which he is prosecuting with success.

In 1857 he went to Montreal, whence he removed to Montcalm Co., Mich.

In September, 1873, he came to Hersey Township.

He passed the entire season in lumbering.

Besides his homestead he owns 40 acres of land on section 16 and 120 on section 5.

His premises where he resides are in first-class order, with excellent buildings.

He was married Dec. 14, 1868, to Nancy Maher, and the following is the record of their children: Eward was born Aug. 16, 1871, in Grand Rapids, and died on his birthday in 1873, Big Rapids; Frank was born Sept. 16, 1873; Margaret, Oct. 26, 1875; Mary, Nov. 2, 1878; and Anna, Sept. 26, 1882.

Mrs. Poulliot is the daughter of James and Mary (Whalen) Maher.

Her father died Nov. 13, 1871, in Bloomer, Montcalm Co., Mich., when about 67 years of age.

They had 12 children, six of whom are living, - James, Mary E., Elizabeth, John, Edward and Mrs. P., who is the oldest of the family and was born Aug. 29, 1851, in Chili, Monroe Co., Mich.

 

Solomon Hoffine, farmer on section 4 of Richmond Township, is a native of the "land of Penn and of the honest Quakers," being born in York Co., Pa., Aug. 14, 1830.

His parents, Henry and Elizabeth (Grone) Hoffine, were also natives of the same State.

On arriving at the age of legal responsibility, Solomon left home and struck out into the world for himself.

First he spent three years as a farm laborer, and then for 12 years he managed a rented farm; next, he bought a farm of 40 acres in Wayne Co., Ohio, which he afterward sold, and bought 50 acres in Summit County, same State.

On the latter he 1ived and labored for 10 years, and then sold it and I came to this county, in the fall of 1879, and purchased a tract of 120 acres in Richmond Township, where he has made it his home.

Since first purchasing, however, he has disposed of 80 acres.

In his views of national questions Mr. Hoffine sympathizes with the Republican Party.

He has served his fellow citizens in the capacity of Overseer of Highways.

He was married in Wayne Co., Ohio on July 5, 1856, to Mary J. Bartell, who was a native of that State, and was born Jan. 28, 1834.

Mr. and Mrs. Hoffine have had three children, namely: George E., Medora, who died when three months old, and Clara A.

 

Franklin S. Robbins, farmer, section 34, Richmond Township, is the son of James f G. and Olive E. (Slade) Robbins.

He was born May 5, 1843, in Potter Co., Pa., and is the oldest of seven children born to his parents.

They removed to Osceola County when he was 12 years old, locating there in February, 1855.

He obtained little education save the practical variety that comes from early acquaintance with labor and effort, and he passed his youth in farming and lumbering.

In 1862 he became a soldier in the service of the United States, enlisting in the Third Michigan Infantry.

He served two years, and was a participant in all the important engagements of the Peninsular campaign and in smaller affairs without number.

On obtaining his discharge he became sutler's clerk for William H. Gomersall, and was in his employ until the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox Court-House and the collapse of the Rebellion.

He accompanied his employer in a similar capacity to Fort Ringgold, Texas, and after a year of service there formed a partnership with him in mercantile business.

A year later he disposed of his interest by sale and returned to Osceola County, with the intention of giving his attention exclusively to agriculture.

To this end he purchased 80 acres of land in the township of Richmond, where he established his homestead.

In 1869 he opened his house for the accommodation of the traveling public, such an establishment being a necessity of the times.

The place was known as the "Osceola House."

In the same year he began lumbering and has continued that business ever since.

He conducted the hotel seven years, and in 1876 rented it.

He has handled a considerable amount of real estate in various parts of the county, and is present owner of 320 acres within its limits, and of 80 acres in Mecosta County.

His homestead farm contains 240 acres, including 200 acres in an advanced state of cultivation.

His elegant residence was built in 1879.

His home surroundings are considered the finest in Osceola County.

His stock includes 31 head of cattle, 18 horses and 50 hogs, and his farm is supplied with all the best modern agricultural implements.

He is also the owner of valuable real estate in the city of Grand Rapids.

His farm products for 1884 included 714 bushels of wheat, 1,277 bushels of oats, and 2,500 bushels of corn.

His cut of hay amounted approximately to 80 tons.

He was married in Rio Grande, Texas, June 14, 1866, to Emma B. Haymond.

Their children are Howard G., born April 3, 1868; Hattie L., born Feb. 11, 1870; Minnie M., born May 19, 1871.

Mrs. Robbins was born May 28, 1848, in Fairmont, West Virginia, and is the daughter of Jonathan and Harriet (Wilson) Haymond.

Her parents were born and married in West Virginia, where her father operated some years as a merchant.

In 1857 he went to Central America, where he made his home ever after, save at brief intervals when he returned to the United States.

He returned there for the last time in September, 1881, since which time no trustworthy intelligence of him has reached his family.

His wife died in Richmond, Va., in December, 1865.

Six of their ten children attained adult age,—Mary, Benjamin, Louisa L., William P., Emma B. and George ,H. Louisa L. was born in Virginia, in 1843.

She went with her father to Central America in 1866, whence she returned to Texas in 1871.

In 1873 she became the wife of Capt. B. B. Scott, and removed to Brownsville, Texas, her husband being appointed Attorney of the 15th Judicial District of Texas.

She died at her home in Belton, Texas, Jan. 7, 1878, leaving two children.

She was a woman of very lovely character and her loss was deeply deplored by her family and friends.

Mr. Robbins is a leading citizen of his county and township.

Although popular and possessing to an unusual degree the confidence of the community of which he is a member, he has persistently refused to hold office.

He has so managed his business interests as to develop the section where he resides, and is widely honored and respected.

His influence is felt and exercised in all laudable enterprises of general importance, and he secured the post office station at Crapo in 1869, naming it after the Governor.

He was the first incumbent of the position of Postmaster, which he held many years.

In 1884 he spent some time in travel on the Pacific coast, visiting Colorado, California, Oregon and Washington Territory.

 

John H. Freeland, farmer, section 28, Lincoln Township, is a son of Jonathan C. and Sophronia (Crawford) Freeland.

His father was a native of New Brunswick and his mother was a native of Canada.

They married and settled in Michhe died at Bunker Hill, Ingham County, this State, Jan. 20, 1880: his widow is still living.

They had six children, viz.: Saloma, Erwin J., Henry C., John H., Hartman A. and Drusilla.

The subject of this biographical outline was born in Lenawee Co., Mich., July 16, 1843, and remained at home until 23 years of age, when he purchased a tract of land in Ingham County, this State, on which he lived a year.

He then concluded that he could better his fortunes by a removal to the frontier, and accordingly came to Newaygo County and took possession of 80 acres of land under the provisions of the homestead law, in Barton Township; but after a residence there of two years he moved to Big Rapids and followed the mason's trade for about two years; he next came to Reed City and worked at his trade four years; and finally he came to Lincoln Township, this county, in the spring of 1875, and, in company with W. C. Harrington, purchased 80 acres of land, where he settled and has since resided.

He also owns, in company with Mr. H., 40 acres on section 29, and in his own right one-half of 70 acres more, all of which is under good cultivation.

Mr. Freeland has risked his life on the campgrounds, skirmish lines, battle-fields, etc., of the army in defense of his country, enlisting Sept. 4, 1864, in the 12th Mich. Vol. Inf., serving one year and returning home without having received serious injury.

He has held the office of Highway Commissioner four terms. In his views of governmental policy he is a Republican.

Mr. Freeland was married at Leslie, Ingham Co., Mich., Oct. 13, 1866, to Miss Rozilla, daughter of George and Ada (Whitmore) Hull, her father a native of Vermont and her mother of Massachusetts.

She was born in Pike Co., Ind., July 3, 1850. Mr. and Mrs. F. have been the parents of one child, Clarence L., who was born Aug. 6, 1868, and died Sept. 15, 1882.

 

Christian Frohlich is a farmer on section 18, Richmond Township.

He is a native of Germany, as was also his father, Jacob Frohlich.

He was born in 1824, and in 1855 came to Canada; after living in that Dominion seven years, he came to Osceola County and took possession, under the provisions and regulations of the Homestead Laws, of 80 acres where he now resides.

He has added to his homestead 80 acres more by further purchase, and he now has about 60 acres improved and in a good productive condition.

In religion he and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church.

He was married the first time in Germany, to Mary Bram, in 1855, and they were the parents of four children: Anna, Henry, John and Albert.

Their mother died in Canada. Mr. Frohlich was again married, in Osceola County, in 1866, to Dorothy Hopp, who is a native of Germany.

Mr. and Mrs. Frohlich have been the parents of four children: Jacob, Mary, Reka, and Freddy.

 

William Berger, farmer, section 35, Richmond Township, was born Dec. 12, 1829, in Germany.

When about five years old his parents, John and Catherine (Lux) Berger, left their native country with their family and emigrated to the State of New York, where they settled in Wayne County.

Mr. Berger remained there until the spring of 1855, the date of his removal to Osceola County.

He settled in the township of Richmond, and is one of the earliest permanent settlers.

He bought 240 acres of land, established his residence there and has been its occupant continuously ever since.

He has brought to bear the best quality of thrift and energy, and has about 180 acres under excellent improvements.

He affiliates with the Republican element in politics, has held the offices of Justice of the Peace and Highway Commissioner, and has officiated two years as Township Treasurer.

He was married Nov. 12, 1859, in Mecosta County, to Abigail Montague, and their seven children were born as follows: Harvey W., Charles E., Ida M. (married Abraham Seeley, April 11, 1883, and resides in Crapo), George W., Hattie M., John J. and Laura A. Mrs. Berger was born March 30, 184o, in Kent County, and is the daughter of James and Laura L. (Hungerford) Montague.

Her parents were natives of New England.

 

Andrew J. Johnson, deceased, formerly farmer and blacksmith, resident on section 26, Hersey Township, was born "May 28, 1840, in Trumbull Co., Ohio.

He is the son of Ichabod and Mary A. (Whitmore) Johnson.

The latter survives, and resides in Farwell, Clare Co., Mich., with her son.

His father died on his farm in Hersey Township, in 1876.

He was a mechanic and blacksmith by vocation, and taught his son the latter trade.

He was a resident of California some years, and meanwhile Mr. Johnson of this sketch was under the care of an uncle.

He spent some years in hunting and trapping in Northern Michigan, and in 1861 he enlisted in the Third Michigan Infantry.

He was wounded twice in his left leg, and also received an injury to his scalp and was mustered out in 1864 for disability, having  participated in about a dozen heavy engagements.

After the war he took possession of his present farm, consisting of 80 acres, and has improved 15 acres.

He was married Jan. 6, 1866, to Mary A. Jones, and they have been the parents of seven children, born as follows: Alice May, Jan. 12, 1867 (died Sept. 1, 1868); Charles A., Oct. 12, 1868; Mary E., March 4, 1871; George W., Dec. 13, 1873; Wm. P., June 8, 1877; Courtland W., Oct. 24, 1880.

Mrs. Johnson is the daughter of Ebenezer and Rosamond (Buttrick) Jones, and was born June 7, 1846, in Allegany, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y. She has two brothers and one sister living,—Ebenezer H., Tyler and Alice A.

Andrew J. Johnson died Feb. 23, 1880.

He was the oldest of 13 children born to his parents, several of whom died in infancy.

Those who attained maturity were Ann, Richard M., Sidney, Ichabod B. and Ellen Martha. William, Martha (1st), Mary, Ella and Joseph are deceased.

The mother of Mrs. Johnson lived with her about 10 years and died March 5, 1884.

Her father died when she was a child, in Allegany, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y.

 

Henry Walker, farmer, section 8, Richmond Township, is a son of Samuel and Sarah (Schoonover) Walker, who were natives of the honest old State of Pennsylvania.

In their family were seven children, - five sons and two daughters, - the subject of this sketch being the third son.

He was born in Tioga County, in the State of New York, Aug. 25, 1824.

He remained at the parental home until 24 years of age; then, being naturally skillful with tools and mechanical work, he commenced in the world as a carpenter and builder, and followed that trade exclusively for ten years.

He then bought a saw-mill in Pennsylvania, which he operated for two years, when he sold out and moved to Illinois, and entered into partnership with his uncle in a steam saw-mill in Kendall County, that State.

After continuing in that relation for two and a half years, he returned to the Keystone State and for a time engaged in carpenter work.

Next, he went back to the old farm in Tioga Co., N. Y., resided there four years, and then went to Elmira, N. Y., resuming his trade there for one year.

Next, he returned to farming, in the same State and in Bradford Co., Pa.

Finally, in the spring of 1875, he came to this county, and purchased 100 acres of partly improved land (having about 20 acres cleared) on the section, where he has, since made his residence.

He now has about 65 acres improved and in a good condition of cultivation with fine farm buildings, etc., and in 1883-4 he built a commodious residence, which he now occupies.

Mr. Walker has held the several school offices in his community, and in his views of the common weal he sympathizes with the Prohibition element.

He was first married in Bradford Co., Pa., Nov. 24, 1852, to Sarah J. Carner, who was born in the same county, in 1837.

By this marriage there were two children, named Mary E., who was born Jan. 1, 1853, and Horace P., Oct. 7, 1855.

Mrs. Walker died June 18, 1858, in Illinois, and Mr. W. was again married, in Waverly, Tioga Co., N. Y., Jan. 9, 1863, to Julia Walker, who was born July 17, 1841.

By this union three children were born, viz.: Fred,' April 14, 1865; Lewis, June 15, 1867; and Alvah J., Sept. 6, 1858.

Mrs. Julia Walker died Feb. 23, 1874, and Mr. W., in Delaware Co., N. Y., chose for his third wife Hannah C. Hinckley, who was born in, that county, May 13, 1838.

Her parents, Birch and Mary (Traverse) Hinckley, were also natives of the Empire State.

 

Joseph Earnest, farmer, section 21, Richmond Township, was born Jan. 5, 1842, in Germany.

His parents, John and Caroling Earnest, emigrated thence to Canada in 1849; settling in Oxford Co., Ont., where they were residents during the remaining years of their lives.

They had 16 children, eight of whom died in infancy.

Five sons and three daughters reached mature years.

Mr. Earnest was seven years of age when he bid final farewell to the land of his birth.

He lived in Ontario until his removal to Michigan in the winter of 1861, the date of his locating in Mecosta County.

He remained in the township of Wheatland one year, proceeding in 1862 to Osceola County.

He became a farmer and lumberman and operated various points some years.

In the autumn of 1871, he bought 80 acres of wild land in Richmond Township, of which he is still proprietor, and of 80 acres additional acquired by later purchase.

His property is situated on sections 21 and 28, and he has cleared, improved and put under cultivation, 115 acres.

His farm is skillfully managed, and the buildings, of recent erection, do credit to the township, and compare favorably with farm structures throughout the county.

Mr. Earnest is a Republican and has acted in the capacity of Overseer of Highways.

He was married Feb. 3, 1863, in Richmond Township, to Mrs. Elizabeth (Waylerter) Nakle, and they have had two children,—Joseph and Daniel.

The latter died July 15, 1883, when 11 years of age.

Mrs. Earnest was born Dec. 17, 1838, in Germany.

Her first husband, Philip Nakle, died in 1862.

They became the parents of five children.

Two died when in infancy.

Adam died June 5, 1883, aged 2 years.

Philip and John survive.

Mrs. Earnest is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

George W. Troyer, farmer, section 4, Hersey Township, was born May 13, 1856, near Toronto, Canada.

His parents, Christopher and Margaret (Clark) Troyer, came from the Dominion to Ionia Co., Mich., in 1862, his father buying a farm in Lyons.

In the fall of 1878 they came to Hersey Township, where the father and son bought 40 acres and 120 acres respectively, on which they have since lived and labored.

The senior Troyer was born March 31, 1827, and is living with his son.

The mother was born in 1834, and died in Canada in 1863.

Mr. Troyer began life independently when 14 years old, working as a farm assistant by the month, which sort of labor he continued until 1878, when he learned the business of a carpenter; and in this he has been more or less occupied ever since.

Since his removal here he has also engaged in farming and lumbering.

He was married March 22, 1881, to Nettie E., daughter of James and Mary R. (Scranton) Coakley.

They have two children, - Frank J., born Sept. 1882, and Harvey C., born Sept 13, 1884.

Mrs. Troyer was born Aug. 15, 1859, in Grattan Center, Kent Co., Mich.

Her father was born July 24, 1834 at Verban, Kings Co., Ireland, and was married Jan. 19, 1859.

His wife was born Dec. 21, 1834, in Washington, Macomb County, Michigan.

She died in Grattan, Aug. 24, 1863.

Mr. Troyer is a Republican in political principles, and is actively interested in the educational matters of his township.

 

Alexander McFarlane, farmer, section 26, Richmond Township, was born Aug. 4, 1832, and is the son of Andrew and Margaret (Gray) McFarlane.

His parents were born in Scotland and emigrated to Canada about the year 1830, where the family resided until the death of the father.

After that event the mother removed with the five surviving children to Mecosta County, where she is still a resident.

Five of their children died in infancy.

Mr. McFarlane was a resident of the Dominion until 1855, the year of his removal to Michigan.

He passed some months as a laborer in Newaygo and Mecosta Counties, and in the spring of 1858 he bought 160 acres of land on section 26, of Richmond Township.

At that date the settlers were like angels visits, - few and far between, - and the entire- county in the most primitive condition, as but three years had elapsed since the first permanent settler I had established his residence here.

He has placed about one-half of his acreage under tillage.

Mr. McFarlane was appointed one of the Inspectors of the first election held in Osceola County, has been Justice of the Peace, Treasurer, Overseer of Highways and Commissioner of the same, and has officiated as one of the County Superintendents of the Poor.

He was married January, 1860, in Crapo, Richmond Township, to Charlotte R. Robbins.

Their children were born as follows: Andrew, April 28, 1862; Franklin P., April 8, 1864; Jennie A., April 1, 1866; Neil G., May 11, 1867; Ethel M., May 2, 1869; Bertha E., Sept. 18, 1872; Lena B., June 18, 1878. Jennie died May 27, 1866; Neil died Sept. 10, 1881.

Mrs. McFarlane is the daughter of James G. and Olive E. (Slade) Robbins.

She was born Jan. 27, 1845, in Potter Co., Pa., and was 11 years of age when her parents settled in Osceola County, where they were among the earliest settlers.

Mr. and Mrs. McFarlane are members of the Congregational Church.

He is an ardent Republican, a man of clear understanding, safe judgment and possesses an abundant store of information gleaned from extensive reading.

 

John F. Radcliffe, owner, manager and editor of the Osceola County Outline, agent of the American Express Co., Coroner and Justice of the Peace, located at Hersey, was born Feb. 26, 1829, in the township of Perry, Lake Co., Ohio.

His parents, William and Margaret (Kelley) Radcliffe, were both natives of the Isle of Man, in the Irish Sea.

After their marriage they emigrated to the United States and settled in Lake Co., Ohio.

Later the family removed to Mentor, Ohio, where the senior Radcliffe pursued his vocation of tailor until his death in 1856, at the age of 61 years.

The mother was born Sept. 6, 1804, and still resides at Mentor.

She is in the possession of the activity and firm health of her years of prime.

Mr. Radcliffe decided early in youth on the pursuit of a machinist as a calling, and at 17 entered upon a course of preparation in a machine shop, and persevered in operating in that line to the fulfillment of his purpose three years, when failing health compelled him to permanently abandon the project, and he obtained a position on the literary staff of the Painesville Telegraph, to whose columns he had been a miscellaneous contributor since the age of 15 years.

In 1853 he commenced a series of contributions to the local department of the Detroit Tribune, and wrote stories for its literary columns, continuing his connection with that journal about 18 months. In 1855 he was made local editor of the Toledo

Blade, the first incumbent of the department after the establishment of the piper, operating in that avenue about two years, and working successively on the Commercial and Herald, contemporaneous journals published at Toledo.

Meanwhile he officiated two years as clerk in the post office of that city.

In 1858 he went to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and superintended the publication of the Cedar Valley Times, remaining in the position until the advent of civil war.

In 1861 he received notification of his military obligations as a member of the 14th Regiment Ohio Militia, to which he belonged, and was summoned by the superior officer of the organization, Colonel (afterwards General) Stedman, to report for duty and rejoin "Company A."

He arrived in Ohio too late, the regiment having obtained its quota and gone to the front.

At the urgent request of Colonel Stedman he went to Waterloo, De Kalb Co., Ind., and took charge of the Waterloo Press, a local Union journal, which he managed four months, and at the end of that time he leased the office, fixtures and relations of the paper for a year, after which he assumed the management of the Kendallville (Ind.) Standard, his family remaining at their home in Waterloo.

In 1863 he bought the Press, and continued its publication until the destruction of his office in 1867 by fire, a disaster which involved the proprietor in considerable loss.

He resumed operations after a short delay, continuing but a brief period when he established the Air Line in the same place.

In the fall of 1870 he came to Hersey, having fallen into precarious health, to take control of the paper now known as "the Osceola Outline”, coming here for the purpose at the solicitation of D. A. Blodgett and Dr. Norman Teal, the latter at that time acting as editor.

Mr. Winchell, later the founder of the Plainwell (Allegan Co.) Independent, and subsequently elected to the Legislature of Michigan, came simultaneously to aid in establishing the Outline on a permanent basis.

The first copy was issued Jan. 5, 1871.

In May, 1872, Mr. Radcliffe succeeded to the sole control by purchase, and in 1881 changed the name of the paper to its present style.

At the date of his removal to Hersey the site of the place was chiefly in its natural condition, and the present location of his residence and office was covered with primeval forest.

In 1873 he purchased "block 68," cleared a small "patch" and erected a building for his business.

His residence is on the same tract.

He is the owner of 80 acres of land on section 13, Richmond Township, and holds 240 acres additional in different parts of the county.

In 1877 he was appointed express agent.

Soon after coming to Hersey he was elected Justice of the Peace, and has continued the incumbent of the position.

In the fall of 1880 he was elected County Coroner, and has been successively reelected.

In the fall of 1884 he was elected Treasurer of Osceola County, by a majority of 633.

The marriage of Mr. Radcliffe to Mary French occurred in 1855, at Painesville, Ohio.

She was born in Perry, Lake Co., Ohio, and is the daughter of Nathaniel and Abigail French, a family of Vermont origin.

They have two children,—Harriet, the wife or George W. Moore, lumberman in Missaukee Co., Mich.

She is a graduate from the female Seminary at Painesville, Ohio.

Lucy E. is at home with her parents.

Mrs. Radcliffe is an able assistant in the mechanical department of the Outline.

 

John Mitchell, an old settler of Richmond Township, was born in Germany, March 12, 1835, and when he was 15 years of age emigrated thence with his parents, Frederick and Frederica Mitchell, to Hamilton, Ontario, and later to London.

His father was a farmer in "das Faderland," and followed the same vocation after reaching the New World.

Mr. Mitchell's first important move in the world was his settlement in a matrimonial enterprise.

He was married Sept. 15, 1859, near Stratford, Ont., to Elnoia Ruppert.

She was born Nov. 16, 1837, in Prussia.

Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell have nine children, namely: Adam, Maggie, Annie, Mary, Grace, Catherine, John, Lewis and William.

Adam is married, and is a farmer in Richmond Township; Maggie married Jerry Golkey, a hotel-keeper at Chippewa Lake; Anne is the wife of John Roth, at Reed City.

Mr. Mitchell came to Michigan in June, 1862, and located a claim of 80 acres on section 22, Richmond Township, of which he is still the proprietor, and also 80 acres respectively on sections 27 and 28, and 120 on section 29 of the same township.

He has about 200 acres under cultivation and in fine farming condition.

In 1882 he opened a bar and billiard-room at Reed City, where he traffics in the articles common to similar establishments.

He built the building where he operates in 1882, and retains his residence on his farm two miles south of Reed City.

 

William L. Stiege, farmer, section 10, Richmond Township, was born in Buffalo, N. Y., June 29, 1835; his father, Carl Stiege, was a native of Germany.

In the fall of 1865 the subject of this sketch came to Osceola County and took possession of 80 acres of land on section 10, under the regulations of the Homestead Laws, and has since resided there.

He has 45 acres under good cultivation, and a comfortably equipped home.

He also is in possession of some village property.

Mr. Stiege was married in Newaygo Co., Mich., Oct. 3, 1867, to Miss Mary Roberts, and they are the parents of six children, namely: Sanford, Lewis, Louisa, Josephina, Albert and Benjamin.

 

Hiram Wetherell, farmer, section 17, Hersey Township, was born April 20, 1816, in Con. quest, Cayuga Co., N. Y.

He is the son of Noah and Betsey (Mott) Wetherell, both of whom are deceased.

The father was born in Massachusetts, was a soldier of the war of 1812, and fought at the battle of Lundy's Lane.

The parents died about the year 1840, in Cayuga Co., N. Y., and were separated in their deaths only six days.

The mother was born in the near vicinity of the Catskill Mountains in New York.

In 1840 Mr. Wetherell removed from his native State to Livingston Co., Mich.

He purchased 80 acres of land in the township of Conway, removing thence to Grand Blanc, Genesee County, in 1861.

He was in the hotel business there 18 months, in which he was fairly successful.

He exchanged the property for 80 acres of land in the township of Montrose in the same county, coming thence to Hersey, in 1880.

He bought nearly 67 acres of land on which he established his homestead.

He is a Republican in principle and has held the Supervisorship f every township in which he has lived, except Hersey.

He was one of the delegates to the Convetion in Livingston County when the party was organized.

He was Treasurer of Montrose seven years, was Justice of the Peace and State Road Commissioner.

He opened the road from Chesaning to Clio in 1875.

He was married June 19, 1834, in Conquest, Cayuga Co., N. Y., to Mahala Ferdig.

Their children [were born as follows: Cynthia, Sept. 4, 1835 (died March 24, 1857); Hannah J. was born Dec. 15, 1837; Mary E., April 24, 1840; Eri H, Oct. 18, 1842; Hiram, Jr., Nov. 6, 1846 (died Nov. 8, 1852); Helen, December 15, 1852.

The mother was born Dec. 4, 1815, in Conquest, and is the daughter of John and Hannah (Waters) Ferdig.

Her parents died in Middleville, Barry Co., Mich., aged respectively 60 and 55 years.

The golden-wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Wetherell was celebrated by their children in June of the current year.

Two of their daughters reside in Osceola County.

 

Henry K. Smith, harness and trunk maker at Reed City, was born July 27, 1848, in Truro, Colchester Co., Nova Scotia.

His parents, William C. and Renew (Nelson) Smith, were natives of the same province, where his father died, in May, 1872.

The mother is still living there, aged 76 years.

Mr. Smith is the ninth of ten children born to his parents, and passed the first 17 years of his life on a farm.

He served from that age until he was 21 years old, at Truro, in acquiring his trade.

He opened his business at Woburn Center, Mass., and after a trial of six months' duration he returned to his home and soon after opened a shop at Maitland, 12 miles from the place of his birth.

Two years later he went to Lowell, Mass., and operated there and at Bath and in other towns.

He came to Reed City in 1876, and established himself in the business of harness-making.

Meanwhile he erected the building in which he is now managing his business, which is two stories in height above the basement, is 23x55 feet in height, and constructed of brick.

His business relations require the aid of four assistants.

Mr. Smith was married Sept. 26, 1877, to Julia E. Stoddard, and their three children were born as follows: William R., July 31, 1878; Mary R., deceased, and Mabel, born Aug. 26, 1883.

Mrs. Smith was born in Detroit in June, 1847, and is the daughter of Rodman and Mary Stoddard.

 

James H. Hope, farmer, section 20, Hersey  Township, was born Feb. 17, 1842, in Kalamazoo, Mich.

His parents, Edward and Amelia A. (Stevens) Hope, are both natives of the State of New York.

His father is of mixed English and Scotch parentage; his mother descended from Irish and Dutch ancestry.

They were early settlers in Kalamazoo County, where the father erected the first frame barn built in the township of Texas.

They live on a farm two miles from the village of Edmore, Montcalm Co., Mich.

Mr. Hope was reared on a farm, and Aug. 7, 1862, he enlisted in Co. H, 25th Mich. Vol. Inf.

His regiment was assigned to the First Brigade, Second Division and 23d Army Corps, General Schofield commanding, and was mustered out of the military service of the United States June 24, 1865, at Salisbury, N. C.

Mr. Hope fought at Franklin and Nashville, Tenn., and his regiment was in breastworks at the time of the surrender of General Johnston.

They came to Jackson, Mich., where they were paid off, and after reaching home Mr. Hope spent a year in recovering his former state of health.

He became interested in farming, and operated two years as manager of his father's farm.

He next went to Nebraska and worked one season by the month, returning thence to Kalamazoo County, remaining there one year.

In 1871 he came to Hersey Township and secured a claim of 80 acres of land by purchase from the individual who had become its proprietor under the Homestead Law.

Mr. Hope found himself obliged to go back to first principles to protect his title and re-entered the claim.

About 15 acres were partially improved, and the clearing had a small log house.

The latter is now their home, and the entire place manifests the care and energy of the owner.

Mr. Hope was married Jan. 29, 1870, to Sarah J. Ross, and they have one child—Cora B.—born June 3, 1872.

Mrs. Hope was born June 7, 1850, in Norwich, Ont.

Her mother, Mary (Mustard) Ross, died in Norwich when her daughter was about nine years old.

Her father, Hopkins Ross, is living in the village of Hersey.

The brothers and sisters of Mrs. Hope are named Wm. H., Nelson A., Mary J. (twin sister of Mrs. H.), Sylvester, Daniel (deceased), and Martha A.

Three brothers and a sister of Mr. Hope are all living.

They are Charles E., Mary A., Isaac H. and Chauncey C.

Benjamin F. Gooch

Benjamin F. Gooch, farmer, section 25, Richmond Township, is one of the earliest settlers in Osceola County and is as closely associated with the history of the "first things " of the county as any other member of its pioneer element.

He has been a resident of Michigan since early childhood, his father, Benjamin Gooch, having removed from his native State to the Territory of Michigan in 1834.

He was a merchant and lumberman in Maine, where he was born, and married Lucy Boyington.

In the year named they set out with their family of nine children to found a home in Michigan.

They traveled westward on the Erie Canal, and while in the immediate vicinity of Rochester, in the middle of the night, the wife and mother rose from her berth, made her way to the deck, and as the watchman observed her she suddenly walked overboard and sunk from sight!

The watchman roused the occupants of the boat, and in half an hour her lifeless body was rescued from the cold waters.

Every effort at resuscitation was made, but in vain, and she was buried in the beautiful cemetery of Mount Hope in the southern suburb of the city of Rochester, and the bereaved family pursued their sad journey to their destination.

The senior Gooch had disposed of all his business interests on leaving the Pine-Tree State, and the money realized—all in gold was in a belt clasped around the body of the wife, and was the means of her death, as its weight prevented her rising to the surface.

The family located in Wayne Co., Mich., where, later, the father married Phebe Sherman, and they became the parents of four children.

In 1848 they removed to Kent Co., Mich., where the father died of small-pox.

His wife died in 1847, in Plymouth, Wayne County.

Mr. Gooch of this sketch was born March 20, 1831, in Machias, Washington Co., Maine.

He was but three years old when he was deprived of his mother's care.

Until he was 16 years of age he passed his life in the manner common to farmers sons in a pioneer period.

He was a level-headed boy, having a well-balanced temperament, formed of the excellent traits of a mixed Scotch and English ancestry, the former predominating and descending to him in the maternal line.

The element of actives; effort is his leading characteristic and has marked all his life.

He is an embodiment of the principle of doing a duty himself instead of delegating what needs to be done to the chance of a transferred duty.

His education consisted chiefly of a comprehensive knowledge of Daboll's Arithmetic, obtained by resolute braving of the wintry winds daily a distance of nearly two miles, where he was a pupil in a log school-house with horizontal windows, stone fire-place, "stick" chimney and slab seats.

But in this instance, as in thousands of others, the achievements of Mr. Gooch attest the value of rugged training and lack of the effeminating appurtenances of the life of to-day, which fosters weakness and extracts the vigor and fire from the human composition.

The capital was removed from Detroit to Lansing at a time when that portion of Ingham County was, a wilderness, and in three localities the eager citizens began to build with all haste.

A Mr. Randolph, who owned a foundry, engaged the senior Gooch to draw a load of stoves to Lansing, and Benjamin was sent with the team.

Mr. Randolph gave him in addition a quantity of cast-iron boot-jacks to peddle in the city on commission, which he did, and sold them when there was not a painted building in the place.

All finishing material had to be drawn from Detroit Y with teams, and the people waited for the advent of winter and snow in order to facilitate transportation of heavy merchandise.

In 1849 Mr. Gooch went to Virginia, where he worked by the month in a steam saw and grist mill, and also aided in the management of a carding machine.

He operated in that capacity until 1853, when he returned to Michigan and engaged as a farm assistant and as a lumberman in the woods near Grand Rapids.

In the fall of 1855, in company with three other men and driving an ox team, Mr. Gooch proceeded to the northern extremity of the thoroughfare in Mecosta County, to a point four miles north of the present city of Big Rapids, when the site of the plucky and prosperous city was not marked by a single structure.

On the fifth day of September he began cutting a road northward into the wilderness, crossing the boundary of Mecosta County into Osceola County on the 14th day of the same month.

This was the first wagon road in Osceola County.

A few settlers had come in the previous spring, and had utilized the water routes, coming hither by means of canoes on the Muskegon, the general method of travel in Northern Michigan previous to the day of railroads and State thoroughfares.

The line of road constructed by Mr. Gooch extended to Cat Creek, a distance of 16 miles.

The party were joined by Delos A. Blodgett, who made a permanent settlement and became inseparably connected with the development of Osceola County, but who removed to Grand Rapids, where he is now a resident.

Nicholas Rescoe also came with them.

He is still a resident of the county.

In the latter part of November, Mr. Gooch hired a Mr. and Mrs. Dildine and their daughter—eleven years old—at Grand Rapids, and moved them to Cat Creek.

It is believed these were the first white women within the county limits.

In that winter Mr. Gooch shot a large number of deer, and a lynx.

He has still in his possession a robe made from the pelts of six wolves which he killed the same winter.

The exigencies of the time in which he became a resident of Northern Michigan developed his abilities as a hunter, and he has shot deer in the counties of Kent, Newaygo, Mecosta, Osceola, Missaukee and Clare, at a date when the present sites of Big Rapids, Reed City, Hersey and Evart were fair fields for the hunter's harvest, which he gathered with his rifle on more than one occasion.

Mr. Gooch passed the winter in the discharge of his duties as foreman of a logging party and lumber camp, and in the spring of 1856 pre-empted 160 acres of Government land where he has since maintained his residence.

Later, he bought 40 acres additional.

He made a small clearing on his original purchase, built a log shanty and entered with characteristic vigor and energy into the work of clearing his farm.

He is now the proprietor of 200 acres of land, of which no acres are free from stumps and in valuable farming condition.

In the spring of 1857 he set out 100 apple-trees on his farm, which he bought from John Foxbury, of Walker Township, and drew from Grand Rapids with an ox team, a distance of 75 miles, as the road was constructed.

Many of these trees are still in a flourishing condition, some of them having branches 15 feet long.

When these trees were planted the ground was still the resort of deer, wolves and foxes.

The orchard scheme of Mr. Gooch was the source of much comment among the farmers of Grand Rapids and vicinity, as it was firmly believed that apples could not be raised so far north as Osceola County.

He was told by one distinguished gentleman that some of his trees would live and blossom on the south side and perhaps one or two apples might mature on the south side of the core, but the severity of the climate would prevent the sap circulating all around the apple.

The apple crop of the orchard in 1884 (current year) is 400 bushels.

The fact is, the fruit is more perfect and hardy than in regions farther south.

A prominent faculty of Mr. Gooch, and one which has been of inestimable value to him as a pioneer and in other capacities, is his superior abilities as a pedestrian.

In the fall of 1857 he was troubled by a decayed tooth.

The only available instrument in the settlement was an old-fashioned pair of turnkeys, and on their application to the tooth it was crushed, proving only an aggravation of the difficulty.

Mr. Gooch retired with a determination to endure the suffering, but it proved too much for his endurance, and he arose before morning and started afoot for Grand Rapids, walking the entire distance to that city, where he procured the services of L. D. Rogers, who is still living and pursuing his profession in the same place.

Traversing the distance from Richmond Township to Grand Rapids in those early days was a common practice with Mr. Gooch, who has preserved no record of the number of times he has made the trip—"hundreds of times."

The first school-house in Osceola County was built on the northwest quarter of section 25, Richmond Township, and was donated by Mr. Gooch for the purpose to which it was devoted.

The first official dignity borne by Mr. Gooch was that of Highway Commissioner, his jurisdiction including the entire county, which was then attached for municipal purposes to Mecosta County, and known as Green Township.

In the spring of 1861 the township of Richmond was organized, the meeting for that purpose being held at the house of D. A. Blodgett.

Nine votes were cast. Mr. Gooch was elected Town Treasurer, Justice of the Peace and School Inspector.

Mr. Gooch was one of the Judges of Election.

The echoes of the shot at Sumter in their journey round the world aroused the spirit that actuated the pioneers of Osceola County in their toil and privation, and Mr. Gooch, in May, before the wave of patriotism had surged across the continent, made another journey on foot to Grand Rapids to search for a recruiting officer, full of an invincible determination to lend his aid to preserve intact the integrity of his country.

He went thither alone, and was the first enlisted man from his county.

He enrolled in Co. F, Third Mich. Vol. Inf.

The regiment was mustered in 1,040 strong, Col. Daniel McConnell commanding.

Mr. Gooch was under fire in all the important engagements in which his regiment was involved, and in the common experiences of skirmishes and deploys.

He was in the first battle of Bull Run, and afterwards, while stationed at Arlington Heights, to guard against rebel invasion, he had some interesting experiences.

On one occasion, when foraging in the corn and potato fields beyond the line of Union pickets, the party was discovered by the rebels, who sent a shell into the field they had just left.

No one was injured, but they returned to gather the potatoes dug by the missile, which they ate with a grim relish, in consideration of the murderous intent which failed of its purpose and added to their stores.

During his period of military service, Mr. Gooch received four wounds.

At the battle of Fair Oaks he sustained an injury to his right arm from a gunshot, and in the same conflict a piece of shell struck his right shoulder; but he remained in the ranks.

The regiment went into the second fight at Bull Run with about 500 men.

The command was deployed to make a feint attack upon the main line of the rebel army, a movement which depleted the ranks of the "Third" to a fearful extent, roll-call showing that 20 more than half the number who went into action were either killed or wounded.

All the color bearers and color guards were killed or wounded.

Mr. Gooch had borne the regimental standard presented by the ladies of Grand Rapids since the siege of Richmond, and during the second fight at Bull Run he was shot through the right thigh.

After spending two months in the hospital he came to Grand Rapids on recruiting service, for which he was specially detailed.

He rejoined his regiment previous to the battle of Gettysburg, where he was a fourth time wounded, by a minie-ball, in the calf of the right leg.

This injury was so severe as to cause him to be sent to the hospital, and his life was seriously imperiled by the appearance of gangrene in the wound, and from which he remained eight months in the hospital.

He was discharged June 21, 1864, and returned to his farm.

He is a member of Post John J. Bagley, Grand Army of the Republic.

Brother - Amos Gooch volunteered, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin for the Mexican War, was in General Wool’s Brigade and died in his country;s service at Puebla, Mexico, July 30, 1847. In the great War of the Rebellion, Mr. Gooch had four brothers, besides himself!

Charles enlisted in W. Virginia Volunteers at Mannington, Marion, County, and was killed at Winchester, Va., near Harper's Ferry.

Horace enlisted in the Sixth Mich. Cav. at Grand Rapids, and was killed July 14, 1863, in Major Weber's charge at Falling Water, Mo.

John volunteered in the Michigan Regiment of Engineers and Mechanics, served his time and was honorably discharged.

And still another brother volunteered in the 12th Regulars, was wounded and taken prisoner, served his time of enlistment and received an honorable discharge.

Six brothers in one family!

Scarcely another family in the whole State of Michigan can make such an exhibit of patriotism as that.

Here are deeds that speak louder than words, giving evidence of a self-sacrificing heroism not describable in words; and all the surviving brothers still "vote as they shot" by a firm adhesion to the principles upon which the Republican party was founded.

In the spring of 1865 Benjamin was elected Supervisor of Richmond Township, which then comprised the entire county.

In the fall of 1866 he was elected Surveyor of the territory of Osceola and Mecosta, then included in one county, and held the position two years.

Since the organization of the county he has officiated as Superintendent of the Poor, a number of terms as Justice of the Peace, and has served several times as Director of the County Fair.

He has been also a Director of the Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company of Osceola, Lake and Wexford Counties.

Mr. Gooch is a Republican in the completest sense of the term.

He did not vote for President on becoming of suitable age, being 90 miles from his polling place.

His first Presidential vote was cast for John C. Fremont, and his suffrage has been cast in an undeviating line for the nominees of the Republican National Convention.

He took an active part in the Blaine and Logan campaign.

He is a member of the fraternity of Masons and belongs to the "Old Settlers' Union " of Mecosta County.

A fact worthy of note is that Mr. Gooch, D. A. Blodgett, and Luther O. Schofield, the three first settlers in the vicinity of Hersey, used neither whisky nor tobacco in any form.

Mr. Gooch brought the first cow, pig and hens into the county.

His portrait appears on another page, and will receive a hearty welcome from the pioneer patrons of this work, as well as from later settlers of Osceola County, who have learned his worth as a man, neighbor and citizen.

Desdemona (Harrington) Gooch

He was married Oct. 17, 1865, in Ionia, Mich., to Desdemona Harrington.

Sylvia E., adopted daughter, was born June 8, 1868, in the State of New York.

Mr. and Mrs. Gooch are of the class who grow old gracefully.

They rank among the bon camarades of 1 their generation, as is exemplified by an account of a 'maple sugar frolic which transpired in their "sugar bush" in the season of 1884, and at which were present representatives from all classes, conditions and generations.

The assembly disposed of the proceeds of nine barrels of sap in the course of two hours!

The central source of enjoyment was the complete manufacturing system of the works, consisting of pipes, pans, siphons and fire arches.

Mr. Gooch has 600 buckets and hundreds of trees, and the gathering is done by horse-power.

The occasion was one of the most satisfactory of local county entertainments.

Mrs. Desdemona Harrington Gooch was born in Charleston, N. H., one chilly day in October, the 17th, more than 50 years ago (1830 or 31), but was born in the day-time, however, and has loved the light ever since and kept cool.

When a child of seven or eight years her parents left their Eastern home and moved West and commenced pioneer life in the near vicinity of Grand Rapids.

There were no district schools in those days in that region, and she was taught at home with her younger sister and brother by an elder sister who had been educated in the East.

Before she was 16 she had read Rollins' Ancient History and Josephus, besides Scott's and Byron's poems, and worse yet, Young's Night Thoughts, Milton's Paradise Lost and other similar productions.

Her mind did not give way, however, as might be supposed.

She didn't even die, but came very near it; was very sick for more than a year, and was only saved by a kind mother's intelligent care.

She recovered, and went to Grand Rapids, which had grown somewhat, and attended Prof. Everett's Academy. The Professor was a man of gigantic intellect, and she nearly worshiped him for his knowledge.

Mrs. Everett taught the female department, was remarkably sweet-tempered and agreeable, as gentle and considerate as a kind mother to all her pupils.

Both of them understood making learning a delight, and she loved them both, and does yet.

She left the academy to teach a district school, but returned again in company with her younger sister, after which she taught the village school of Newaygo a year, rode thither from home, a distance of 36 miles, on horseback (no stage-coach nor railroad from Grand Rapids to Newaygo then),—rode a vicious black horse belonging to Benj. Wright, who then carried the weekly mail between the two places.

Nearly every foot of the road led through dense, primeval forest, but she enjoyed its gloomy grandeur, also the spirited paces of the horse. He would pace, trot or gallop, at the behest of his rider.

And here let it be stated, the same horse carried home the teacher in addition to the weight of the mail bags, when the school term was done.

Then she attended the union school on the east side one term to study French and the higher mathematics.

She also taught one term in the same school while Rev. James Ballard was Principal. Meanwhile Grand Rapids had become an incorporated city.

Afterwards she taught two years in succession in the upper department of the same school when Prof. Chesebro was Principal.

Her health began to fail, went home to rest, then taught the village school at Laphamville (now Rockford) several terms, after which she taught the winter term of school in 1860-1 in Big Rapids.

She returned home and commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Henderson, of Grand Rapids.

Helped run a soldiers' aid society during the war of the Rebellion (being Secretary of the same) and continued teaching off and on till the close of the war, when she was married.

Mrs. Gooch is the daughter of John and Phebe (Field) Harrington.

Her parents were natives of Vermont, where they were married, and after a residence of some years removed to New Hampshire, coming thence in 1838 to Kent Co., Mich.

Daniel Field, the maternal grandsire of Mrs. Gooch, descended from an ancient English family, whose record was traceable back to its two Norman and Saxon sources.

He married Hannah Whitman, and they became the parents of 13 children, all of whom are deceased.

The sturdy, independent traits which distinguished the stocks in which their families had their origin, have marked each successive generation and are faithfully reproduced in the character of Mrs. Gooch.

 

Frank Shields, farmer, section 17, Rose Lake Township, is a son of Alexander and  Jane (Robertson) Shields, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Scotland.

Sometime after their marriage in Scotland the parents emigrated to the American continent, and after a residence for a time in Canada they came, in 1864, to the Peninsular State and settled in Kalamazoo County.

Mr. Shields, senior, died in Canada while on a visit to his daughter.

The subject of this sketch was born on "Scotia's Isle," Feb. 22, 1841, and was almost 12 years old when the family emigrated to America.

In 1861 he came to Kalamazoo County, lived about two years there, and then went to Allegan County, this State, where he was employed about 13 years by Kellogg, Sawyer & Co.

In the spring of 1876 he came to this county and purchased 80 acres of land in Rose Lake Township, but remained in the employment of Kellogg, Sawyer &Co. until the spring of 1880, when he settled upon his land, which he now occupies, and where he has 48 acres in a good tillable condition.

Mr. Shields is a citizen of high standing in his community, and has been honored with the office of Township Treasurer for a term of two years.

In his political views he sympathizes with the Prohibitionists, and as to religion both he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church.

The marriage of Mr. Shields to Miss Belle McGonegal took place at Battle Creek, Michigan, June 7, 1871.

She was born in Scotland September 15, 1852.

Her parents were William and Mary C. McGonegal were both natives of Ireland.

Mr. and Mrs. Shields have four children, namely, Nellie M.; Anna M.; Frank C.; and Lizzie B.

 

George H. Bassett, farmer, section 22, Le Roy Township, was born Sept. 16, 1845, in Licking Co., Ohio.

His father, William Bassett, was a native of Martha's Vineyard, and descended from French ancestry, who came to this continent in the early Colonial days in search of freedom from religious persecution.

He married Permelia Skeels, a native of the State of New York, of English and German extraction.

The family removed to Licking Co., Ohio, where the father died, in 1850, aged 40 years.

The mother died in Ohio, in January, 1879.

Mr. Bassett began his struggle for an independent livelihood at the age of 14 years, and operated as a laborer in various avenues until the advent of the rebellion.

He was early awakened to the dangers which assailed the Federal Government, and enlisted June 21, 186 1, in Co. C, 39th Ind. Vol. Inf. The regiment was afterwards mounted and became the Eighth Ind. Vol. Cav., and was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland, Gen. Buel, Corps Commander.

Among the battles in which Mr. Bassett was in action were the celebrated engagements at Shiloh, Corinth, Bridgeport, Ala.; and at the conflict of Stone River, Dec. 31, 1862, he was wounded by a rifle ball, the shot entering the joint of the left hip, whence it was extracted three weeks later.

In September, 1863, he rejoined his regiment in Tennessee and continued in active service until the war was over.

He received an honorable discharge June 24, 1865, at Madison, Ind.

He was a second time wounded in the arm, in North Carolina, which was but a slight injury, and did not wholly disable him from duty.

On finding himself at liberty to resume the life of a civilian he came to Bluffton, Wells Co., Ind., where he was employed in a saw-mill until 1867, when he came to Saginaw County, Mich. In the spring of 1868 he made a homestead claim of 80 acres of land in Le Roy Township, and later entered a similar claim on section 8.

He was one of the first of the permanent settlers in the township previous to its organization, which he was largely instrumental in effecting.

In the fall of 1878 he exchanged the tract of land on which he had resided more than 10 years for 80 acres of land which is now his homestead, and of which 30 acres is under improvement.

He is a Republican in political preference, and from the beginning of his residence in Le Roy Township has been active in the promotion of its local interests.

He has officiated as Supervisor seven years, as Township Clerk one year, Treasurer two years, and in other positions of less importance.

Mr. Bassett's marriage to Alice Randolph took place Dec. 25, 1875.

They have no children, but adopted two,—Lennie and Edith. The latter is not living.

Mrs. Bassett was born in Allegany Co., N. Y., in March, 1855, and is the daughter of Jonathan F. and Almina (Eastwood) Randolph.

Her father is deceased.

He was born in Pennsylvania, and was a pioneer settler of Osceola County. Mr. and Mrs. Bassett belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

William Hoffmeyer, farmer, Section 17, Richmond Township, was born in Allen County, Indiana, April 22, 1846.

His parents were natives of Germany.

William spent his life in his native State until the fall of 1875.

He then came to Mecosta County, Michigan where he has since resided.

At present he own 80 acres of land, of which he has 20 acres subdued for cultivation and in good condition.

He has held the office of School Moderator.

Both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church.

Mr. Hoffmeyer was married in the village of Big Rapids, Michigan, on the first day of April 1873 to Frederika Traptrow, who was born in Germany August 14, 1847.

Mr. and Mrs. Hoffmeyer had six children, one of whom died in inancy.

The names of the living are Fred, Susanna, Ida, may and Emma.

 

Peter Carlson, farmer and stockman, resident on section 27, Le Roy Township, was born Sept. 29, 1832, in the southern part of the kingdom of Sweden.

His father was a farmer in that country and died when the son was about three years old.

His mother remained the guardian of her seven children, and Mr. Carlson was in her maternal care until her death, when he was 15 years of age.

He then found himself thrown on his own resources, and he engaged as a farm assistant.

He was occupied in that manner until 1860, when he was married, in Sweden, to Betty Swantson.

They have had 10 children, three of whom are deceased,—Tilda (1st), John (1st) and Nannie; Ida, Charles, August, John (2d), Tilda (2d), Alma and Francis yet survive.

Mrs. Carlson was born in July, 1835, in Sweden.

After marriage MY Carlson purchased a farm in Sweden and was its manager until his removal to the United States in 1870.

He sold the place before setting out for America.

Landing at the port of Boston he resided there a brief time and proceeded to Troy, N. Y., whence he went to the State of Indiana.

Later he made another removal, to Lamont, Ill., where he was employed in quarrying stone.

He arrived with his family in Osceola County in 1872 and purchased a farm of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company, which included 40 acres of land, and was situated on section 27, Le Roy Township.

Sometime after, he sold the place and purchased 80 acres located in a different part of the same section.

To this he has added 80 acres by subsequent purchase, and has improved 50 acres and erected excellent farm buildings.

Mr. Carlson is a Republican of decided character, and, with his wife, belongs to the Lutheran Church.

 

James B. Sprague, farmer, section 30, Rose Lake Township, is a son of Harlow C. and Angeline (Sayles) Sprague, the former a native of New York State and the latter of Canada.

They married and settled in Ionia Co., Mich., but afterward moved to Indiana and, after a residence there for a time, to the State of Iowa.

In 1871 they came to Osceola County and located in Rose Lake Township, where they still reside.

Of their eight children, three are deceased, - L Sarah, Rebecca and Silas.

The living children are Jasper, Francis, Amelia J., Almeria and James B.

The latter, the youngest of the family and the subject of this biographical outline, was born Feb. 24, 1862, in Lake Co., Ind., and remained with his parents until the present time.

In the spring of 1884 he was elected Township Clerk, having served in that capacity a short time previous to his election, by appointment.

In his views of national issues he advocates the principles of the Republican Party.

 

Daniel S. Taplin, M. D., practicing physician and surgeon, at Reed City, was born in Orleans Co., Vt., July 31, 1844.

His parents, Richard and Susan (Ordway) Taplin, were life-long residents of the Green Mountain State.

The former died Feb. 9, 1853, in Orleans ^\ County, aged 38 years.

The mother died in the same place, in November, 1865.

Five of their seven children are living,—Julia, George, Mary, Daniel and Merrick.

At the age of 22, Dr. Taplin followed the fashion of his forefathers and bought a farm in Irasburg in his native county.

In 1870 he disposed of his landed interests and engaged in the business of cotton manufacturing for some years, after which he became a student in the office of Dr. J. Conant at Great Falls, N. H, where he read medicine preparatory to attending lectures, three years.

He entered Detroit Medical College, and continued his studies and afterwards entered upon his career at Manton, Mich., and practiced six years.

In the winter of 1879-80 he attended the Eclectic Medical Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was graduated in the spring of 1880.

He established his permanent business at Reed City in September, 1881, and has secured a fair recognition in his profession.

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Dr. Taplin was married June 2, 1876, to Mary Abbott, daughter of Sheldon and Sarah (Cawley) Abbott, natives of Vermont, where Mrs. Taplin, the fifth child of a family of six, was born, at Barton, Dec. 28, 1841, and where the father is still living, at the age of 88 years.

He is an extensive farmer and lumberman.

The mother died at that place in 1853.

 

William L. Hooper, mechanical engineer and farmer on section 28, Le Roy Township, was born Aug. 13, 1837.

His father, Richard Hooper, was born in England and bred to the vocation of ship carpenter.

He married Augusta Lancaster, and later emigrated to Oxford Co., Ont.

Soon after their arrival in the Dominion of Canada their son was born.

The father became Superintendent of the Canada Ship-building Company, in which capacity he operated many years.

He is now 84 years of age, and resides in Woodstock, Oxford Co., Ont.

The wife and mother is 80 years old, and the pair of octogenarians are in the possession of perfectly preserved faculties of mind and body.

Both grandsires of Mr. Hooper passed most of their lives in the British naval service.

His maternal grandfather died from the effects of a fall from a ladder while on duty, breaking his neck thereby.

He was 94 years of age.

The mother was born on shipboard in Plymouth Harbor, and was brought up on the sea.

Mr hooper remained in the place of his nativity until he was 20 years of age.

On the 17th of February, 1861, he left his home for San Francisco, Cal., and operated a short time as a miner in the Golden State, but on the outbreak of the gold excitement in British Columbia he proceeded there and entered into a company for mining purposes; but, the venture proving unprofitable, the relation was soon dissolved, and Mr. Hooper engaged in the capacity of engineer, of which he had acquired a practical knowledge in San Francisco, entering the employment of J. G. Jackson, a prominent miller and lumberman of Mendocino Co., Cal.

He continued in the same position 12 years, obtaining a large salary.

Meanwhile he made seven visits to his parents in Canada. He was a prominent musician, and connected with several brass bands.

The exposure to which he was subjected in his business resulted in a partial paralysis of his lower limbs, and by medical advice he determined to come East.

On May 8, 1876, he started for the city of Philadelphia, but on reaching Ann Arbor, Mich., the home of the parents of his wife, a change in plans was made, and they went to Ontario.

By advice he decided to come to Northern Michigan, and he accordingly bought 80 acres in the township of Le Roy.

The place has since been his homestead, and from a slightly improved state when he became its owner he has brought nearly all the acreage into a valuable condition, having 56 acres under good cultivation.

Dec. 27, 1883, his residence and a part of its contents were destroyed by fire, and in its place he has since erected a large frame house, at a cost of $1,500.

He is a Democrat in political persuasion.

Mr. Hooper was first married in January, 1867, in Woodstock, Ont., to Margaret Cumming.

She was born in Scotland, and died March 17, 1869, in San Francisco, of heart disease, aged 36 years, leaving a daughter,—Margaret A.

The latter was born in California Aug. 20, 1868, and resides with her grandparents in Canada.

She is a cultivated young lady, and is on the eve of receiving her third diploma from the Ontario College, which completes her course of study.

Mr. Hooper was again married, March 13, 1872, in Dexter, Mich., to Lizzie H. Edwards.

Six children have been born of their union,—Percy W., Emma G, Daisy M., Charles R., Eugene L. and Alice E. Mrs. Hooper was born Aug. 14, 1851, in Ann Arbor, and is the daughter of Thomas and Louise (Kellett) Edwards.

Her parents were born in New York State, and are both deceased.

She was educated in the schools of Ann Arbor, and is a member of the Baptist Church.

Mr. Hooper was brought up in the Church of England.

 

Belah G. Moulton, farmer, section 18, Rose Lake Township, was born in the county of Jefferson, State of New York, on the 14th of February, 1846.

He was brought up at the home of his parents, and was 12 years of age when his parents removed to this State with their family.

At the early age of 18, Mr. Moulton demonstrated his willingness to sacrifice his health and even life for the support of the legitimate Government of his country, by enlisting, Feb. 26, 1864, in the 13th Mich. Vol. Inf., and serving honorably until the close of the war.

He then returned to Allegan Co., Mich., where he purchased a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits.

He continued there until the fall of 1871, when he came to this county and settled upon a quarter section of land in Rose Lake Township, of which he had taken possession under the provisions of the homestead laws the previous spring.

At the present time he owns a fine farm of 320 acres, and has almost 200 acres in a state of good cultivation.

In 1881-2 he erected a magnificent barn, 38 x 76 feet in dimensions, with a wing 32 x 64 feet.

The horse barn is 30 x 40 feet in size.

In quality these buildings are second to none in this entire county.

Mr. Moulton's business capacity and integrity have been attested by his election to the offices of County Superintendent of the Poor for four years, Supervisor of Rose Lake Township four years, Township Treasurer three years, etc., etc. In respect to political issues he is classed with the Republican Party, and in religion he, as well as his wife, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Mr. Moulton's parents, Belah D. and Corinda J. (Walls) Moulton, were natives of the Empire State, and their children were, in order, Irving L., Belah G. and Ida J.

The subject of this sketch was married in Martin Township, Allegan County, Dec. 6, 1871, to Miss Mary C., daughter of Cortland B. and Clarissa (Snyder) Smith.

She was born in Otsego Coonty, N. Y., May 4, 1851.

Her father was a native of Vermont and her mother was born in New York State.

They came to Michigan in 1854, settling in Allegan County, locating in Rose Lake Township, where they now reside.

Mr. and Mrs. Moulton are the parents of seven children, namely: Forest R., Belah D., Charley B., Myrtle M., Earl L., Verne V. and Harry G.

 

Albert B. Sawyer, lumberman at Sawyerville, Rose Lake Township, was born in Charlemont, Franklin Co., Mass., Oct. 4, 1820, the youngest son in the family of six children; from the age of 6 to 18 years he lived away from home, his mother having died when he was young.

He was brought up on a farm, and from the age of 18 to 22 he worked out in that vocation by the month.

According to his inherited nature as a Yankee, he then struck out as a peddler, in which business he continued for a period of six years.

About the year 1850 he moved to Ohio and remained in that State about two years, engaged in the stove business.

This he sold out, and came to Michigan, locating in Wayland, Allegan County.

During the following year he was engaged in different occupations, and then he was employed by Israel Kellogg for almost nine years, stocking the mill and piling lumber.

Next, he returned to the village of Heath, in the same county, and formed a partnership with David Coy in the business of running a steam saw-mill.

Two years afterward Mr. Coy sold out his interest in the mill to Israel Kellogg, Mr. Sawyer's former employer at Wayland.

They continued together some two or three years, when Mr. Kellogg made his son, J. E. Kellogg, a present of his interest in the business.

This relation continued about five years, when they closed in that county.

In 1871 Mr. Sawyer came to Osceola County and purchased 3,000 acres of timbered land. In the spring of that year, in company with J. E. Kellogg, he commenced the erection of the steam saw-mill at

"Sawyerville," named in his honor.

Here they employ, on an average, 40 men the year round, the mill having a capacity of 100,000 feet of lumber daily.

In 1872 they also built a tram road from Sawyerville to LeRoy, for the purpose of conveying their lumber to the railroad.

In the fall of the same year, Mr. Sawyer erected a fine residence, which he has since occupied.

When he located his mill here, not a stump was to be seen between Sawyerville and Le Roy.

He cut the way through in order to get in his boilers and heavy machinery for the mill.

During the winter seasons they put in large numbers of logs, sometimes exceeding 10,000,000 feet.

In their work they have 50 horses and oxen.

They also own two stores, one at Sawyerville and one at Le Roy, where they have an extensive trade.

In politics Mr. S. is a staunch Republican.

His parents, Elias and Harriet (Williams) Sawyer, were natives of Massachusetts, married in Charlemont, and resided there during their lives, the father a carpenter and joiner by trade.

They had six children, namely, Ellsworth, Ethan, Charles, Emily, Albert E. and Persis.

Mr. Sawyer was married in June, 1861, to Ann Ritchey, of Martin, Allegan Co., Mich.

They have five children,—Mary Jane, Willard W., Alice, Isabella and Albert B.

 

Charles M. Pierson, section 31, in Hersey Township, was born March 6, 1855, at Pierson, Montcalm County, Michigan, where his parents, George M. and Nancy E. (Peck) Pierson, are now living.

They have been residents of Montcalm County since the fall of 1854, when they removed there from the State of New York, and made a home in the depths of the wilderness, so unbroken and new that they were obliged to cut their road to their location from the main route of travel for several miles.

The father was twice married and has three children by his first wife, viz.: Theodore M., Florello J. and George J. Charles M., Thomas P., Mary E., Albert L. and Minnie L. are the children of the second marriage.

Mr. Pierson is the eldest of the children born of the second marriage and remained under his father's care until he was of age, when, in 1876, he came to Hersey Township and bought 116 acres of land of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company.

He has improved about 33 acres and erected a good farm house, and is rapidly establishing his property in the most desirable condition. Mr. Pierson is a Democrat in political sentiment.

He was married Dec. 25, 1877, to Eva E. Hastings, and they have two children,—George E., born Aug. 17, 1882, and Grace E., born June 19, 1884.

Mrs. Pierson was born April 27, 1856, in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of Edward H. and Mary E. (Streeter) Hastings, who are now residents of Lakeview, Montcalm Co., Mich.

Their children—Eva E., Etta A. (see sketch of F. T. Turner), Ethan E. and Ina May—are all living.

 

Wilhelm Blank, dealer in dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, flour, feed, corn, oats, lath, shingles, lime, cement and other building materials; also wines, liquors, beer, tobacco and cigars, at Reed City.

He was born May 20, 1845, in Natzton, Germany.

He was a herder and farmer in his native country, and emigrated in 1868 to the United States.

He passed the first two months after his arrival on this continent in Baltimore, coming thence to a locality in the vicinity of Chicago, tarrying there but a brief time, and proceeding to Wisconsin, 'and eventually to Michigan.

He went to Morley, Mecosta County, and engaged in railroad construction, from May, 1869 to 1870.

In 1870 he came to Reed City, and in June, 1871, opened a saloon which he conducted until 1874, when he added the balance of the stock, the entire catalogue representing a value of about $6,000.

Mr. Blank was an early comer to Reed City, and in company with E. Trout bought a railroad shanty, which they managed jointly six months, since which time Mr. Blank has operated alone.

He also owns, besides his store, 160 acres of land near Reed City, and two houses and lots in the city.

His marriage to Bertha Kuehl occurred Jan. 19, 1875, at Reed City, and they have two children: Charles, born Nov. 15, 1876, and William, born March 11, 1878.

Mrs. Blank was born in Germany, Jan. 16, 1848.

 

John Riggs, farmer, section 22, Le Roy Township, was born Feb. 14, 1834, in Bourbon Co., Ky.

His father was of New England parentage and of English lineage, was a mechanic in Kentucky and in 1840 removed his family to Shelby County and later to Mercer Co., Ohio.

The mother, Rachel (Plummer) Riggs, was born in 1805, and is a descendant from genuine "Blue-Grass" ancestry.

She resides with her daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth J. Bailey, in Le Roy village.

Mr. Riggs was a child of six years when his parents moved to the Buckeye State, where they resided for a time in Pickway, Shelby County.

After the death of his father, he succeeded to the cares and responsibilities of the family, being the oldest of three children left fatherless, and has since cared principally for his widowed mother.

He was married in Auglaize Co., Ohio, to Sarah A. Bennett.

She was born in Shelby County, and reared there and in the county where she was married.

Her parents were well-to-do farmers in the Buckeye State.

Eight children have been born to herself and husband, four of whom are deceased - Elizabeth, Thomas G., an infant and Rachel.

Those surviving are Permelia F., Emma A., Ida F. and Martha J. My

After marriage Mr. Riggs followed the trade of a shoemaker until the folly of the Southern States culminated in armed rebellion, and he entered the army before the war had passed through the first year of its existence.

He enlisted March 22, 1862, in the 57th Ohio Inf., Co. C, and the regiment was attached to the command of General Sherman.

He was a sharer of the chances of war in some of the most hotly contested battles in which the corps of General Sherman was involved and was wounded June 22, 1864, at Kenesaw Mountain, receiving a gunshot wound in the left eye.

He remained in a hospital until the close of the war.

After receiving his discharge he resumed his trade at Coldwater, Mercer Co., Ohio, remaining there until the date of his removal to Michigan.

In 1869 he came to Paris, Mecosta County, where he worked as a shoemaker a few years, coming meanwhile to this township and county, where he located the farm on which he now resides, and of which he took possession in 1870.

He owns 80 acres of land, of which he has improved all but 10 acres, and placed it in fine farming condition.

He adheres to inflexible Republican principles in his political views.

He has been Justice of the Peace and has also discharged the duties of minor official positions.

The family belongs as members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

Sylvester Bowker, a farmer on section 32, Rose Lake Township, was born in Cayuga Co., N. Y., on the fourth day of February, in the year 1847.

He received a common-school education and remained in his native State until 1867, when he came to Barry Co., Mich.

Residing there until the spring of 1869, he came to this county and homesteaded 80 acres of land in Rose Lake Township, where he has since made it his residence.

He now owns 120 acres of land, and has 74 acres of the same in a fair state of cultivation.

He thus has a very fine farm, for this pioneer country.

Mr. Bowker has been entrusted with public office of some responsibility, having been School Director, Overseer of Highways, Vice President and Director of the Osceola, Lake and Wexford Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company.

The marriage of Mr. Bowker to Miss Carrie Brogden took place Feb. 6, 1867, in Cayuga Co., N. Y.

She was the daughter of Abraham and Catherine (Gay) Brogden, and was born in Cortland Co., N. Y., July 16, 1842.

Mr. and Mrs. B. now have two children, namely, Katie S. and Clifton.

The parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. B., in his principles of national government, is a Democrat.

His parents, Jefferson and Sophronia (Henderson) Bowker, were natives of the State of New York, and married and settled in Tompkins County, that State.

The former died in Cayuga County, in the Empire State, in 1857, and the latter is still living.

 

Horton B. Peck, dentist at Reed City, was born Dec. 8, 1828, in the township of Butler, Wayne Co., N. Y.

Horace Peck, his father, was born May 24, 1789, in Connecticut, and died in Butler, Nov. 15, 1865, aged 77 years.

His mother, Anna (Burch) Peck, was born April 1, 1793, in Washington Co., N. Y., and died in August, 1878, in Butler.

They had nine children.

Mr. Peck learned the jeweler's business when he was 17 years of age, and after completing his term of service went to the academy at Clyde, Wayne Co., N. Y., and spent a year there as a student.

On the termination of his studies he engaged as a salesman in a drug store, where he was occupied six months.

In November, 1848, he began to prepare for his profession, and after five years of practice he opened an office at Wolcott, Wayne Co., N. Y., pursuing dentistry there 13 years.

He went thence to South Butler, in the same county, and operated there jointly in the drug business and as a dentist.

In August, 1866, he came to Lowell, Kent Co., Mich., and entered upon his profession of practical dentist, operating at that point six years.

He moved to Middleville, remaining six months, going thence to Caledonia and entering the drug business.

He settled at Reed City in 1875.

His office was the first in the line of dentistry established at that point, and Dr. Peck has succeeded in establishing a first-class trade.

Dr. Peck is a charter member of the first lodges of Masons and Odd Fellows at Reed City.

He was Town Clerk in the township of Butler, Wayne County, and has officiated two years as Treasurer of Reed City.

His marriage to Phebe J. Calkins occurred April 20, 1854, in Westbury, Wayne Co., N. Y.

Mrs. Peck was born Feb. 4, 1835, in Butler Township.

The family includes five children: Annie J., born in Wolcott, N. Y., March 22, 1857, married Cornelius Crawford, a druggist in Caledonia, Kent Co., Mich.; Nathaniel W. was born Aug. 28, 1859, in Wolcott, N. Y., and is a jeweler at Reed City; Bethiah C., born July 15, 1864, in Wolcott, N. Y., married Clark Williams, of Reed City, baggage master in the employment of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad corporation; Sarah C. was born April 11, 1867, in Lowell, Mich.; Fred L., born May 16, 1872, in Lowell, is the youngest child.

 

Frank T. Turner, farmer, section 29, Hersey Township, was born Aug. 27, 1852, in in Foxcroft Township, Piscataquis Co., Maine.

His parents, Bradman A. and Fidelia Turner, are natives of Maine and still reside in the county above named.

They have four sons,—Charles P., Frank T., Walter L. and George A., all of whom are living.

Mr. Turner passed the years of his minority on his father's farm.

In the fall of 1872 he came to Michigan and worked two winters in the lumber woods, after which he returned to his native State, where he operated as a farm assistant by the month, nearly two years.

In March, 1875, he came to Detroit, going thence after a brief stay to Montcalm County, where he operated the winter subsequent in the lumber woods.

In March following, he engaged in farming in the same county, becoming interested also in lumbering in its various branches.

He came to Hersey Township in the spring of 1881 and purchased the property on which he has established his homestead.

It comprised 40 acres of land in a wholly wild condition, of which he has cleared and improved 15 acres.

Mr. Turner is present Township Treasurer (1884), in which position he is serving his second term.

He is also School Assessor.

He was married June 3, 1878, to Etta A. Hastings, and they have one child - Ethan Altan - born May 12, 1882.

Mrs. Turner was born Jan. 15, 1860, in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of Edward H. and Mary E. (Streeter) Hastings.

They are residents of Montcalm County and are the parents of four children.

Mr. Hastings was born in Vermont; his wife is a native of St. Lawrence Co., N. Y.

Mr. Turner is a Republican in political opinion, and, with his wife, is a member of the Methodist Church.

 

Loren Blanchard, farmer, resident on section 32, Hersey Township, was born Jan. 27, 1831, in the town and county of Onondaga, N. Y.

His father was English by descent, and was a farmer all his life and married Susan Fellows, of New England origin.

Mr. Blanchard was a resident of Onondaga until he attained to man's estate, when he bought a farm in Marcellus Township.

Four years later he sold the place and returned to his native town, became a land-holder and lived there nearly seven years.

In the spring of 1861 he bought 160 acres of land in Washtenaw Co., Mich.

In 1867 he sold the place and removed to Ann Arbor to obtain better educational advantages for his children.

A year later he returned to the neighborhood whence he had removed, and bought a farm which he occupied seven years.

In the spring of 1877 he came to Hersey Township, where he made a permanent location.

He was in financial difficulties when he came to Osceola County, and he bought his farm, teams and cows on time, relying on energy and industry to enable him to overcome his indebtedness, which he has accomplished, and has added 80 acres to his possessions in company with his son Arthur.

Mr. Blanchard was married in the fall of 1852 to Esther Marsh.

She was born Jan. 5, 1833.

They have three children: Augusta M., born Aug. 24, 1853; Arthur J,; Irving B. born September 3, 1860.

Mrs. Blanchard is the adopted daughter of Ebenezer and Rebecca Carr.

The former died in Manlius, New York; the latter died in 1878, in Washtenaw County, Michigan.

Mr. Blanchard is a republican and with his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

David Mason, deceased, formerly a farmer on section 32, Richmond Township, was born Oct. 12, 1829, in Essex Co., New York.

He married Sally Fairbanks and settled in Chautauqua County, in the Empire State.

Later he removed to Pennsylvania, and came thence in the spring of 1877 to Osceola County.

He purchased 80 acres of land on which he operated until his death.

Three children constitute the issue of his first marriage, - Frank A., Flora and an infant who received the name of the surviving sister, and who died in extreme infancy.

The mother died in Chautauqua County, and Mr. Mason subsequently married Christina Albord, a resident of the same county. Two children - Lynn A. and Alice M. - were born to them.

Mr. Mason was an influential and leading citizen of Richmond Township, where he was an early settler in the history of the township.

He died March 4, 1884, and ten days later was followed by his wife, who died March 14, 1884.

 

John Johnson, farmer, section 27, LeRoy Township, was born November 6, 1844, in Wexshire, Sweden.

His father, John Johnson Senior is living in the same place in the “old country”, and is 85 years of age.

His mother, Augra (Guhands) Johnson, has attained the same age.

They have been farmers all their lives and reared their sons to do the same thing.

Mr. Johnson became self-sustaining when he was 12 years old.

He came to the United States with a brother.

They made their first stop at Muskegon, where they were employed in a saw-mill; they went thence to Grand Rapids and found employment as laborers in the construction of a railroad.

They made their way next to Indiana and from there to Illinois, where they labored together on the Green River Canal.

They returned to Grand Rapids, where they operated a year, and in 1869 purchased 80 acres of land of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company together.

They purchased 80 acres additional at a letter date, of which they are still joint owners, and which is in excellent farming condition, with fine buildings including a valuable residence.

Mr. Johnson was married December 19, 1877, at LeRoy to Johanna Carlyle, and they have three children, Johanna E.; Charles A.; and Amanda.

The mother was born in Sweden, October 13, 1859.

Her parents were farmers in that country and in 1870 emigrated with her family to the United States, locating in Illinois.

They became residents of LeRoy Township in 1873.

Mr. Johnson is a republican in political faith and principals and sustains the issue of that element.

He and his wife belong to the Lutheran Church.

 

Warren S. Denniston, farmer, section 32 Hersey Township, was born Oct. 8, 1854, in Eckford Township, Calhoun Co., Mich.

His parents, Samuel and Rosanna (Fenton) Denniston, are members of the community of farmers in Eckford Township, Calhoun County.

His father was born on Grand Island in the Niagara River, and is about 65 years of age.

His mother is 55 years old.

They had eight children, - Alice, John M., Warren S., Asahel A., Rosanna (deceased), Mary, Emory (deceased) and Elmer.

Mr. Denniston was married in 1874, when he was 20 years of age, and remained at home until he attained his majority.

On reaching that period he assumed the management of his father's farm, which he conducted two years.

In 1877 he purchased a small tract of land, on which he resided about 18 months.

At the expiration of that time he sold his home and again became interested in the management of the family homestead, continuing to operate thereon two years, when, in December, 1880, he came to his present location in Osceola County.

He bought 40 acres, which included 10 acres already chopped, three acres logged and without buildings.

He erected a log domicile in which he resided one year, and it is now utilized as a hen-house.

Within the short time he has been a resident of the place he has placed 36 acres under thorough cultivation, doing nearly all the necessary work himself.

He is a Republican in political faith and action.

Mr. Denniston was married July 20, 1874, to Elva F. Hart.

Two children have been born to them, - Melinda S., April 12, 1875, in Walton Township, Eaton Co., Mich., and Ora L., June 19, 1884, in Hersey Township.

Mrs. Denniston was born Nov. 5, 1854, in Walton, and is the daughter of William and Judith A. (Stone) Hart, the former of whom was born Dec. 10, 1814, and the latter in 1820, - both in the State of New York.

They died near Olivet, Eaton Co., Mich.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. a Denniston were born in the order here named: Ada M., Alanson M. (deceased), Eber D., Carrie, Elva F. and Eunice A.

 

Anson Berger, farmer, section 34, Richmond Township, was born Oct. 13, 1835, in Germany, and is the son of John and Catherine Berger.

The parents emigrated to the United States from Germany, and settled in Wayne Co., N. Y., where the mother died in 1861, and where the father still resides, aged 84 years.

They had a family of eight children.

Mr. Berger is the youngest son, and was in infancy when his parents became residents of the State of New York.

He has lived in Osceola County since 1856, when he bought 80 acres of land in Richmond Township.

His farm now includes 85 acres, of which all but 20 acres is in tillage.

Mr. Berger is politically identified with the Republican Party.

He has been Constable three years, besides having officiated as School Assessor and Overseer of Highways.

He was married in the township of Richmond, July 24, 1859 to Nancy M. Robbins.

Their children are eight in number; Anna L.; Carrie J.; Etta V.; Evaline K.; Ada R.; Franklin H.; Leona M.; and Nina M.

The first daughter is the wife of James W. Gregg of Pennsylvania.

Carrie married Clarence A. Whitney and lives in Duluth, Minnesota.

Mrs. Berger was born December 8, 1840, in Potter County Pennsylvania, and is the daughter of J. G. Robbins.

Mr. and Mrs. Berger are the first couple married in Osceola County.

 

Peter Gunkel, farmer, section 22, Le Roy Township, was born May 25, 1830, in Prussia.

He obtained the education required by the laws of his country, remaining at school until 14, when he was apprenticed to acquire the blacksmith's trade, serving nine years and six months.

He afterward entered the German army and was in the military service three years.

In 1856 he came to this continent, locating in Hamburg, Ont.

In May, 1857, he was married, in Ontario, to Mrs. Catherine (Bentley) Bender.

She was born in Hesse Darmstadt Aug. 2, 1832, and came to the American continent when 14, her father's family locating in the Dominion of Canada.

Her first husband died there about 1855, leaving her with one child, Katie.

Six children have been born of her second marriage, namely: Caroline, Oct. 25, 1859; August, July 5, 1861; Minnie, Feb. 28, 1863; Charles, Nov. 26, 1865; Eliza, Sept. 12, 1875; John, born Nov. 25, 1865, died Oct. 14, 1883.

After his marriage Mr. Gunkel followed his trade in Ontario until 1869, the year in which he removed his family to Michigan.

He was a pioneer settler in Le Roy Township, locating a homestead claim on which he has since been resident.

The period in which he became a citizen of the township was one of the severest in point of hardship for the settlers in the early history of Osceola County.

There was no work to be had.

For weeks, no salt could be obtained, and often there was no bread.

Sometimes a few potatoes could be procured, and only the abundant wild game in the forest prevented general suffering from actual starvation, which for a long period was imminent.

Mr. Gunkel succeeded in keeping "the wolf from the door," and as his family maintained good health he weathered the season of privation.

His farm is in excellent condition, with good and suitable farm buildings.

Mr. Gunkel is a Republican of the genuine stamp, realizing the full value of republican institutions to this generation.

He has educated his children, and his family are honored and respected, as they deserve.

The parents are members of the Lutheran Church.

 

Frank A. Mason, farmer on section 32, Richmond Township, is the son of David G. and Sally (Fairbanks) Mason.

(See sketch of D. G. Mason.)

He was born Jan. 16, 1851, in Chautauqua Co., N. Y.

He attended the schools of his native county until he was 13 years of age, and since that time he has been actively engaged in agricultural pursuits, working as a lumberman in the seasons of that business.

He owns 40 acres in Mecosta County, including 15 acres of improved land. In political faith and connection he is an adherent of the Republican Party.

He was married June 10, 1876, at Big Rapids, to Cynthia, daughter of Abner Joslin.

She was born in Pennsylvania, Aug. 3, 1844.

Henry L. Watson, Secretary and member of the Ashton Lumber Company, located at Dewey’s Station, Le Roy Township, was born April 9, 1857, in Onondaga County, New York.

His father, John Watson, was a descendant from New England ancestry and was born in New York.

He came to Grand Ledge, Michigan, where he was extensively engaged in lumbering.

His mother, Rebecca J. (Lee) Watson is also a native of the Empire State, and both parents are now residents at this place.

Henry Watson was 10 years old when his father transferred his family and interests to Michigan, where they settled in Eaton County, in the vicinity of Lansing.

Thence they went later to Grand Ledge, where Mr. Watson completed his education.

When he was 19 years of age he became self-sustaining and engaged as a saw-mill assistant in Ashland Township, Newaygo County.

He went thence to Baldwin, Lake County, where he engaged in teaching in the public schools.

Eventually he engaged with Dewing & Sons in the lumber business at Baldwin, their interests being transferred to Le Roy Township, this county, in the fall of 1880.

In the spring of 1883 the Ashton Lumber Company was organized, of which Mr. Watson was made Secretary, holding equal shares in the profits of the business.

Since the organization, he has acted as resident manager. He is an adherent of the Republican Party, and is Justice of the Peace.

He was married Sept. 23, 1877, at Grand Ledge, to Myra J. Lamson, and they have three children,— Edward H., Flora E. and Lee.

The parents of Mrs. Watson, Henry and Harriet (Robinson) Lamson, were born respectively in Vermont and New York, and were farmers.

The father is deceased. Mrs. Watson was born June 11, 1858, in Grand Ledge, where she was reared to womanhood.

 

Peter A. Auer, Clerk in the Second Comptroller’s Office in the Treasury Department at Washington, D. C, was born April 15, 1849, on the Rhine, Prussia.

His parents, John H. and Maria Auer, are natives of Prussia, and removed with their family in 1853 to the city of New York, and afterwards resided successively in Schenectady, Perry, Moscow and Mount Morris, in the Empire State, where his father pursued the business of tailor, later removing to Almont, Mich., and afterwards to Reed City.

(See sketch of J. H. Auer.)

Mr. Auer was carefully educated, and at 17 became a clerk in Almont.

He attended school after a year's service in that calling, and continued his

studies a similar period. In 1868 he interested him-self in insurance business, in which he operated two years.

In 1870 he engaged in teaching, in which he was occupied two years.

In October, 1872, tie came to Reed City and entered upon the pursuit of the same calling; also for a year was Deputy Postmaster.

He obtained a position as Clerk in the Treasury Department at the National Capital, and attended the Law Department of the Columbian University, where he was graduated, in the spring of 1877.

Since that date he has discharged the duties of his position in the Department, and at intervals has practiced as an attorney.

Mr. Auer was married in 1875, to Emma L. Patterson, daughter of J. Q. Patterson, of Reed City.

(See sketch of J. Q. Patterson.)

Mr. and Mrs. Auer have two children, namely: Harry, born May 10, 1878, and Nellie, born April 19, 1881.

In March, 1882, Mr. Auer was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of the United States, and is also qualified to practice in the Circuit Courts of Michigan, to which privilege he was admitted at Hersey.

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the Blue Lodge and Chapter.

 

Samuel A. Wells, a farmer on section 32 of Rose Lake Township, was born in Fayette County, Ind., June 17, 1844.

Until 1870 he lived in his native State, except what time he was in the army.

He enlisted in August, 1862, in the 75th Ind. Reg. Vol. Inf., served three years and came home unharmed.

In the year 1870 he came to Osceola County and "took up" 160 acres of valuable land in Rose Lake Township, under the special act of Congress relating to lands for soldiers.

Here he settled and has since lived, having 50 acres improved and in good tillable condition.

He was married in Huntington Co., Ind., to Lydia J. Shields, a native of that State, and they have one child, Mary Alice.

Mr. Wells' parents, John and Susanna Wells, were natives of North Carolina, who married and settled in the State of Indiana.

While working in a well, Mr. W. received injuries from which he died.

Mrs. W., his widow, is still living.

Mr. Wells, the subject of this sketch, has been honored with the public offices of Highway Commissioner, Justice of the Peace and School Assessor.

In political matters he sympathizes with the Republicans.

 

Will L. Beardsley, shingle-maker, resident in Hersey Mills on section 29, Cedar Township, was born Aug. 21, 1842, in Albany, N. Y.

He is the son of Leonard and Gertrude (Lamphier) Beardsley.

His father was a merchant in Albany and died there in 1852.

Both parents were natives of the State of New York.

The mother is still living, in Cannonsburg, Kent Co., Mich.

She was born in August, '824, and has been the mother of three children.

One daughter, Catherine C., is living; another daughter, Carrie, is deceased.

Mr. Beardsley came with his mother when 11 years of age, in 1853, the year succeeding the death of his father, to Grand Rapids, removing the following year to Cannonsburg.

His mother bought a farm and established thereon a mill for carding wool, in which pursuit, combined with farming, Mr. Beardsley was engaged about seven years.

Within the first year of the war he enlisted in Copany H, 21st Michigan Infantry.

The regiment was assigned to the Third Brigade, Second Division and in the corps of General McCook, attached to the Western Army.

Among the most important battles in which he was under fire were those of Perryville, Chattanooga, Chickamauga and Lookout Mountain.

He was in service throughout the war and received an honorable discharge in May, 1865.

He returned to Cannonsburg and resumed the occupations of former years.

In 1866 he began to operate as a land locater in the northeastern part of Michigan, in which he met with success until the financial stringency of 1873, which terminated his labors in that direction.

He engaged a year in farming, and in 1875 he opened a mercantile enterprise at Ada, Kent County.

He sold his business at the end of a year and became interested in lumbering at a point 15 miles north of Grand Rapids.

Four years later he erected a steam shingle-mill at the same point, where he operated a year, removing the mill thence in 1880 to Cedar Township, where it is still operating.

The business is prosperous and bids fair to be a permanency.

Mr. Beardsley is a Republican in political principle and action.

He served four years as Township Clerk while resident in Cannonsburg.

He was married Jan. 1, 1868, to Victoria Bell Livingston, and they have four children, viz.: Orlo M., Adazell, Ella Bell and Retta M.

Mrs. Beardsley was born Sept. 16, 1848, in Canada, and is the daughter of John and Malinda (Woods) Livingston.

Her parents died in Richmond, Ont.

Their other children were named as follows: Nancy M. (deceased), Sarah, Carrie E., Happy L., Ada, Harvey and John V.

 

David M. Tillman, farmer, section 33, Richmond Township, was born Feb. 13, 1852, in Allen Co, Ind.

John Tillman, his father, was born in Pennsylvania and married Sarah Castleman, a native of Ohio.

After their marriage they settled in Allen County, and are now resident there.

In their family have been six children,—Delilah, David, John, Margaret, Henry and a child that died in infancy.

Mr. Tillman of this personal account is the oldest son. He studied in the public schools until he was nearly 20 years of age, when he became a student in the Normal School at Valparaiso, in his native State.

At the age of 23, in 1877, he came to Osceola County.

He worked as a farm laborer by the month a short time, when he rented a farm, which he continued to manage two years.

In the summer of 1882 he bought the farm which now constitutes his homestead, and which contains 80 acres of land.

It was under some improvements, and at this writing - two years later - 50 acres of the place are subject to the plow.

Mr. Tillman is in affiliation with the Democratic Party and its issues.

He has officiated as School Director of the District in which he resides.

He was married Sept. 2, 1877, in Richmond Township to Ida M. Noyer, and their two children were born as follows; Lee C., September 28, 1880, and Frederick E., May 21, 1883.

Isaac J. and Catherine (Ole) Noyer, the parents of Mrs. Tillman, were natives of Pennsylvania.

She was born May 4, 1860, in Randolph County, Indiana.

Andrew H. Brandow

Andrew H. Brandow, lumberman and dealer in real estate at Evart, was born April 5, 1846, in Greene Co., N. Y.

His father, John H. Brandow, was in early life a farmer.

He was born in Greene Co., N. Y., Feb. 24, 1820, and was married June 8, 1844, to Abigail Hornbeck, a native of Sullivan Co., New York, born Feb. 28, 1824.

Andrew H. is the oldest of their children; Eli is a farmer in Hartwick Township; Nelson A. operates at Muskegon in the interests of William A. Daugherty, buying timber and logs; William B. died when 20 months old.

In March, 1860, the family came to Newaygo Co., Mich., where the father engaged in lumbering, and in 1865 formed a partnership with his son, in the prosecution of lumbering interests.

He is now retired and resides on a valuable farm comprising 120 acres in Croton Township, Newaygo Co., Mich.

In 1868 Mr. Brandow closed his business relations with his father and came to Osceola County, embarking as a contractor, putting in logs in the interest of non-residents, in which he operated extensively, the "put" amounting some years to 15,000,000 feet.

He was considered the heaviest operator for his age on the Muskegon at that date. He formed a partnership with John A. Bell, which was in existence and operative about seven years.

At the same time he owned a half interest in a sawmill at Evart, associated with W. A. Wightman, and also owned a shingle-mill located four miles north of Evart in Osceola Township.

His real-estate proprietorship includes about 7,000 acres, a third of which is in pine timber.

He owns a valuable farm in Algoma Township, Kent County, which is included in the limits of the village of Rockford, and is the proprietor of a farm of 80 acres in Missaukee Co., Mich.

In 1883 he formed a business association with Stephen F. Dexter, which continued one year.

In addition to his more important occupations, he deals in all variety of lumber products.

He is a member of the Order of Masonry.

Mr. Brandow was married June 13, 1871, in Rockford, Kent County, to Mary A. Pierson.

They have had one child, Arthur C, born April 10, 1874, in Evart, and died Aug. 8, of the same year.

Mrs. Brandow is the daughter of Aaron B. and Clarissa M. Pierson, and was born Nov. 25, 1852, in the State of New York.

The portrait of Mr. Brandow, accompanying this sketch, deservedly embellishes this Album, being that of a representative business man of this enterprising county.

 

Angus McKay, farmer, section 28, Hersey Township, is the proprietor of 200 acres of land where his homestead is located, on which he settled in March, 1882.

The farm was in a wild condition with the exception of a small "slashing."

He was born Sept. 1, 1854, in Oxford, Ontario Co., Ont., and is the son of William and Christina (Graham) McKay.

His father was a soldier in the British Army and belonged to the 93rd Highlanders, and after his removal from Scotland, his native country, to the Dominion of Canada, he was appointed a militia Captain.

He died Jan. 4, 1868, in East Zorra, Oxford Co., Ont., at the age of 75 years.

The mother is a native of Scotland and resides on the homestead in Ontario.

Mr. McKay was educated in the common schools of Canada, and was reared on a farm.

After reaching his majority he managed a portion of his father's farm, which had been divided into shares.

In March, 1882, he sold his interest and came to Hersey Township.

He has cleared and otherwise improved 32 acres of his farm.

He is a Republican in political sentiment and action.

His marriage took place Jan. 16, 1878, to Anna McKay, and they are now the parents of two children, - Agnes M., born May 18, 1880, and George A., June 4, 1882.

Mrs. McKay was born Sept. 19, 1856, in Oxford Co., Ont.

Her parents, Alexander and Dorothy (McDonald) McKay, were residents of West Zorra, where the father died Feb. 4, 1881; the demise of the mother occurred in May, 1863.

They had five sons and six daughters, all of whom are living.

 

Robert W. Hall, hardware merchant at Hersey, was born Oct. 20, 1853, in Oxford Co., Ont., and is the son of William and Mary (Pavey) Hall.

His father was a native of England, and after his emigration from the land of his birth he was a farmer in the Dominion of Canada, where he died about 1860.

Mr. Hall became an assistant in a mercantile establishment at Bell's Corners, on the Ottawa River, in Canada, where he operated three years, subsequently passing three years as a farm laborer.

In August, 1874, he came to Michigan, and operated two years as a lumberman in Osceola County, after which, in company with his brother John, he opened a store for the sale of general hardware merchandise, which they managed jointly five years.

At the end of that time Mr. Hall became the sole owner by purchase, and has since continued its management singly.

His stock of stoves, ranges, agricultural implements, etc., averages about $5,000.

He makes a specialty of the sale of Jewel stoves, deals in spouting and other building fixtures, and manages a fully equipped repair shop.

In 1880 he started a furniture store, associated with H. T. Lewis.

They were burned out in March, 1884, sustaining a loss of $1,000.

Mr. Hall has established a small furniture and undertaking business over his hardware store, and is doing a satisfactory business.

In 1881 he opened a harness shop, which is constantly stocked with an assortment of all goods common to similar establishments.

In 1884, with John H. Manning, he bought a saw and shingle mill in Hersey, with a capacity for the daily manufacture of 40,000 feet of lumber and 35,000 shingles, and requiring the assistance of 35 men.

During the season he has a threshing-machine in operation in the surrounding country, in charge of a competent manager.

Mr. Hall owns his residence and two lots therewith, and three other village lots; also 160 acres of pine land in Cedar Township.

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, - Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery.

He is also an Odd Fellow. He has officiated two years as Village Councilman, and is present President of Hersey village.

He was Treasurer of Richmond Township two years.

Mr. Hall's marriage to Maggie Beers occurred Jan. 2, 1882, in Baldwin, Lake Co., Mich., and they have one son, William, born June 4, 1884.

Mrs. Hall is the adopted daughter of Dr. Beers, who died near Hersey in 1878.

She was born in Portland, Mich., in 1862.

 

Daniel W. Gould, farmer, section 8, Highland Township, was born July 13, 1843, in the State of New York. His parents went when he was six months old to Stark Co., Ohio, and four years later removed to Calhoun Co., Mich. His father, Rev. Joseph Gould, was for a long period of years a minister in the Baptist Church. After growing old in the exercise of his parochial efforts, he retired, and at the time of his death was an inmate of the family of his son, James Gould, at Kalamazoo. He died in 1876, aged 86 years. Abigail Gould, the mother of Daniel W., was born in New England and was of English descent. She died in Athens Township, Calhoun Co., Mich., April 2, 1861, aged 65 years.

Mr. Gould is the youngest of four children born to his parents, and he was under parental control and attended school until the age of 18 years.

He entered the army of the Union during the first year of the Civil War, enlisting July 28, 1861, in the 44th Illinois Vol. Infantry, enrolling in Co. H.

The regiment was commanded by Colonel Noblesdoffs, and was assigned to the Army of the West.

Mr. Gould was in six different campaigns and 36 battles, among them Pea Ridge, Farinington, Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Resaca and others of equal importance.

He was present at the siege of Murfreesboro, Jonesboro and Franklin.

At the last he received a gunshot wound in the left side, which inflicted permanent injury.

He escaped capture by the rebels and was mustered out of service at Galveston,Texas, in September, 1865, after a period of active military service including four years and two months.

He returned, after his discharge, to Athens Township, Mich., and became a farmer, pursuing that profession there two years.

He set out for Osceola County in September, 1867, and entered the papers securing a homestead claim of 160 acres of land in Highland, - the second settler who came into the township, - and made a permanent location.

The stillness and quiet of the unbroken forest pervaded the entire surroundings, and he set himself vigorously to the task of converting the wilderness into a home.

He has since sold 80 acres, and has about seven-eighths of the remainder under improvements.

Mr. Gould is a Republican and true to the principles for which he braved the fate of war.

He has been Highway Commissioner and Treasurer of his Township.

His marriage to Jane Teal occurred July 3, 1865, in Battle Creek, and they are the parents of three children; Edith, Frank and Jennie.

Mrs. Gould was born in September, 1845, in Jefferson Co., N. Y.

Her father has been deceased some years.

Her mother resides in this township.

Mrs. Gould came to Michigan in 1861.

She and her husband belong to the Baptist Church, of which society Mr. Gould is Clerk.

 

John B. Byers, farmer, section 36, Burdell Township, was born April 29, 1838, in Bavaria.

At the age of eight years he found himself thrown on his own resources, and he earned his own living thenceforward as well as he could, until his marriage, which occurred Jan. 21, 1851, to Wealthy Bigameyer.

They have had nine children,—Henry, Mary, William, John, Charles, Anna, Ella, Frank and Delia.

The mother was born June 21, 1831, in Bavaria.

Two years after marriage Mr. Byers came to America.

He landed at the port of New York with his little family, and resided in that city about two years; he went thence into the country and passed four years as a general laborer.

In 1856 he went to Geauga Co., Ohio, where he operated as a farm laborer until the breaking out of the Rebellion, which afforded him an opportunity to better his fortunes and to prove the spirit in which he adopted the issues of the country for which he had abandoned the home of his birth.

He enlisted Dec. 20, 1861, in the 128th Ohio Vol. Inf., Co E, under Col. C. W. Hill.

The duty of the regiment was chiefly to guard the rebel officers taken prisoners of war and confined on Johnson's Island in Sandusky Bay.

He received an honorable discharge Jan. 17, 1865. He returned to Geauga County, where he continued to reside until the fall of 1868, the date of his coming to Michigan.

He secured a claim of 80 acres on section 36, where he established his homestead permanently.

The condition of things was primitive; there were no roads and the township of Burdell was for some time afterward unorganized.

He has made extensive improvements on his farm, and erected excellent buildings.

In political faith he is a Republican, and in religion the family are Catholics.

His children are all unmarried, and there has been no death in his family.

 

Charles D. Francisco, farmer, section 28, Hersey Township, was born Sept. 25, 1857, in Ontario Co., N. Y.

His parents, Henry D. and Charlotte (Chaffee) Francisco, are natives of the State of New York.

They came thence in 1861 and located in Grattan Township, Kent Co., Mich.

n 1868 they removed to the township of Bowne in the same county, whence, in 1876, they came to Hersey Township and located on section 33, where they are now resident.

(See sketch of H. D. Francisco.)

Mr. Francisco accompanied his parents in their several removals, and was 18 years old when they came to Osceola County.

He was married Sept. 23, 1882, to Alta Sturdevant, and they are now the parents of one child, Orra V., born Jan. 8, 1884.

The mother was born June 19, 1858, in Yates Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of Sheppard and Olivia (Cooper) Sturdevant.

Her parents are living in Reed City, and he father is estimated to be one of the best mechanics in Osceola County.

John, Francis and Alta are their three children.

Mr. Francisco belongs to the Republican element in politics.

 

Amos B. Perrin, Superintendent of the Graded Schools at Reed City, was born May 22, 1847, in Sherman Township, St. Joseph County, Michigan.

He is the fourth child of his parents, Andrew and Eliza (Burch) Perrin.

His father was born in Livingston Co., N. Y., and resides in Park Township, St. Joseph Co., Mich., in retirement, his youngest son being in charge of the management of the farm.

The mother of Amos B. was born April 6, 1822, in Niagara Co., N. Y., and died in St. Joseph Co., Mich., Sept. 18, 184-.

Five of their eight children are living.

Mr. Perrin was a pupil in the common schools and an assistant on his father's farm until he was 17 years of age, when he entered the preparatory department of Hillsdale College, where he was a student four years, teaching winters to secure means to defray his expenses.

He passed the school year of 1873-4 at the State Normal School at Ypsilanti, and on leaving that institution he went to Benzie Co., Mich., and took charge of the schools at Frankfort, as Superintendent, officiating in that capacity four years.

He passed the year following at Parkville, St. Joseph Co., Mich., and in 1878 entered upon his present incumbency.

The assistant teachers are seven in number, and the department individually controlled by Mr. Perrin contains 82 pupils.

The school is in a prosperous condition, and under the management of Mr. Perrin is advancing to a grade commensurate with the progress of Reed City.

The first class graduated at any school in Osceola County took their diplomas in June, 1883.

He is a member of the Patrons of Husbandry and of the Odd Fellows, and during the last two years has officiated as a member of the County Board of School Examiners.

He was married June 26, 1877, at Frankfort, Benzie Co., Mich., to Clara, daughter of Lucius and Betsey Marvin.

She was born Aug. 5, 1858, in Tuscola Co., Mich. Her father is a merchant.

 

William H. Hawkins, of the firm, of Hawkins Bros., grocers at Reed City and Ashton, was born in Ashtabula Co., Ohio,  September 15, 1849.

His parents, Joseph and Lucy (Hill) Hawkins, were natives respectively of New Hampshire and Ohio.

William H., the subject of this sketch, lived at home with his parents until 12 years of age, and then worked upon a farm for three years; next, he was apprenticed for two years to learn the mason's trade, and followed this occupation until 1882, where he formed a partnership with his brother, Harvey W., at Reed City, for the purpose of carrying on the grocery business.

In this line they succeeded well, and last spring (1884) they established a branch store at Ashton, where Mr. Hawkins, of this sketch, is in charge, and having a good trade.

In his political principles Mr. H. acts with the Prohibitionist party, and he is a member of the Masonic Order and of the A. O. U. W.

In Genesee Co., Mich., April 18, 1875, Mr. Hawkins married Miss Flora Graham, daughter of R. W. and Sarah J. (Warner) Graham.

She was born in Flint Township, that county, Sept. 20, 1855.

The children now in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins are three in number, namely: Lulu F., Daisy G. and Ralph W.

 

Nelson J. Tabor, farmer, section 4, Sherman Township, was born December 13, 1847, in Franklin County, New York.

He was educated in the common schools, and instructed in the duties of farm labor, in which he engaged independently at the age of 19, and on attaining his majority he came to Michigan and secured a homestead claim of 80 acres in Sherman Township.

He devoted himself without delay to its reclamation from a state of nature, and settled permanently, becoming a resident thereon in 1869.

He has accomplished a good degree of successful effort and has 50 acres under cultivation and supplied with all necessary farm buildings and fixtures.

Mr. Tabor is a Democrat.

He was married March 23, 1883, in Cadillac, to Fanny Barton, and they are the parents of two children—Ernest and Orion W. Mrs. Tabor was born July 20, 1854, in Big Prairie Township, Newaygo County, and is the daughter of William and Dorothy (French) Barton, natives respectively of the North of Ireland and of France.

She is niece of Judge James Barton, whose abilities, position and public services in Newaygo County have acquired for him a fame which will live as long as the county has an organic existence.

Mrs. Tabor has been educated with care, and when she was 20 years of age she entered the State Normal School at Ypsilanti, where she completed a course of study and was graduated.

She has been a successful and popular teacher.

 

Christian J. Fleischhauer, grocery and provision merchant at Reed City, was born June 6, 1842, at Waterloo, Ont.

His parents, John and Mary (Youngblut) Fleischhauer, are natives of Germany and are still living at Gad's Hill, Ont., where the father is enjoying a retired life.

Previous to the age of 17 years he was reared on a farm, and in 1859 he commenced his career in mercantile life as a salesman in a general store.

Later, he established himself in the same business in company with Joseph Schaeffer in Waterloo.

Two years after, his partner purchased his interest, and he operated as a clerk in the employment of B. Devitt as book-keeper and salesman for some time.

In 1870 he became book-keeper in L. Breithaupt's leather and shoe finding house at Berlin, Ont., where he was employed about two years, when he engaged as a traveling salesman for the same house, operating in that capacity more than five years.

In July, 1877, he moved from Berlin, Ont., to Reed City, Mich., and founded his business at Reed City in the same month. In the fall of 1882 he took possession of his present quarters in the Opera Block.

His stock is valued at $3,000, and comprises a well-selected assortment of groceries and provisions, crockery and glassware, and his business also includes a jobbing trade in kerosene oil.

He requires the aid of three assistants.

He is the owner of his residence; four lots therewith, a dwelling and lot in another part of the city, a business building opposite his stand and three lots variously situated in the city.

He was married Oct. 18, 1864, in New Hamburg, Ont., to Elizabeth Gingrich.

Their children were born as follows: William G., Aug. 20, 1865; Alfred M., March 31, 1867, at Waterloo, Ont.; Mary A., at Berlin, Dec. 28, 1870; Arthur E., at Berlin, June 27, 1874 (died Oct. 15, 1880), at Reed City; David S., at Berlin, Ont., Jan. 27, 1877.

Mrs. Fleischhauer was born in Wilmot Township, Waterloo Co., Ont., and is the oldest daughter of Michael and Mary Gingrich, and have both died since she was married.

 

Samuel J. Lyon, farmer, section 2, Sherman Township, was born June 24, 1849, in Madison Co., N. Y.

He was subject to the parental control until he was 21 years of age and acquired a common-school education.

On attaining his majority he engaged in farm labor as opportunity served, in which avenue he was occupied until his marriage, April 10, 1872, at Utica, Oneida Co., N. Y., to Delia J. Cooper.

They have two children—Lena M., born Dec. 12, 1874, and Frank S., Dec. 2, 1880.

Mrs. Lyon was born Jan. 26, 1851, in Madison Co., N. Y.

Her parents, Isaac and Mary Miller, were born in the same county and belonged to the farming community.

Her father died in 1873 in the Empire State.

The mother is 60 years of age, and is a resident of Sherman Township.

Immediately after his marriage he was tendered and accepted the supervisorship of the agricultural laborers on the farm owned by the famous Oneida Community, and officiated in that capacity between two and three years, but sustaining no other relation to the order than that of one who had skilled labor to sell, - a commodity the society had occasion to purchase.

Leaving his position at Oneida, he set out westward with his family and commenced lumbering in the woods of Chippewa Co., Wis.

He was occupied there in that field of effort until his removal to Osceola County in the spring of 1876.

He purchased immediately 51 acres of land, where he established his homestead.

Later, he added by purchase a similar acreage and at present (1884) the two farms have a combined amount of land under cultivation aggregating 65 acres, which has been brought up to the quality of farming common to the section where it is located.

He is a Democrat in political faith and action.

He is present Justice of the Peace, and has held other positions of minor importance.

 

Erastus A. Carroll, proprietor of the National Hotel at Reed City, was born Sept. 26, 1832, in Utica, N. Y., and is the son of Chauncey and Harriet (Gibbs) Carroll.

His father was a farmer and a cooper, and reared his family on a farm in the Empire State.

His first business enterprise was as a farmer, and he afterwards combined with his agricultural relations the operations of a stock dealer.

He began butchering afterward, and pursued that business eight years in East Bloomfield. He passed three years afterward in the hotel business.

In March, 1884, Mr. Carroll came to Bay City, Mich., to prospect.

In April following he came to Reed City and rented the National Hotel for five years.

It is one of the principal hotels in Reed City, and has accommodations for 75 guests, and is fitted with the necessary accompaniments suited to the demands of the traveling public.

Mr. Carroll is a member of the A. O. U. W. and of the order known as the Select Knights.

His marriage to Charlotte Barnes took place Oct. 20, 1857, in Farmington, N. Y.

She was born Nov. 25, 1831, in that place, and is the daughter of Stephen and Rachel Barnes. Stephen B. Carroll was born Feb. 18, 1860, and is a farmer in East Bloomfield, Ontario Co., N. Y., on a fine farm of 155 acres.

Gertrude A. Carroll was born April 5, 1863.

There are two children from the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Carroll.

 

Clarence H. White, M. D., practicing physician and surgeon at Reed City, was born June 12, 1848, in Erie Co., Pa.

When he was 12 years old his parents, Welcome W. and Abbie (Hoard) White, removed from the Keystone State to Chenango Co., N. Y.

On the paternal side of his descent he is of mixed English and Irish origin.

On his mother's side he descended from Henry Hoard, who went with his family in 1800 from Connecticut to the Holland Purchase in Western New York.

He was a soldier of the Revolution and fought at its initiatory battle at Lexington, where he carried an old "Queen's Arm," a munition of war immortalized in the “Biglow Papers," and undoubtedly a facsimile of the one that "Granther Young brought back from Concord busted."

It is a Queen Ann musket, and was issued by the English Government to the Indians in Canada to fight the French in their war with that people in 1754.

The son of Henry Hoard, also named Henry, the maternal grandsire of Dr. White, enlisted in the service of the United States when the British made the attack on Buffalo, in 1812, and presented himself for duty armed with the musket that did service in the war of the Revolution.

The weapon that bore a part in three wars is now in the possession of Dr. White.

On the removal of his parents to Chenango County, he became a student at the old Sherburne Academy and was graduated in 1867.

On leaving school he began the study of homeopathy in the office of J. C. Owen.

He came thence to St. John's, Clinton Co., Mich., two years later, and began to read for his profession with his uncle, Oliver C. Joslin, remaining under his instructions until 1871.

He attended one course of lectures in the Medical Department of the University at Buffalo, and subsequently completed his studies at the Medical College at Fort Wayne, Ind.

In 1871 he came to Paris, Mecosta County, by then the terminus of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, where he began his practice and also engaged in the sale of drugs.

He removed in 1877 to Hersey, and he continued his practice two years, sold his business and came to Reed City in the fall of 1878.

Associated with his father, he erected the building in which he has since transacted his business.

Dr. White is a member of the Order of Odd Fellows and of the Masonic fraternity. He has served the county four years as Coroner, and has been Mayor of Reed City one year.

He is the United States Pension Examining Surgeon, and in 1883, when the Board of Examining Surgeons was instituted; he was made its President, and still occupies the position.

He is a member of the Northern Michigan Medical Society and the Surgeon of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Corporation.

He was married July 1, 1877, to Anna M. Hardy.

They have one child, Floyd G., born March 12, 1879, at Hersey.

Mrs. White was born in 1856, at Cooperstown, N. Y., and is the daughter of William and Maria Hardy.

 

Joseph Shank, farmer, Sherman Township, resident on section 14, was born Jan. 26, 1821, in Portage Co., Ohio.

His father was a native of New York, lived most of his life in Virginia, and died in 1842, in Portage Co., Ohio.

His mother, Mary (Cliff) Shank, was born in Virginia, and died in May, 1870, in Allegan Co, Mich.

Mr. Shank remained under the paternal care through his minority and attended school most of the time until he was 22.

After arriving at that age he was occupied as a farm laborer by the agriculturists in the vicinity where he was reared, and operated in that capacity until his marriage, in March, 1848, to Sarah Crow.

Nine children have been born to them, two of whom are deceased,—Joseph L. and Samuel B.

Those who survive are Martha M., Alonzo M., John W., William, Nicholas B., Mary A. and Albert M.

The mother was born July 31, 1827, in Portage Co., Ohio, and is the daughter of Samuel and Martha (McCullough) Crow.

Her father was born in Virginia and died in Ohio.

Her mother lives with her children in Osceola County.

She is 84 years of age and was born in Pennsylvania.

Mr. Shank was for some time after his marriage a farmer of Portage County.

He came thence in 185 1 to Allegan Co., Mich., where he was a resident a number of years, and while there exchanged his farm for another in the same county.

In 1867 he secured a homestead claim of 80 acres in Sherman Township.

Three families only preceded their settlement in this part of Osceola County, and the nearest market for necessary supplies was Big Rapids.

Mr. Shank has improved 40 acres of his farm.

He was active in establishing the municipal regulations of the township, of which he was elected second Supervisor.

He has been Highway Commissioner and held minor official positions.

He is a Democrat in political views, and is regarded as an upright and reliable citizen.

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as is also his wife.

 

Wellington J. Law, M. D., practicing physician and surgeon at Le Roy, was born July 29, 1850, in York Co., Ontario.

Dr. Law is a descendant from ancestors of Scotch and English extraction, his immediate progenitors being of American origin.

The race is remarkable for tenacity of life, particularly in the maternal line of descent.

His parents, and Elizabeth (Klinck) Law, are living in retirement near Toronto, and are aged respectively 77 and 70 years.

His maternal grandmother is yet living, at Peoria, Ill., and is 105 years old!

Dr. Law obtained a good fundamental education in the Dominion of Canada, and on attaining his majority, he matriculated at the Detroit Medical College, where he completed a full medical course, and was graduated in 1881.

On receiving his credentials as a physician he established his business at Le Roy.

His earnestness in his profession, his integrity and conscientious fidelity to the important trusts confided to his skill and judgment, have won for him a merited popularity, and he is steadily advancing to prominence as a medical practitioner.

He is a Republican in political proclivity, and has officiated as Health Officer of the village and Township of Le Roy.

He is the owner of four village lots.

Dr. Law was married July 29, 1884, at Manistee, Michigan to Miss E. Norine La Croix.

She was born in the State of Illinois, January 26, 1862, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

Henry D. Francisco, farmer, section 33, Hersey Township, was born Dec. 10, 1832, in Ontario Co., N. Y.

His father, John H. Francisco, was born in Ontario County, in 1797.

His ancestors were Spaniards and the descendants in the United States had their origin in one individual who came here 50 years, or thereabouts, previous to the War of the Revolution, married among the Hollanders of the Mohawk Valley in the State of New York, and became the father of seven sons of stalwart stature.

One son, six and a half feet in height, became a soldier of the Revolutionary War and was in action at the battle of Stillwater, near where his family had settled.

John H. married Nancy Kinsman, who was born in Bennington Co., Vt., in 1807.

She was of mixed Welsh and New England lineage.

Two of the brothers of Henry D. lost their lives while in the military service of the United States - one being killed in the battle of Winchester; the other died in the hospital from sun-stroke.

Mr. Francisco was a resident of Ontario County during his minority.

He taught school winters, working meanwhile as a carpenter during the intervening seasons.

In December, 1861, he came to Grand Rapids, where he purchased land and resided 14 years.

In the spring of 1876 he removed to an improved farm in Hersey Township, which comprised 60 acres. He has cleared and otherwise improved 45 acres.

He is a Republican in political sentiment, and while resident in Kent County was Justice of the Peace, a position to which he was elected in Osceola County and in which he has served altogether 18 years.

He acted as Supervisor in 1878.

Mr. Francisco was married July 23, 1854, to Charlotte Chaffee, and they have been the parents of six children: Charles I), was born Dec. 25,1857; Kate C, Sept. 23, 1864; Orville Grant, Nov. 5, 1868; Jennie M., March 25, 1870; Frank C., Jan. 25,1875; one is deceased.

The mother was born Dec. 29, 1837, in Yates Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of Ephraim and Jane (Blair) Chaffee.

Both died in Middlesex, Yates Co., N. Y.

They were natives of New York, and their ancestors were French Huguenots, who settled in Massachusetts.

 

Edward H. Woods, book-keeper for Kellogg, Seymour & Co., at Sawyerville, was born in New Baltimore, Stark Co., Ohio, March 31, 1858.

In his early life he attended the common schools and also Mount Union College in his native county; but the greater portion of his life, prior to his coming to Osceola County, was spent in Portage Co., Ohio.

On his arrival in this county in the spring of 1879, he engaged in teaching for a short time; then for two years he was engaged as book-keeper for James E. Bevins, and since that time for the firm of Kellogg, Seymour & Co.

Under the old school law Mr. Woods has served as Township Superintendent of Schools, and under the new law as member of the County Board of School Examiners, being Secretary of the Board during the last year of his term.

In his views of national policy he is a stalwart Republican.

In Reed City, May 13, 1880, Mr. Woods was married to Miss Mary I. Tomlinson, who was born in Portage Co., Ohio, Oct. 1, 1859, and they have had three children, namely: Nellie, Berenice B. and Rae Dean.

The first mentioned died at the age of 14 months.

Mr. Woods' father, Hiram F., was a native of Ohio, and his mother, Lydia H., nee McBride, was a native of Pennsylvania.

After their marriage they settled in Pennsylvania, and afterward removed to Stark Co., Ohio, thence to Portage County, where Mr. W., senior, died, July 30, 1881.

Mrs. W. afterward, in the summer of 1881, came to this county, and finally departed this life at Le Roy, Feb. 1, 1882.

They had seven sons and seven daughters, in which family Edward H., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest son.

Anthony M. Sample

Anthony M. Sample, farmer, section 14, Hersey Township, is the proprietor of 120 acres of land, including 80 acres cleared improved and in fine agricultural condition.

He was born March 6, 1810, in Beaver Dams, Schuyler Co., N. Y., and is the son of David and Margaret (Latta) Sample.

They removed to the Dominion of Canada in 1822, and died near Belleville, the father's decease occurring about 1842; that of the mother took place about 1854.

At the age of 18 years the father of Mr. Sample placed him to learn the business of a carpenter, which he pursued, as opportunity served, about 15 years.

He remained a resident of Canada until 1865, the year of his removal to Hersey.

On coming here he bought 80 acres of land, to which he has added materially by later purchase until he owns his present fine estate, and has given each of his six sons land enough to make a start in the world for himself.

He was married Jan 8, 1831, to Mary A. Potts.

She was born April 3, 1816, in County Fermanagh, Ireland, and died Nov. 3, 1851, leaving 10 children, born as follows: Eliza E., April 12, 1834; Juliana, Feb. 5, 1836; John G. W., June 19, 1838; Sally, April 19, 1840; Nancy E., Aug. 2, 1842; Henrietta, Aug. 22, 1844; Prince A., July 14, 1846; George M., May 26, 1848; Anthony W. and Mary A. (twins) June 13, 1851.

The mother was the daughter of Thomas and Sally Potts.

Mr. Sample was a second time married Jan. 12, 1853, to Lettie A. Lucas, who was born in 1825, and died June 23, 1874, leaving two children, — Daniel W., born in August, 1854, and Chauncy M. born in September, 1855.

The third marriage of Mr. Sample, to Susan Lucas, occurred Aug. 23, 1874.

She is a sister of the second wife, and was born Dec. 22, 1838, in Canada.

Their parents, Daniel and Catherine (Goslin) Lucas, were natives of Canada.

The father died in July, 1878, and was 80 years of age at the time of his decease.

The mother was born Jan 14, 1804, and resides in Canada.

Four children have been born of the third marriage: Lettie A., April 9, 1875; Margaret C, Sept. 6, 1877; Elijah, June 28, 1879; Lovicy J., Jan. 1, 1881.

Mr. Sample is independent in political principle, and has taken much interest in school matters.

His portrait, on another page, is that of a representative farmer of Osceola County.

 

Laban J. Lemert, miller and farmer on section 27, Osceola Township, was born Oct. 6, 1823, in Cohocton Co., Ohio.

Lewis Lemert, his father, was born Aug. 5, 1802, in London Co., Va., of Holland Dutch parentage, and was taken to Ohio when he was five years old, residing there until 1828.

In that year he went to Crawford County, in the same State, where he died, Aug. 5, 1882, being 80 years old.

The mother, Ruth (Purdus) Lemert, was born in Bedford Co., Pa., of French ancestry, and went to Ohio about 1808 with her father's family.

She died May 12, 1880.

Of their family of nine children, six attained adult age, and there are four survivors at this writing (1884).

Joshua is a merchant at Nelsonville, Ohio. Eliza—Mrs. Rouse—is a widow and resides at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. Wilson C. is a prominent business man living at Bucyrus, Ohio.

He has been interested in the construction of the Nickel Plate Railroad in Kansas, and is the owner of 1,200 acres of land in Iowa.

Mr. Lemert, of this sketch, is the oldest born of the family.

He grew to manhood on his father's farm, and acquired a very thorough and practical knowledge of agricultural pursuits.

At 21 he devoted his time and attention to the acquisition of an education and attended the university at Delaware, Ohio.

His first employment afterward was as a clerk and book-keeper in a mercantile establishment at Matherton, Ionia Co., Mich.

Soon afterward he became owner of the stock and business relations by purchase, and he continued the management of the business there 13 years, operating after the first two years as Postmaster also.

He disposed of his affairs at Matherton Oct. 9, 187 1, and proceeded to Osceola County.

He arrived at the latter date at Evart, and 15 days later received the appointment of Deputy Sheriff.

He held the position until April, 1872, when he was elected Supervisor of the township and Justice of the Peace, and also received the appointment of Postmaster at Evart.

He was the chief instrument in securing the establishment of the office at that point.

In the fall of 1873 he built a grist-mill near the village site on Chippewa Creek.

He began its practical operation in December, 1874, which he has since prosecuted.

He is the owner of 84 acres of land adjacent to the mill, on which he has made great improvements.

He is a Republican of most decided proclivities.

Mr. Lemert was married Dec. 30, 1849, in Wyandot Co., Ohio, to Phebe Bentley.

Mrs. Lemert is the daughter of Andrew and Eliza (Brownell) Bentley.

Her parents, were both natives of New York, and came to Ohio in 1S38, settling in Wyandot County, whence they removed in 1854 to Ionia Co., Mich.

Her father died there in the spring of 1860.

The mother died Feb. 13, 1855, in the same county.

Mr. and Mrs. Lemert have a daughter, Alta, now Mrs. Samuel E Clay, and resides at Williamstown, Ingham Co., Mich.

 

Charles Johnson, farmer, section 27, Le Roy Township, was born October 18, 1837, in Sweden, and accompanied by a younger brother, he came to the United States.

They obtained employment in different location until 1868, when they came to Osceola County and located 160 acres of land, on which they have lived and operated together sharing mutually the benefits accruing.

Mr. Johnson was married August 17, 1884, to Ida Petersen.

She was born in Sweden and came to Michigan from the land of her birth in June, 1883.

Her parents are living in their native country.

Politically Mr. Johnson is a Republican.

He is a member of the Lutheran Church, as is also his wife.

 

Byron G. Colton, member of the business 3 house of Charles L. Gray & Co., merchants, manufacturers and dealers in lumber, shingles, etc., at Evart, was born Aug. 17, 1856, in Genesee Township and County, Mich.

His parents, Elon and Harriet (Begle) Colton, are natives of the State of New York, where the former was born July 9, 1822, the latter, March 6, 1829.

The families of which they were members came to Macomb Co., Mich., when they were young.

After their marriage they settled in Genesee County, where they are still resident.

Seven of their ten children are yet living.

Mr. Colton is the sixth child in order of birth, and was reared on his father's farm during his childhood and early youth.

He abandoned agricultural pursuits when 17 years of age and learned telegraphy, which he pursued as an occupation seven years.

He came to Evart in the spring of 1879 and officiated as telegraph operator in the office of the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad Company.

Two years later—in 1881—he opened a store where he is now doing business, and after six months he admitted George V. Seeley to a partnership.

A year afterward the latter sold his interest to the original owner, and not long after Charles L. Gray purchased the interest he has since held, and consolidated his extensive lumbering relations with the mercantile connections.

On Jan. 1, 1884, William Latta was admitted to an interest in the business, the firm style becoming Charles L. Gray & Co., and the relations of the house are steadily expanding and increasing.

One mill is situated on River Street at the foot of Sixth, where 15 men are required as assistants in the manufacture of lumber and broom-handles.

At another mill, located in Hartwick Township, they employ 15 men, and manufacture shingles and four foot clap-boards.

A third mill, at Sunrise Lake, requires a complement of 20 assistants and is devoted to the manufacture of shingles and other lumber products.

Their stock of merchandise represents from $8,000 to $10,000 in value, and includes dry goods, groceries, and all articles suited to their trade.

The mill site at Evart occupies several acres, and the company owns two large warehouses near the depot for storage purposes.

Mr. Colton is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

His marriage to Nettie Tupper occurred at Grand Blanc, Genesee Co., Mich., April 15, 1877, and they are the parents of one child, Etta May, born in Evart, April 12, 1882.

Mrs. Colton was born at Grand Blanc, Nov. 12, 1855, and is the daughter of Benajah and Charlotte Tupper.

 

Arthur Sunderlin, resident at Reed City, was born February 11, 1853, in Potter Co., Pa.

His father, Cyrus Sunderlin, was born Jan. 8, 1814, at Wayne Junction, Steuben Co., N. Y.

The latter passed his early life as a farmer, and later became a merchant.

In 1876 he came to Reed City and leased the Evergreen House, which he managed some time, and afterwards assumed charge of the St. Elmo House, in which he died, March 3, 1884.

The mother, Sarah M. (Barnes) Sunderlin, was born Feb. 11, 1822, in Troy, Bradford Co., Pa., and is now a resident of Reed City.

Their six children lived to mature age; but Mr. Sunderlin, of this sketch, is the only survivor.

He was brought up as a farmer's son, attending school winters until the age of 18 years, when he became a teacher and taught two terms of winter school.

He studied during three terms in the Woodhull Academy in Steuben County, and, when 20, entered the State Normal School at Edinboro, Pa., where he pursued a defined course of study and was graduated in the spring of 1875.

He went to Oberlin, Ohio, and passed a few months as a student at the famous college there, after which he again engaged in teaching in his native State, where he was occupied in that profession two years.

In 1877 he came to Reed City and officiated as Principal of the schools two years, entering meanwhile upon the study of law, in which he is still engaged.

In 1879-80, he discharged the duties of Superintendent of Schools of Richmond Township, and in the spring of 1880 was elected President of Reed City.

At the Senatorial Convention of the Prohibition Party, held at Reed City, Sept. 16, 1884, he was placed in nomination for the incumbency.

Mr. Sunderlin was married Dec. 27, 1877, at Home Wood, Beaver Co., Pa., to E. Jennie Coffin, and they have two children, - Louis K., born Oct. 2, 1880, and one born Dec. 1, 1883.

Mrs. Sunderlin is the daughter of John D. Coffin.

 

Oliver Clark, farmer, section 30, Middle Branch Township, was born Aug. 28, 1848, in Tiffin, Seneca Co., Ohio.

His parents, Thomas and Mary Clark, are natives of the Buckeye State and removed from Seneca County to Hardin County in the same State in 1851.

They have been farmers all their lives and have reached advanced age.

Mr. Clark was three years old when his parents located in Hardin County.

He obtained his education in the common schools, and worked on his father's farm until he was 17 years of age.

His first independent action was his enrollment in the military service of the United States.

He enlisted Aug. 23, 1864, in the 180th Ohio Vol. Inf., Co. A, Captain Howell, the regiment being commanded by Colonel Warner.

After six months he was seized with illness, and was assigned to the hospital at Newbern, N. C.

A month later he was transferred to the hospital on David's Island, New York Harbor, where he was discharged in June, 1865.

After his return to Ohio he remained a year with his parents, and afterwards was occupied at various points as a farm laborer, until he was married.

In 1867, the year following that event, he made a homestead claim in Middle Branch Township, securing 140 acres of land.

At that date this section of Osceola County was wholly unsettled; not a road had been built nor a tree cut.

He had hardly settled in his new home when his house and its contents were burned.

He again erected a log house, and with his wife and child managed to obtain the barest livelihood.

There was no work to be had.

Swamp hay was $40 per ton, and could not be afforded even for a bed, and they slept on hemlock boughs.

The famous salt famine of Northern Michigan occurred at this time, and the family was destitute of that sanitary article for seven weeks.

Many other necessities were equally scarce, and their only food for nearly a year was potatoes, eaten from a borrowed tin plate!

A barrel of salt, the first brought in, by a man named David Shadley, was sold in the vicinity for $18.

The wife worked during the winter of 1868, and earned the money to buy their first cow.

Mr. Clark is still the owner of the first purchase of land he made in the township, and of 160 acres additional.

He has 150 acres under excellent improvements and supplied with good and necessary farm buildings.

He is a Republican of fixed and earnest principles, has been Township Clerk two years, and has held various other official positions.

He was first married Sept. 24, 1867, in Hardin Co., Ohio, to Lydia E. Connor.

She was born in the same county and there grew to womanhood.

She died in the Hospital for the Insane at Kalamazoo, Mich., leaving three children, - John W., Thosia B. and Byron L.

Mr. Clark was again married Oct. 23, 1877, in Middle Branch Township, to Agnes Mitchell.

She was born July 3, 1858, in Bruce Co., Ont., and is the daughter of Joseph and Mary A. (Kingshott) Mitchell.

Her parents were born respectively in England and Ontario, and are both of English parentage.

They reside on section 4, Middle Branch Township. ,

 

Thomas P. Pierson, farmer, section 29, Hersey Township, was born December 11, 1856, in Pierson Township, Montcalm County, Michigan.

His father, George M. Pierson, was born in Naples, Ontario County, New York, has been a carpenter most of his life and is also a farmer.

The parents yet reside in Pierson.

Mr. Pierson remained under the guidance of his father until he was of age, when he obtained employment in a shingle-mill, continuing in that occupation six years in various parts of the State.

In 1883 he took possession of the farm which has since been his field of operation.

About five acres were under improvement at the time of his purchase, and he has cleared 17 acres, built a frame house, and by his vigorous industry is fast putting his affairs into prosperous condition. He is a Democrat in political views and relations.

He was married May 6, 1883, to Martha Jacobus, who was born Feb. 22, 1862.

She has two brothers and two sisters and a half-brother—Frank E., George E., Elizabeth, Minnie E. and Warren.

Her father, Edward Jacobus, resides at Vistula, Ind., where her mother, Christina (Daun) Jacobus, died, July 26, 1871.

 

William J. McIlwain, farmer, located on U section 26, Evart Township, was born 'p May 12, 1849, in Newtown-Hamilton, County Armagh, Ireland.

His father, Isaac McIlwain, was a native of the same county and married Margaret Scott.

She died April 12, 1862, and was about 50 years of age when her decease occurred.

The senior McIlwain is still a resident of the Green Isle, and is 62 years old.

Mr. McIlwain, of this sketch, landed at the port of New York, May 21, 1873.

After a delay of one week, he came to Evart, where he arrived May 28.

His first employment was as a clerk in the store of Mark Ardis.

He afterwards formed a partnership with his employer, which continued two years.

After their dissolution he resumed his former relation as salesman, in which he still continues.

In 1877 he bought his farm, with only five acres under culture.

The place is now in fine .condition, with 70 acres under the plow and with excellent farm buildings of all varieties necessary to a high order of agriculture.

He was married Sept. 19, 1876, to Ida M. Wightman.

They have had five children: Mary M. was born July 4, 1877; George J., July 3, 1878; Maggie E., July 19, 1882 ; William Joseph, June 5, 1883, and Allie Louise, June 23, 1884.

One child is deceased. Mrs. McIlwain is the daughter of George R. and Mary (Crandall) Wightman, who were born in Homer, Cortland Co., N. Y.

Her father was born Oct. 18, 1808.

He is a physician by profession, and is now resident at Wayland, Allegan Co., Mich.

Her mother was born Aug. 31, 1815, and died June 17, 1883, in Evart.

They had 12 children.

Mrs. McIlwain was born Sept. 22, 1855, in Galesburg, Kalamazoo Co., Mich.

The brothers and sisters of Mr. McIlwain are George, James, John, Mary, Jane and Samuel.

 

Francis D. Lacy, of Nirvana, Lake Co., Mich., was born in Western New York on the 5th day of May, 1838.

He is the youngest son of Eli Lacy, who raised up a family of six boys and four girls.

His father moved to this State in the year 1840, and settled in the wilds of Oakland County upon 120 acres of land, marsh and lake, about one-third of which was upland of an inferior quality, and the remainder entirely worthless. »

Eli Lacy was a man of respectability and fair intelligence, but his financial abilities were lacking, and had it not been for the wonderful qualities of his wife, her good physical health and untiring ambition, it is hard to say what would have been the result in raising up a family of ten children, and in what condition they would have been launched out upon the world.

As it was, the family passed through many privations and was forced to exercise a frugality which has scarcely a parallel on record.

Thousands have passed through a more degraded poverty, but the cases where a family of such high order of intelligence has been forced to so low a condition of destitution, are certainly uncommon.

Imagine what a burden of anxiety must have rested upon the inadequate abilities of parents, struggling to their utmost to furnish food and raiment and educate so large a family, and at the same time somebody standing ready to snatch the last dollar at hand to Day the interest on an old calloused mortgage which held a death grip upon the freedom of the household!

Children attending school in cold winter weather, wearing blue drilling trousers without lining or drawers, and otherwise lightly clad, and suffering with the cold as the children of this family were often compelled to, have learned to demonstration what "hard times " mean.

An older brother, now a wealthy citizen residing in Reed City, went bare-foot the winter through, and did chores in the barn, and often slid down hill as a pastime; and in relating the fact, remarks that it was not so much a matter of romance as of stern reality.

This brother, V. E. Lacy, always bore his privations with fortitude, and labored for the comforts of others, denying himself; being half way from the oldest to the youngest, he was last to be provided for; and yet he doubtless did more for the comforts of home than all the others together; and even since leaving home for himself, he has rendered much for the comforts of parents and sisters, as also has Francis, of whom we are narrating.

These blessings have doubtless been showered back upon both of them, as they are both well situated in life, with happy families around them.

In those boyhood years, it required but little to constitute a ^ luxury.

A toy like a penny jewsharp, a slate pencil or goose-quill pen, or stick of candy, were all worthy of remark, and well relished by children of such poverty.

A new garment made by that industrious mother, or a new pair of shoes, would make the lucky wearer the center of attraction for a time, and let those only who have experienced the situation judge how "good" the red leather “looked."

Francis was mentally bright and physically active.

He became a good scholar, and at the age of 16 engaged as a teacher.

This vocation he followed for several years, "until," as he expressed it, "he became unfit for anything else, and a few more terms would make him totally unfit for that!"

At intervals, during the years of his teaching, he learned the printer's trade and, having a taste for literature, indulged in writing considerable for the press, and acted at times in the capacity of editor.

Having quite a fondness for poetry, he wrote occasional pieces, and in the year 1860, published his first pamphlet, entitled "Leisure Hours."

In 1862 he published "The Ray of Light," and in 1863 a treatise on mental philosophy, to be used as a phrenological chart in giving delineations of character.

Engaging in this profession, he followed lecturing for a time, but having an opportunity of studying more carefully the anatomy of the human brain, and the nature of its convolutions, he rather concluded that the old theory of phrenology as advocated by Fowler & Wells was somewhat a farce, and therefore dropped the subject to engage in the study of legerdemain.

In this he soon became proficient, and, being without money to start with, constructed his own apparatus, and bought on credit a horse, buggy and harness.

He now boldly struck out in his new profession, and, meeting with good success, soon paid for these, and contracted for 80 acres of land, costing $1,400, near Laingsburg in this State.

Wearying of this business, after following it for about three years, he engaged as a partner with his brother, V. E. Lacy, near Lapeer, this State, in the manufacture of shingles.

This business prospered, the same as anything else that V. E. ever took hold of, and at the end of three years they dissolved partnership, each buying a mill for himself; and in the year 1874 Francis shipped his mill and household goods to Nirvana and established himself there for making shingles, and also engaged in merchandise, where he will be found comfortably situated at the present time.

Since he has been at Nirvana he has suffered some severe losses.

His mill was burned, and at the time when the loss fell most heavily upon him, and in other ways has had numerous financial set-backs; yet he has passed through them with scarcely a riffle to disturb his good humor; and, being surrounded by a beautiful wife and four sparkling eyed children, he has but little to regret.

He still continues to ply the pen, and within the last two years has published two works, - "Nature's Harmony," a philosophical treatise, and "Star Lake Romance,'" a poetical story—both of which do credit to the author.

And thus we have narrated the history of one who commenced in the lowest degree of poverty, and has arisen to a fair height in both fame and fortune.

When he had made some progress in the accumulation of property, and was standing well in society, he thought favorably of taking a wife.

Some there were of the gay and fashionable circles, and some who were wealthy, among the ladies, whom he flattered himself that he could win; but being interested with a beautiful child 13 years old, Eunice A. Stevens, the daughter of William and Delilah Stevens, who lived far back in the lowest of poverty, he took pleasure in providing her with nice clothing and furnishing her with books for intellectual culture.

She bore the appellation of “The Rustic Angel " and "Lacy's Gypsy Princess" until 1872, at which time she had reached her 14th year; and on the 8th day of November, of that year, in the presence of a pleasant circle of friends at Lapeer, Mich., he married her.

She was arrayed like a princess on the occasion, much to the admiration of those present, but greatly to the contempt of many who envied her.

Eunice A., nee Stevens, the wife of Francis D. Lacy, was born on the 28th day of October, 1858.

On the 19th day of August, 1874, she gave birth to her first child.

Lately before this ordeal, they moved from near Lapeer to Nirvana, and it is thought her fatigue proved fatal to the child: it lived but 12 hours.

His name was entered upon the family register as Herbert Emmanuel.

Arthur Jay, the second son, was born Sept. 30, 1876; Rollo Guy was born Jan. 27, 1879; Plato Ray, April 17, 1881; and Florence May, March 17, 1884.

 

William Lambert, woolen manufacturer at Reed City, was born Nov. 23, 1837, at Cavan, Ontario, and is the son of Richard and Elizabeth (Amos) Lambert.

His father was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1808, and his mother in Dalkeith, Scotland, in 1818.

They moved to Ontario in 1832, settling in Cavan, and are now living in Ailsa Craig, in the Dominion, to which point they moved in 1859.

Mr. Lambert left the parental home in 1856, going to the township of London, where he resided most of the time until his removal to Reed City, arriving June 2, 1883.

Here he purchased a building a mile and a quarter from the city for the purpose of converting it into a woolen mill; but, finding that a poor investment after a nine months' trial, he purchased the building he now occupies in Reed City, where he is setting out in good earnest in his chosen business

He was married Oct. 9, 1858, in the city of London, Ont., to Miss Ann Waugh, the daughter of Robert and Margaret (Robson) Waugh, the former a native of Scotland and the latter of the North of England. Mrs. L. was born in Lobo Township, Ontario. May 13, 1841.

To Mr. and Mrs. Lambert have been born six children, as follows: Robert A., Sept. 9, 1859, in the 15th concession, Land Township, Ont.; Margaret, Jan. 3, 1861, at the same place: Isabella, j June 1, 1863, at Varna, Ont.; William A., May 11, £ 1865, in Carlisle, Ont.; Elizabeth M., July 24, 1867, in London Township, Ont.; and Richard A., Nov 28, 1868, in the same township.

 

Charles Carmell, farmer, section 3, Sylvan Township, was born Dec. 31, 1836, in Marine City, St. Clair Co., Mich.

His father, Moses Carmell, was born in the Dominion of Canada, and descended from French ancestors.

He was a carpenter and joiner, and pursued his vocation at Marine City until his death in 1867.

Julia (Cushway) Carmell, his mother, was born, married, and passed the entire course of her life at Marine City.

She was of French descent, and died about 1848, leaving seven children.

Two of her children's deaths preceded hers.

Mr. Carmell remained in the protecting care of his father until about 17 years old.

At that age he became a saw-mill assistant in the lumber mills of his native county and acquired superior skill in the position of sawyer.

He pursued that business during the winter seasons and through the summers of several years he was a sailor on the lakes, operating at first as a common seaman, and later as first mate.

In 1856 he went to Saginaw City, where he was a sawyer in the extensive lumber mills for some years.

Meanwhile he purchased a home in South Saginaw and resided there until 1872, working at his trade, and as foreman for a boom company.

He went thence to Lowell, Kent County, where he remained ti months, going from that place to Evart, Osceola County.

In the spring of 1877 ne Purchased 40 acres in Sylvan Township, all in timber and situated on the line of the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad, where he established a permanent home, went vigorously to work to reclaim his land from its wild state, and he now has 20 acres under cultivation, with comfortable buildings.

Mr. Carmell was married April 24, 1859, in East Saginaw, to Mary A. McNally.

She was born Aug. 26, 1838, in County Down, Ireland.

Her parents, Thomas and Mary A. (Forley) McNally, came from Ireland to America in 1852, and located primarily in Albany Co., N. Y., where the entire household was employed in the cotton factories situated at Cohoes.

After a stay there of four years, they came to Michigan and settled in the forest on the Flint River, 16 miles from East Saginaw, and at so early a period that it was still an unbroken wilderness and inhabited by Indians.

Later, the daughter went to East Saginaw, where she was soon after married.

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Carmell: Lizzie (Mrs. Birdsall), Josephine and Willie; the latter died in infancy.

 

Luther T. Elmore, farmer, section 32, Sylvan Township, was born April 5, 1840, in Ontario Co., N. Y.

His father was a tailor by profession and reared his family on a farm.

The son, who is the subject of this sketch, was under his father's care until the period of his majority, when he entered the Union Army, the Civil War having broken out just after he arrived at his 21st birthday.

He enlisted in Co. F, 26th Mich. Inf., under Capt. Lemuel Saviers, now of St. John's, Mich.

He was in the service throughout the remainder of the war, and was honorably discharged June 4, 1865, at Washington, D. C.

He went to Jackson, Mich., whence he enlisted, and later was assigned to duty at the Government bakery at Alexandria, Va.

In May, 1867, he came to Osceola County, and made a homestead claim of 160 acres in Sylvan Township.

He is one of the pioneer settlers of this portion of the township, and has improved about 60 acres of his land.

He was the leading active mover in securing the organization of the township, and has been Clerk and Notary Public.

He is a Republican in political creed and connections.

The marriage of Mr. Elmore to Clarissa E. Jones took place Dec. 25, 1869, in Orient Township.

She was born in Ronald Township, Ionia Co., Mich., May 13, 1852; and came with her parents to Osceola County in 1868.

Her parents were the first settlers of Orient Township, where they are still living.

Mr. and Mrs. Elmore are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

They have two children, Lizzie M., born Aug. 17, 1812, and Rosie V., born March 18, 1875.

 

James A. Lunney, farmer, Osceola Township, section 14, was born Nov. 7, 1847, in Halton Co., Ont.

His father, Hugh Lunney, was born in the north of Ireland.

He married Ann Noble in his native land, and when 22 years of age came to Ontario, where he became a lumberman of prominence, and resided until his death, Sept. 19, 1868, at the age of 49 years.

The mother is 58 years old, and lives in Gaylord, Mich.

Mr. Lunney was sent to the public schools of Ontario until he was 16 years old, and he passed three succeeding years assisting his father in lumbering.

In 1866 he came to Saginaw and became a member of the lumber firm of J. Henry & Co.

The relation existed seven years, the company transacting extensive operations in lumber and shingles at Hemlock City, Saginaw County.

In 1877 he came to Osceola County and purchased 160 acres in Osceola Township, a part of which was under cultivation.

He has added by later purchase to his home place until he holds 300 acres, and he also owns 700 acres in Clare County, Mich., which is principally in timber.

He has been engaged to a considerable extent in lumbering operations since he settled in this county.

The mill of the firm with which he is connected, situated on section 2, Hartwick Township, was recently destroyed by fire, entailing a loss of several thousand dollars.

Mr. Lunney has improved 115 acres of his homestead, and is now erecting an elegant residence designed to cost $5,000, and finished throughout the interior in hard wood of beautiful grain.

He aims to put his entire surroundings over which he has control in the best possible condition.

His business firm owns 1,400 acres of land, in which he holds an interest.

It comprises both pine and hard wood, and is all situated in Osceola County.

Politically Mr. Lunney is a Republican.

He was married Sept. 11, 1869, in Holly, Oakland Co., Mich., to Mary Ennes.

They have had two children: Vernon H. was born May 11, 1873, in Hemlock City; and Elmer M., Sept. 26, 1880, and died Feb. 29, 1884.

Mrs. Lunney is the daughter of James R. and Catherine (Reed) Ennes, natives of New York.

They reside at East Saginaw, where her father is manager of a carriage factory.

Mrs. Lunney was born Nov. 5, 1846, in Erie Co., Ohio.

Her parents became residents of Holly in 1869.

Alonzo M. Shank

Alonzo M. Shank, Sheriff of Osceola County, and proprietor of the Hersey City Flouring Mills, was born May, 2, 1850, in Hancock Co., Ohio.

Joseph Shank, his father, was born in the same county, Jan. 6, 1822.

In 1853 he removed his family and interests to a farm in Heath Township, Allegan County, coming thence in 1867, to Sherman Township, Osceola County, locating on an 80-acre farm, now in fine condition for agricultural purposes.

The mother, Sarah (Crow) Shank, was born July 31, 1828, in Hancock County.

Seven of their nine children are living.

Martha married Ashley Babbitt, a farmer in McPherson Co., Kansas.

Mr. Shank, of this sketch, is the second in order of birth.

John is a farmer; William Nicholas is a shingle manufacturer; Mary married Charles Marvin; Albert is still at home.

With the exception of the first and second they are residents of Sherman Township.

Joseph and Samuel are deceased.

In 1872 Mr. Shank secured 80 acres of land on section 10, Sherman Township, and he now owns 80 acres situated on the same section, having added 80 acres by later purchase.

In 1871 he began the manufacture of shingles in Heath Township, operating in that line of business two years.

In 1873 he took possession of his property in Sherman Township, where he has 130 acres of his land under cultivation, and is largely engaged in the raising of hay for the Cadillac market.

In the spring of 1878, he moved into Hersey, to manufacture shingles for W. S. Gerrish, running two mills, one within the corporation, the second situated one and a half miles east of the depot.

He continued their management four years.

In 1882 he bought a meat market and grocery, to which he gave his personal supervision one year, and then rented the stand.

In September, 1883, he bought a half interest in the Hersey City Flouring Mills, owned by A. Root.

Their joint ownership continued until Aug. 22, 1884, when Mr. Shank became sole proprietor by purchase.

The mill has three runs of stones, two sets of rollers, and a producing capacity of 70 barrels, besides the custom grinding of feed, etc.

Two assistants are employed.

Mr. Shank is a Mason, and belongs to the Blue Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter and Commandery.

He was elected to the position of Sheriff of Osceola County in the fall of 1882, on the Republican ticket, receiving a majority of 500 votes over the nominee of the opposition element.

Essie E. (Deffenbaugh) Shank

He was married June 19, 1870, in Sherman Township, to Essie E. Deffenbaugh.

Their children were born as follows: Bessie, Jan. 27, 1873; Cora, Feb. 6, 1875; Byron L., July 3, 1883.

Mrs. Shank was born May 4, 1853, in Morrow Co., Ohio, and is the daughter of Jacob and Hannah Deffenbaugh.

In the portraits of Mr. and Mrs. Shank, on other pages of this work, may be seen the fair types of the element on which the assured progress of Osceola County is based.

Intelligent, energetic, trustworthy, and public-spirited, Mr. Shank may be considered a representative of the spirit which gives the county an impetus in an onward course, notwithstanding the depression of the times, which have not yet corroded nor dimmed the luster of the era of the present of Osceola County.

 

Andrew J. Mapes, farmer and joiner, resident on section 14, Hartwick Township, was born Dec. 3, 1836, in Mayfield Township, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio.

His father, Rufus Mapes, was born in the State of New York, was a farmer, and died in 1875, in Ohio.

His mother, Abigail (Allen) Mapes, was a native of Maine and related to the celebrated Ethan Allen of Revolutionary fame, better known as the "Hero of Ticonderoga."

She died in Cuyahoga County, Jan. 14, 1882, and was the mother of 17 children, nine of whom are still living.

Mr. Mapes represents number 14 in the list of his parents' children, and he passed his minority under the parental roof.

On being released from his filial obligations he began to serve an apprenticeship for his trade, and after he had acquired a thorough knowledge of its details, he engaged in its prosecution and continued to pursue it as a vocation until 1866, the date of his removal to Michigan.

He settled in Osceola (now Hartwick) Township, securing a homestead claim of 120 acres of land on section 26 and purchasing 160 acres on section 14.

He lived on the first named property six years, working meanwhile at his trade in connection with farming.

In 1876 he removed to the farm situated on section 14, where he has improved 70 acres.

Politically he is a Republican of a decidedly radical type, and has served his township as Clerk.

He was married Nov. 27, 1869, in Mayfield, his native place, to Atnah M. Hawkins, who was born March 25, 1837, in Otsego Co., N. Y., and is the daughter of Smith and Lucy V. (Gardner) Hawkins.

She celebrated her 30th birthday dressing the first white child born in the township of Hartwick: this was Miss Emma, daughter of Loyd and Sarah Clark.

At that period her neighborhood was about 40 miles from the nearest physician or drug store, and Mrs. Mapes was for many years the only attendant upon the sick for many miles around.

In 1879, the only year she kept a record, she spent 200 days in this service.

On July 3, 1883, while she was riding horseback, she was thrown off and nearly killed, the injury being so great as to fracture the hip bone.

In her religious views she is a close-communion Baptist, with which Church she first connected herself, remaining with them as long as she was within convenient distance of their places of worship; she is now a member of the Disciples' Church.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Mapes are: Rufus S., born Dec. 3, 1864, and Melvin A., March 25, 1870.

Mr. Hawkins was born Nov. 4, 1809, in Otsego Co., N. Y.

His father, Rufus Hawkins, was born in Rhode Island, of English parents.

Mr. Hawkins remained in New York until he was 27 years old, when he came to Michigan and settled where Battle Creek is now situated, and moved thence to Ohio in 185 1, where he remained until 1866.

He then moved to Hartwick Township, settling on 160 acres on section 24, clearing 35 acres with his own hand.

He was a man of poor health and had not been able to do any labor, having been a school-teacher for 21 years.

The school-room being too confining for him, he started out with a wagon load of dry goods and crockery, which he peddled through the country, selling goods all the way from Ohio to this township.

He had located his land here the year before.

His mother was born in Rhode Island in 1759, of German and English descent, and went to New York in 1800, where she remained until her death.

Mr. Hawkins was the first settler in Hartwick; was the first Supervisor of the township, holding the position for many years.

A man had come in here before him, but Mr. Hawkins' was the first land located.

He and wife were members of the Baptist Church, joining in 1841.

They came to Michigan in 1837, settling where Battle Creek now stands and residing there 14 years.

They then moved to Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, and after 14 years' residence there, in 1866, they came to this county, where they both have since died, he at the age of 73 and she at the age of 63 years, and they are buried on the farm of Mr. Mapes, where is located the little grave-yard designated by the family name.

 

John J. Arndt, one of the first settlers and most widely known citizens of Osceola Township, is a resident on section 23, and is the proprietor of 260 acres of land.

He was born Oct. 21, 1824, in Prussia.

He was a pupil in the schools of his native country until he set out alone without money to make his way to America.

He shipped on a sailing vessel as a deck hand, and worked his passage, which consumed freight weeks.

This was in 1837, and he landed at the port of New York.

He proceeded soon after to Waterloo, Ont., where he found occupation as a farm assistant on the estate of John Eyte, and continued in that gentleman's employment eight years.

After leaving his service he bought 100 acres of forest land in Perth County, on which he began operations in his own behalf, and placed the entire acreage under improvements.

In 1873 he sold the place and came to Osceola Township, buying 340 acres of land on section 23.

He has sold 80 acres and placed nearly all the remainder under improvements.

The farm is justly ranked among the most valuable in this section of the county.

It is supplied with three flowing wells.

He is a Republican of an unmistakable and inflexible stamp, and has held local official positions for 12 years.

In 1858 he connected himself with the Evangelical Church, in whose interests he has been an unremitting and zealous laborer.

He has discharged the duties of all its offices and has been for many years Superintendent of the Sunday school, for whose welfare he has labored untiringly.

He was first married in Perth Co., Ont., in 1849, to Barbara Riffer.

She was born about 1828, in Germany, where her parents passed their entire lives.

She came in youth to Perth Co., Ont., where she died Jan. 13, 1863.

Of six children of whom she became the mother three are deceased - Elizabeth, Maggie and Lizzie.

Henry, Christina and Mollie survive.

Mr. Arndt was a second time married in 1864, in Perth Co., Ont., to Rebecca Leibert.

She was born in Ontario, of German parentage, and died in October, 1868, in Osceola Township, aged 33 years.

Of her six children, two preceded her to the land of the hereafter, - William and Betsey. John, Katie, Mary and Simon are living.

The wives of Mr. Arndt were both members of the Evangelical Church.

 

John Hoover, farmer, section 14, Evart Township, was born June 18, 1837, in Stark Co., Ohio.

His parents, Solomon and Margaret (Ringley) Hoover, removed from the Buckeye State in the fall of 1837, to the city of Wabash, Ind., where his father died Aug. 6, 1854.

Mr. Hoover was 16 years old, and was made executor of the estate by the will of his father, which entailed upon him the care of his mother, and he discharged the duty until the close of her life, Aug. 7, 1881.

She was born March 29, 1792, and was the mother of nine children.

Four sons and a daughter survive her: George, Mary, David, William and John. Daniel, Adam, James and Elizabeth are deceased.

Mr. Hoover grew to manhood in Wabash, and in March, 1867, came to Osceola County, where he had entered a homestead claim of 80 acres the year previous.

Besides improving his farm, he has engaged in lumbering during the winter seasons.

He affiliates with the Republican Party.

He was married Feb. 10, 1859, in Wabash Co., Indiana, to Eva Lenon.

Their children were born as follows: Charles E., March 30, 1860; Elizabeth, Nov. 24, 1861; Araminta, Feb. 23, 1863; Mattie, July 3, 1864; Daniel W., Feb. 12, 1866; George W., Nov. 19, 1867; John H, Dec. 26, 1868; Nettie S., Dec. 8, 1876.

Mrs. Hoover is the daughter of Daniel and Sophia (Saunders) Lenon.

Her father was a native of Miami Co., Ohio, and was a soldier in the Union service.

He died of diarrhea, June 19, 1864, in the hospital at Chattanooga.

Her mother died Dec. 13, 1880, in Wabash Co., Ind.

Their family included seven daughters and one son, born as follows: Sarali C., Elizabeth, Eva, Ruth C., Martha, Barbara, Phebe E. and John W.

 

Daniel Oaks, owner of the Oaks House at Reed City, and a saloon-keeper in that place, was born Nov. 24, 1835, in Worcester Co., Mass.

His father, Joel Oaks, was born in New Hampshire and died in Massachusetts, which was the native State of the mother, Abbie (Pierce) Oaks, who died at East Saginaw in 1880.

Mr. Oaks is the youngest of nine children born to his parents.

He was reared on the farm in the Bay State until he was 15 years of age, after which he obtained employ in the factories about five years,

He came to Detroit in 1855, and there became interested in the traveling entertainment business, in which he was occupied a long term of years.

He came to Reed City Jan. 1, 1872, and erected a small building on the south end of the lot which is his present location, and which was designated the "Blue Front."

In 1882 he built the hotel which bears his name.

It has a frontage of 100 feet and is 75 feet deep, is three stories high and can accommodate a large number of guests.

The house commands a liberal share of the best patronage.

The first floor has three store apartments.

Mr. Oaks built his present place of business in 1881.

It is constructed of brick, 80x50 feet in size, and is two stories in height above the basement.

He deals in the merchandise common to similar establishments.

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and is one of the Council.

Mr. Oaks is public-spirited and takes a considerable interest in local politics.

He was married in August, 1876, at Bowen's Mills, in Barry Co, Mich., to Mrs. Ellen E. Gates.

She was born in Allegan Co., Mich., and has a son by her former marriage, McGinley Gates.

 

John H. Lanphear, farmer, resident on section 30, Sylvan Township, was born Dec. 12, 1836, in Columbia Co., N. Y.

His parents, James A. and Rebecca R. (Shufeldt) Lanphear, were natives of the State of New York, and were descended from parents born in New England of English and German origin.

They are now in advanced years and reside in Columbia County.

Mr. Lanphear is the oldest of five children born to his parents, all of whom are living.

Two reside in the State of New York and two live in Massachusetts.

At the age of 19 he began to serve an apprenticeship in a machine shop, and spent 10 years in that business in Chatham, N. Y.

In 1877 he came to Jackson, Mich.; coming a year later to Osceola County, he located on 160 acres of land in Sylvan Township, of which he is still the owner of all but 40 acres which he has since sold.

He bought 40 acres on section 29 adjoining his homestead, and has placed 100 acres under improvements.

His farm buildings are creditable and suited to the needs of his farm.

He is a Republican in political opinions, and has served four years as Supervisor, Clerk two years, also as Treasurer and Highway Commissioner, and is at present a School Inspector.

He was married in Columbia Co., N. Y., to Hattie M. Messenger.

Their children are Frank C., James I., Carrie A. and Anna M.

Two died in infancy.

Mrs. Lanphear was born in Massachusetts, and removed in her childhood to New York.

 

John H. McMullan, farmer, section 26, Evart Township, was born Jan. 16, 1831, in Kilkenny Co., Ireland, of which county his parents were also natives.

His mother was born Nov. 2, 1809; his father, April 22, 1810.

They emigrated to America in i832, with two children—John and Mary Ann—(the latter is now deceased) and located at West Guillemsbury, Simcoe Co., Ont.

They purchased 100 acres of land, and soon after sold a portion of the property to a relative.

The remainder was sold soon afterward, and they entered a claim of 200 acres in the township of Mara, Ontario Co., Can.

They maintained a residence thereon about r8 years, when the father sold the farm and engaged in a mercantile enterprise in the same township, combining therewith the manufacture of potash.

He was Postmaster at that point for 18 years.

In 1865 Mr. McMullen sold his Canadian property entire, and in the fall of the same year came to Ottawa Co., Mich., where he remained three years on a farm, of which he became the owner.

He was not satisfied with the place, and in 1868 sold out and removed to Evart Township, where he bought 80 acres of wild, unimproved land.

He has cleared away the forest and has 62 acres in excellent farming condition, with good and valuable farm buildings.

He now owns 160 acres.

He is a Democrat in political connection and views.

He was married in Orillia, Ont., in 1864, to Jessie Elder, and they are the parents of eight children, viz.: William J., bom Oct. 22, 1864; Harry, Oct. 7, 1866; Julia, Oct. 19, 1868; David D., July 18, 1871; George M., Dec. 29, 1873; May, May 12, 1877; Ernest O., Feb. 29, 1880; Ada E., Nov. 6, 1882.

Mrs. McMullen is the daughter of James E. and Jeannette (Wilson) Elder, who reside in Mara, Canada.

She was born March 25, 1847.

The record of her brothers and sisters is as follows: Mary H., Jane L. (deceased), Wilhelmina, John E., James T., David W., Christina F., George M. and William M. Following is the record of the brothers and sisters of Mr. McMullen: Mary Ann (deceased), Ada, William A., Margaret A., Louisa (deceased), George M., Jane E. (deceased), David and Emma.

William C. and Margaret (Nesbitt) McMullen, the parents of Mr. McMullen of this sketch, removed to Osceola County in 1868 and reside on section 26, Evart Township.

The family is in sympathy with the Episcopal Church.

 

Alfred Davis, farmer and merchant, located on section 8, Hartwick Township, was born Feb. 18, 1844, in Steuben Co., New York.

His father and mother, George and Nancy (Holden) Davis, were natives of New England, of English descent, and were farmers by calling.

The county of Steuben was the scene of nearly the entire course of their earthly career, and there they both died, the former in October, 1866, the latter in 1880.

They had three children. Vincent resides in Steuben County; Matilda died in her native county in 1879.

Mr. Davis is the eldest, and attended the common schools until he was 16 years of age.

He remained at home until he was 22, when he engaged in general farm labor.

He was married March 22, 1862, in Steuben County, to Elida E. Robinson, a native of the same county, born April 9, 1844, of New England parentage and origin.

Wilbert, Emery, Benjamin, Denis and Daniel are the names of their children.

All but one are attendants at the public school of the district in which the family reside.

Mr. Davis was a farmer in his native county until 1870.

In the spring of that year he secured the homestead where he has since resided, which included 160 acres of land, then entirely wild and unbroken.

Of the original acreage he owns 79 acres, most of which is improved.

He is engaged in the sale of articles of merchandise, for which there is a local demand, and he manages his store in conjunction with the post office, of which he is the official, to which position he was appointed in 1881.

He is independent in political views and actions, and is Justice of the Peace and Township Treasurer.

His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

Delos A. Blodgett, lumberman and farmer, was born March 3, 1825, in Otsego Co., New York.

He is the son of Abiel D. and Susan (Richmond) Blodgett.

His father was born in Plymouth, N. H., April 21, 1794, was Sheriff of Otsego Co., N. Y., two terms, and otherwise a prominent citizen of that county.

His mother was born in Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Mass., November 19, 1796.

They were both of English descent.

There were five children born to them, namely: Albert A., Delos A., Ellen C., Helen R. and Harriet E.

Delos A., the subject of this biographical sketch, was named for Dr. Delos White, of Cherry Valley, N. Y., then his father's family physician, and was always called by his parents and schoolmates "Doc:" hence the cognomen of to-day.

When he was four years of age his father sold out his farming interests in Otsego County and settled in Erie Co., N. Y., near Springville.

Here Delos was reared and educated, going to school betimes, and helping his father on the farm.

When he was of sufficient age he was sent to the Springville Academy, where he remained, pursuing his studies during the school months, until the age of 20.

At this period—the spring of 1845—his father sold his farm, to be delivered to the purchaser the following year, with the intention then of going west and settling in Illinois.

Having a desire to see something of the world, Mr. Blodgett then formed his plans to make what was then considered an extensive tour.

Accordingly he set out from his parental home, and, having a preference for Western navigation, descended the Alleghany River.

From this he went down the Ohio River to the Mississippi and on this great “father of waters" was carried to New Orleans.

Here and at Vicksburg, he spent most of his. time, working at whatever would favorably present itself, until the fall of 1846, when he joined his parents, who had in the meantime purchased and settled on a farm in McHenry Co., Illinois.

Here he remained for two years, working with his father on the farm and attending school winters at the Geneva (Wis.) Academy.

In the fall of 1848, believing that by age and knowledge he was able to take care of himself, and probably do something more, he again left his home and started out to seek his fortune, arriving at Muskegon Village, his objective point, soon thereafter.

At this place he worked a year and a half at lumbering.

In July, 1850, he formed a partnership with Thos. D. Stimson, “pooling their issues," for the purpose of engaging in the lumbering or logging business up the Muskegon River.

They bought them a canoe, and p» loading it with supplies, haying implements, etc., started up the Muskegon.

With this canoe, they paddled, pushed and worked their way up the river, camping out nights and often wading, one pushing and the other pulling their little barge, which contained all their earthly possessions, up the rapids or over shoals until they reached a point 200 miles from their starting point, which was some miles above any other lumbering camp.

This was at the place where the little river - which has since become historical and known, as the "Doc and Tom," deriving its name from the given names of these two pioneers - effects a confluence with the Muskegon River.

One of their night camps was made at the mouth of the Hersey branch of the Muskegon River.

Here Mr. Blodgett was struck with admiration of the beautiful level of land bordering these rivers on the west side, and the magnificent elm forests, and made up his mind that if fortune favored him he would someday be the owner.

They arrived at their destination in August, looked up their beaver meadows and cut their hay for their coining winter's work.

This accomplished, they returned to Muskegon on foot.

Buying their oxen, supplies and other camp equipments, and hiring their men, they returned, driving their oxen before them.

From Big Rapids (which was then an unbroken wilderness) they had to drive their oxen through the thickest of woods, without any road or even a trail, to the mouth of the Doc and Tom, their future lumbering camp.

Here they labored through the winter, getting out their logs.

In the spring of 1851 they constructed some canoes, and when the river opened put in their camp outfit and started down the river, driving their logs before them, until they readied the rear of the main "drive."

Then Mr. Blodgett returned to Croton, purchased some potatoes, which he hauled to Big Rapids.

These he loaded into his canoe and started for the mouth of the Hersey, the place that had so captivated his fancy the previous summer.

The land all about here then belonged to the Government.

On arriving here he availed himself of the squatter's right, selected his land and chopped and logged off a piece by hand and planted his potatoes.

This was the first crop planted, and Mr. Blodgett was the first settler in the territory now embraced by Osceola County.

This land lay near the Muskegon River on the south side of the Hersey branch, and is embraced in the present village plat of Hersey and his now adjoining farm.

When done with his planting he looked up more pine lands in this and Muskegon County, and from this began his afterward extensive lumbering operations.

In 1852, he cleared up more ground, enlarging his potato crop, purchased the first 40 acres from the Government, which was the beginning of the farm now known as the "Blodgett Farm," in Hersey.

Mr. Blodgett continued to lumber winters and farm summers, purchasing additional lands from time to time, until the spring of 1858, when, with L. O. Schofield, of Branch Co., Mich., he erected a saw-mill and grist-mill at Hersey.

Before these mills, however, were fully completed, he purchased the interest of Mr. Schofield.

All the lumber used up to this time in putting up farm buildings was drawn from Newaygo County, a distance of 60 miles.

In the fall of 1859, he was married to Miss Jennie S. Wood, daughter of John and Clara L. Wood, of Woodstock, III.

She was born Aug, 26, 1841, at Jersey Shore, Lycoming Co., Pa.

He returned to Hersey with his bride, where they settled down to domestic life.

Of this marriage there were two children: John Wood, born July 26, i860, and Susan Richmond, born May 26. 1865.

In 1861, Mr. B., with B. F. Gooch and others, or ganized the first township, which then embraced the entire territory of the county, and which was called Richmond, from his mother's family name.

At this first election Mr. Blodgett was chosen Supervisor. He was instrumental in bringing about the organization of the county, which was effected in 1869, and caused the county-seat to be located at Hersey, where it still remains.

Upon the advent of the railroads, he platted the village of Hersey, in and about which his farm lands were located.

In 1870, he commenced the erection of his large and handsome residence, which was completed in 1871.

In this beautiful home he resided until the fall of 1881, wien he removed to Grand Rapids, where he now resides.

Mr. Blodgett started out in life with a purpose and worked up to it.

During the last 15 years, Mr. Blodgett has been extensively engaged in lumbering in Osceola, Missaukee and Clare Counties.

He is also the surviving member of the firm of Blodgett & Byrne, who are largely engaged in lumbering in Roscommon and Crawford Counties.

Here they have an extensive tract of fine pine timber, and operate a steam railroad, the track of which is laid with steel rails.

With this road they put in at the head of the Muskegon River from 25,000,000 to 30,000,000 feet of logs a year, which is floated down to Muskegon where they have their mills.

Mr. Blodgett has a natural taste for farming, and takes great pride in it.

He has several farms in different parts of the State; but his best farm, and the one to which he has given the most attention and in which he has the most pride, is at Hersey.

Here he is breeding the Norman and Percheron stock, having first imported this breed of horses direct from France.

Mr. B. has been eminently successful in his business operations, and is to-day one of the largest lumber operators in the State.

While this has been the result of his labors, it is gratifying to know that his successes have not been accomplished at the expense of his manhood, or his humanity, which is too often the result.

His hand is ever ready to help the poor or aid the deserving, while his heart always welcomes an old friend or acquaintance.

He is a pronounced Republican, and has been active and prominent in the politics of the county, as well as that of the State.

He has been a leading figure and an important factor in the growth and development of Osceola County from its first settlement to the present time; his individuality is clearly wedded to its annals and traditions; his life is a part of its history, which would be incomplete without this, his biography.

 

George F. Taylor, farmer, section 29, Hersey Township, was born May 15, 1846, in Portland, Ionia Co., Mich., and is the son of Charles and Mary (Olmstead) Taylor.

The latter died in April, 1859, in Portland. His father was born in 1817, and in 1836 came to Plymouth, Wayne Co., Mich., where he remained a year, going thence on foot to the township of Portland, at that date containing but four settlers.

He arrived there in the spring, when the roads were impassable; and as all supplies were brought from Detroit subsistence was a matter of some difficulty.

For two weeks Mr. Taylor's food consisted of greens and fish.

He was unmarried and made his way into the wilds of Michigan to establish himself preparatory to his founding a home. He returned to New York, and was married.

Mr. Taylor remained with his father five years after attaining his legal freedom.

He was then married and rented a farm, which he conducted one year, going thence to Portland village, where he was employed three years on the railroad.

He passed the year subsequent as a farm assistant, working by the month, when he became interested in the business of boring wells, and followed that calling two years.

In 1878 he came to Hersey Township, but did not take possession of the farm on which he now operates until 1883.

He was married April 22, 1872, to Delilah Kinney, daughter of Fernando C. and Huldah (Clark) Kinney.

Her mother died April 5, 1875, in Portland, and was nearly 64 years of age.

Her father has married again and resides on a farm in Hersey Township.

She was born June 10, 1846, in Portland, and is the third child of six born to her parents.

Mary A., Sarah A., Jerome and Harriet are living.

Sylvester was a soldier of the 27th Mich. Vol. Infantry, was wounded at Petersburg and was buried at City Point, July 6, 1864.

He sustained a flesh wound in the thigh, a bullet passing entirely through the limb, from the effects of which he died at the City Point Hospital four days later.

Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have been the parents of three children.

Elroy B. was born June 4, 1876, and died March 1, 1877.

An unnamed infant died when four days old.

Ray B. was born Jan. 27, 1883.

Mr. Taylor is an adherent of the Democratic Party.

 

William Bennett, farmer, section 14, Evart Township, was born Oct. 14, 1833, in Steuben Co., N. Y., and is the son of Thomas and Angeline (Jamison) Bennett.

The former was born April 5, 1810, in Steuben County. In 1869 he came to Michigan and is now a resident on section 28, Evart Township.

The mother of William was born June 14, 1809, and died Feb. 9, 1865, in Steuben County.

In the maternal line of descent Mr. Bennett is of Scotch lineage.

His father' came of Dutch ancestry.

He was reared on a farm in his native county and during his minority remained under his father's control.

On reaching the period of his legal freedom he went to Oconto Co., Wis., and engaged as foreman for the lumber firm of Eldredge & Balcom, with whom he continued a year.

At the end of that time he returned to the county where he was born, and again engaged for a time in agricultural pursuits.

He went back to the employment of Eldredge & Balcom in the Badger State, and after a service of six months he went to Butler Co., Iowa.

He bought a farm which he owned three years.

Meanwhile he went to Pike's Peak, there interesting himself in mining.

He came back to Iowa, sold his farm, and in May, 1868, came to this State and settled near Georgetown, Ottawa County, on Grand River, for two years, then one year in New York State, then for a time on Grand River again, and finally came to the township of Evart, where he bought the farm he now owns.

In the fall he went again to the State of New York, and during the winter which succeeded he managed a lumber camp in Pennsylvania.

In the spring of 1869 he returned to Osceola County and engaged as foreman in the lumber interests of Edward Cole, for whom he operated three years.

In 1872 he came to this township and commenced lumbering for Wright & Grove, and continued one year in their employment, his family meanwhile residing on the farm on which there were no improvements except a log house.

He has now 30 acres under the plow and a good frame house and barn.

Mr. Bennett is a Democrat in political conviction and action.

He has acted through four terms as Supervisor, has been School Director since he came here, and has served one year as Highway Commissioner.

He was married Dec. 14, 1858, to Frances A. Benaway, and they are the parents of seven children: Thomas was born Oct. 1, 1859; Alonzo, June 16, 1861; Elliott L., May 4, 1864; William, April 8, 1866; Carrie, Feb. 1, 1869; Jennie, June 23, 1871; Mortimer, April 23, 1873.

Mrs. Bennett is the daughter of Thomas and Lettia (Brewer) Benaway.

The former was born Jan. 9, 18i3, in Dutchess Co., N. Y.; the latter April 15, -809, in New Brunswick, N. J.

They had five children: Esther A. and Morgan M. are living; Andrew and Sarah A are deceased.

Mrs. Bennett was born Feb. 9, 1838, in Steuben Co., N. Y.

Mr. Bennett has two brothers— Benjamin R. and John J. Thomas is deceased.

Mary A., Addie and Permelia are his surviving sisters.

Nancy, Eliza and Sarah are not living.

 

Eli L. Hayes, Supervisor of Richmond Township, was born Jan. 25, 1852, in New Haven, Conn.

His father, Eli D. Hayes, was born Sept. 25, 1825, and is still pursuing the business of wood engraver and landscape painter, in which he has passed his life.

His mother, Cordelia (Lewis) Buck, was born April 6, 1828, in Newton, Fairfield County, Conn.

Mr. Hayes was a resident of New Haven and attended school until he was 17 years old, when he engaged as a surveyor with his brother, and acquired a practical knowledge of the business, which he followed several years.

At the age of 18 years, he engaged in surveying for wall maps for F. W. Beers & Co. and C. O. Titus, following the calling in portions of Michigan and in Osceola County.

In 1879 he settled in Reed City, and in company with a man named Lewis, founded a grocery and crockery trade, under the style of Hayes & Lewis, the relation existing five years, and including a traffic in builders' materials.

They afterward sold their entire interests and are now arranging and settling their business affairs.

Mr. Hayes is the proprietor of a considerable amount of properly at Reed City, and owns ten acres of land in the vicinity of New Haven, Conn.

He was married Sept. 17, 1879, at Reed City, to Anna Lewis, and they have one child, Eli, born July 2, 1880.

Mrs. Hayes was born Sept. 14, 1856, in Sanilac Co., Mich., and is the daughter of William and Emmeline Lewis.

 

John Hoffmeyer, farmer, section 24, Osceola Township, was born May 8, 1833, in Perth County, Ontario.

His parents were born in Germany, where his father pursued the vocation of millwright.

They emigrated from the fatherland in early life, settling in Canada.

The father died there about 1863.

In 1866 the mother became an inmate of the family of her son.

She died in 1883, aged 81 years.

Mr. Hoffmeyer was a pupil in the common schools until he was 19 years old.

He began his career of independence as a teamster, which was his business about three years.

In the fall of 1855 he went to Toledo, Ohio, where he obtained employment in the ship yards.

He continued to work there and as a carpenter two years. In 1857 he went to work in the machine shops of the railroad at Toledo, and in the switch-yard, and was appointed fireman on the Michigan Southern Railroad.

Six months of service in that position was succeeded by an appointment as engineer for the same corporation, in which capacity he operated two years.

He next engaged as engineer on the Cleveland Railroad, where he was occupied three years.

In the early 1860’s, associated with another man, he purchased a canal boat.

After 18 months of canal experience he disposed of his interest in inland navigation property and returned to Toledo, where he again engaged in the ship-yards.

One year later he came to Osceola County and labored a year in the saw-mills of D. A. Blodgett.

At the end of that time he located on the Muskegon River, at a point now included in Osceola Township.

This was in 1866, and he was the first permanent settler in the township, his nearest neighbor being 16 miles distant.

He secured his farm under the regulations of the homestead law, including 160 acres of land.

He is now the owner of 270 acres of land in Osceola Township and 510 acres in the county.

He has a choice and valuable farm, now comprising 1 to acres of improved and cultivated land.

He is a decided Republican and radical in his political views.

He has officiated five years as Justice of the Peace and held several other official positions in Osceola Township.

He was married Oct. 7, 1855, in Toledo, to Mary A. Dane.

They have had eight children.

Two died when infants.

Edward, Frank, Charles, Laura, Alonzo and Ella M. are living.

Mrs. Hoffmeyer was born Sept. 28, 1833, in England, which was the native country of her parents, Richard and Ann Dane.

The family came to Ontario in 1841, where the father died about 1850, and the mother July 25, 1884.

The death of the father left a family of six children dependent upon the exertions of the older members.

Mrs. Hoffmeyer was the oldest and devoted herself to the maintenance of the family until her marriage.

 

Charles Peel, farmer, section 23, Hartwick Township, was born October 12, 1838, in Leicestershire, England.

His father, William Peel, emigrated from his native country with his wife and children in 1842, locating in Avon, Lorain County, Ohio.

Pr. Peel was three years of age when his parents became residents of the Buckeye State, where he remained during the years of his minority and obtained his education in common schools.

On obtaining his majority he came to Michigan, making his first location in Jamestown, Ottawa County, where he engaged in farming on 40 acres of land, of which he became proprietor by purchase.

In the second year of the War of the Rebellion he enlisted at Grand Rapids in the First Regiment, Mechanics and Engineers, enrolling in Co. H, Capt. W. P. Ennis.

His command joined the Army of the Cumberland and Mr. Peel was a participant in the battles of Perryville, Lavergne, and Bentonville, besides being in various minor affairs.

He escaped without wound or capture, and was honorably discharged June 19, 1865, after a military service of more than two years.

He was made Corporal, and in August, 1864, was promoted to Second Sergeant.

He returned on leaving the army to Oakfield, Kent Co., Mich., where he engaged as assistant in a saw and shingle mill, spending three years in that employment.

In 1867 he purchased 40 acres of land in that township, on which he operated two years, going thence to Greenville, Montcalm Co., Mich.

Some months later he sold his interests there, and in the same year, 1868, he purchased 40 acres which has since been his home.

He is now the owner of 120 acres, and 80 acres of the tract are under improvements and cultivation.

He is an exceptionally good farmer.

Mr. Peel was formerly a Republican, but is now a supporter of the principles of the Prohibition element.

He has officiated in his township as Treasurer and School Assessor.

He was married Jan. 1, 1860, in Paris, Kent County, to Lucy A. Leman, and they have had seven children, - William A., Albert W., Elnora, Percy J., Harvey F., Howard E. and Frank E.

Mrs. Peel was born July 6, 1840, in Newfane, Niagara Co., N. Y., and was 12 years of age when, she came with her parents to Paris, where she was reared and educated.

She is a member of the Baptist Church.

 

George Shay, liveryman, at Reed City, was born October 12, 1834, in Schoharie, New York, and is the son of William and Anna (diver) Shay.

His father was a miller and owned a mill on Foxen Creek, a stream which flowed through the township.

In 1844 the family removed their residence to Cleveland, Ohio, where Mr. Shay was employed in the Cuyahoga Works, and acquired a knowledge of engineering, in which he was occupied several years.

He came to Salem Township, Michigan, and bought a small farm on which he was resident until his removal in 1875 to Isabella County, where he owned 40 acres of land, and there maintained a residence two years.

He came to Reed City in the spring of 1877 and founded his present business.

He has about 15 horses generally in his stables and livery appointments suited to his patronage.

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and of the A. O. U. W.

He has officiated six years as member of the Village Council.

Mr. Shay owns his business premises, residence and other village property.

His marriage to Martha M. Higginson took place April 15, 1857, in Superior, Washtenaw Co., Mich.

She was born Oct. 16, 1837, in Detroit.

Their children are, William, Emma and Ida.

 

George W. Leeman, farmer and lumberman, resident on section 23, Hartwick Township, was born April 26, 1840, in Albany Co., N. Y.

His father was born in the north of Ireland, of Scotch parentage.

He came to the United States with his parents when he was two years old and resided in Albany Co., N. Y., many years.

He was married there and soon afterward came to Michigan and settled in the township of Paris, in Kent County, and afterward to Oakfield, where he lives now, aged about 78 years.

The mother, Sallie A. (McKinley) Leeman, was of Scotch descent, and was born in Albany Co., N. Y.

She died Sept. 19, 1883, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Sarah E. Mowitt, whom she was visiting.

They had 12 children.

Mr. Leeman is the fifth child in order of birth. He came to Kent County when he was 14 years of age.

After securing a good practical education and living at home with his parents until he was 24 years of age, he became, in 1864, the owner of 80 acres of land, which he increased to 120 acres by later purchase in the township where his father was a landholder.

In 1867 he sold his property and removed to Osceola County, purchasing 40 acres of land on section 23, Hartwick Township, on which he settled, and later purchased a like quantity of land in addition.

He afterward sold the latter to E. J. Terrill, and has placed all the remaining portion—his original purchase—under improvements.

In political affiliation Mr. Leeman is a Republican with prohibition principles, and he has officiated as Highway Commissioner in his township and as Justice of the Peace.

He was married Nov. 10, 1864, in Greenville, Montcalm Co., Mich., to Hannah M. Huff.

They have one child,—Gracie Bell, born Feb. 22, 1876.

Mrs. Leeman was born June 23, 1839, in Orion, Oakland Co., Mich.

She attended the common schools of her native county until she was 15 years old, and after her parents removed to Greenville she completed her education in Montcalm County.

She began teaching there, and continued that calling until she had served 17 terms successful labor as an educator.

Her parents, John and (Fuller) Huff, are still living in Montcalm County, and are aged respectively 72 and 67 years.

They are of German descent, he a native of the State of New York, and she of Vermont.

 

Frederick J. Fleischhauer, wagon and carriage manufacturer, general blacksmith at Reed City, and manager of the Clifton House, was born Sept. 23, 1854, in Waterloo, Ontario.

He is the son of John W. and Mary Fleischhauer, and was reared on his father's farm in Waterloo Co., Ont.

He was 17 years of age when he began to acquire the knowledge necessary to the prosecution of the business in which he has been actively engaged for many years, and he served an apprenticeship of three years at Wellesley, in his native county, afterwards becoming a journeyman and operating in that method eight years.

In 1881 he went to Milwaukee, Wis., and, three months later, proceeded to Reed City, where he opened his shop in December, 1881.

He is doing a successful business, requiring two assistants in the various departments except in wood work, all of which is made by his own hands. ,

He purchased the Clifton House in October, 1883.

The establishment accommodates a limited number of guests and has a restaurant attached.

The property belongs to his wife.

He is the owner of his shops and their sites.

Mr. Fleischhauer was married Oct. 19, 1883, at Reed City, to Ernestine Treptow.

She was born in Canada Sept. 13, 1857.

One child, Edward F., was born of their union, at Reed City, Sept. 23, 1884.

Mr. Fleischhauer has one daughter by an earlier marriage, Caroline, born in November, 1879, in Richmond Township.

 

Warren A. Wagar, Supervisor of Sylvan Township and farmer on section 28, was born Aug. 17, 1840, in Yates Co., N. Y.

Charles Wagar, his father, was a native of the same State and followed the pursuit of agriculture in Yates County until his death, which occurred in 1841, within the first year of the life of his son.

His mother, Sophronia (Wier) Wagar, is a native of New York, and is now a resident of Wayne County in that State, and is aged 67 years.

After the death of Mr. Wagar she again married.

Warren was a member of his mother's family until he was 13 years of age, when he found a home with a young man named Gage.

Between three and four years later, he became an inmate of the household of Morgan Gage, father of his former patron, with whom he remained until he was 22 years of age, attending school and obtaining a knowledge of the builder's trade. 1

He was married Aug. 27, 1862, in Yates County, to Mary A. Green.

She was born in that county and died there in June, 1864, leaving one child, Charles, who was born Oct. 9, 1863.

The wife and mother when dying urged his speedy union with a friend to whose care she wished to entrust her infant child, and in accordance Mr. Wagar was married Feb. 16, 1865, to Jennie M. Van Liper.

She was born Nov. 9, 1845, in the State of New York, and is the daughter of Jeremiah Van Liper.

One child constitutes the issue of this marriage, Elnora, born Sept. 23, 1866.

After his marriage Mr. Wagar was occupied at his trade, which he pursued with success until 1877 in his native State.

In that year he concluded to seek a home in Michigan, which he did and made his location on the place where he now resides, April 27, 1877.

He at first purchased 120 acres of land, to which he added five acres soon after.

Later, he sold 40 acres, and has about 20 acres of the remaining 85 acres under the plow.

He is the owner of a half interest in 80 acres' of pine land on section 24.

Politically he is a Democrat and has been Justice of the Peace two years; is the present incumbent.

 

Wellington Welch, farmer, section 25, Hartwick Township, was born Aug. 16, 1843, in Euclid, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio.

His parents, Sardis and Marinda (Dillie) Welch, were natives respectively of Connecticut and Ohio, and of Scotch and French descent.

The former died in 1857, the latter in 1880.

Mr. Welch is the youngest of the six children included in his father's family, and was reared at home.

When he was 18 he entered the Union army to aid in quelling the Rebellion, enrolling in Co. C, the color company of the 18th U. S. Inf., under the command of Lieut. Col. O. L. Shepherd, and attached, after being mustered into the service, to the Army of the Cumberland.

He was in active service in 13 engagements, among them the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Hoover's Gap, Mission Ridge, and the campaign under Sherman till the fight before Atlanta.

He received two gun-shot wounds at Stone River,—one in the arm and one in the hip.

He was hit five times in the same engagement, his clothing being severely torn.

Among other casualties it sustained was the scalping of his cap, the top of which was taken cleanly off!

He was discharged before Atlanta, Aug. 7, 1864, from Co. B, First Battalion.

The company was so cut to pieces at the battle of Stone River that a sufficient number was not left to form as a company, and the remnant was transferred, Mr. Welch going to Co. B.

He returned to his home and resumed his place as assistant on the family homestead, his brother, Orlando B., enlisting in another company and regiment.

Soon after his return to his home he entered the commercial college at Cleveland and completed a course of study in 1866.

He spent two years subsequently in farming.

His marriage to Cecelia Dillie occurred Oct. 14, 1868, in the place of his birth, and they have one child, Alice L., born April 21, 1870.

Mrs. Welch is the daughter of Milton and Lauretta (Lilly) Dillie.

Her father was born in Pennsylvania, her mother in New York.

They are now residents of Euclid, Ohio.

In January, 1868, Mr. and Mrs. Welch came to Michigan to establish a home, and made a homestead claim of 120 acres of land on section 28, in Hartwick Township.

The place was entirely wild, and in an unsatisfactory location, and after a year's residence they decided to make a change, and purchased 40 acres, afterwards 40 acres more, in the same township, three-fifths of the tract being now under cultivation.

Mr. Welch is a Republican.

He has been Township Clerk four terms, and is now School Director.

He is Clerk of the Wesleyan Methodist Church, of which he and wife are members.

He has been connected with the Odd Fellows.

 

John Smith, farmer, section 12, EvartTownship, was born Sept. 7, 1833, in York, Washtenaw Co., Mich.

His parents, Harmon and Eliza (Davenport) Smith, are natives of the State of New York.

They removed in 1847 to Ronald Township, Ionia County.

His mother descended from the Davenport brothers, - John, Isaac and Morris, - whose posterity has kept intact the lineage record from their emigration to this country in the Colonial period, and who were Quakers in religious sentiment.

She was born July 19, 1812, either in Dutchess or Orange Co., N. Y.

The father was born Sept. 27, 1805, in Lima, Livingston Co., N. Y.

Mr. Smith went to Iowa when 23, and after passing a year in the Buckeye State returned to Ionia.

He came to the township of Evart Feb. 11, 1867, at a period when the natural condition of the county afforded ample scope for the indulgence of his tastes and proclivities for hunting and trapping, which he turned to profit, and which he has pursued more or less ever since for sport when no necessity urged.

He settled on 80 acres of land, where he has since resided.

He was married, in Orient Township, Dec. 12, 1865, to Mary Ann Tennant.

She was born Dec. 29, 1845, in Macomb Co., Mich., and is the daughter of William and Betsey (Burdick) Tennant, of Orient Township (see sketch).

Mr. and Mrs. Smith have had six children: Harmon, born Dec. 17, 1867; Rhoda, Oct. 7, 1871; Alva, March 20, 187- Ida born Sept. 11, 1869, died Oct. 26, 1879; Alva, born April 12, 1876, died Nov. 13, 1879; Ethan, born Dec. 7, 1873, died Nov. 1, 1879.

These children died within three weeks, of diphtheria.

Their mother joined her little ones gone before to the land of the silent majority April 1, 1881.

Mr. Smith is a Democrat. He has been Treasurer three terms, and Highway Commissioner and Justice of the Peace one term each.

 

Herman Stephan, farmer, section 20, Richmond Township, was born in Germany, Sept. 15, 1843, of which country his parents, Gottlieb and Julia Stephan, were also natives.

They emigrated to the Dominion of Canada in 1855, when their son was 13 years of age.

The latter remained there until 1862, the date of his removal to Osceola County.

His first homestead claim of 80 acres is included in the farm of 118 acres of which he is now the owner, and of which 98 acres have surrendered to the forces of energy, judgment and perseverance that have been brought to bear on them, and are under creditable and profitable cultivation.

In the fall of 1863 Mr. Stephan enlisted in the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, and remained in the military service of the United States until the close of the war.

Still true to the principles for which he braved the fate of the war, he is a supporter and endorser of the issues of the Republican Party.

He was first married Sept. 19, 1865, in Richmond Township, to Mary Ruppert, and they had four children, - Ernest, William, Laura and Julia.

Their mother died Sept. 17, 1875.

Mr. Stephan was again married Nov. 21, 1875, to Elizabeth Schnatz.

She was a native of Germany, as was her predecessor, and was born April 4, 1853.

Two children born of the second marriage died in infancy. Four survive,—Mary, Catherine, Herman and Lizzie.

The parents belong to the Lutheran Church.

 

Charles M. Collins, senior member of the firm of Collins & Amspoker, manufacturers and dealers in furniture and undertakers' wares, at Reed City, was born July 1, 1844, in Brant Co., Ont.

At the age of 23 years Mr. Collins took leave of the farm where he had been brought up, and went to Stratford, Ont., where he obtained a situation in the agricultural house of Sharman Brothers as traveling salesman, in which capacity he passed a year; he then spent two years in the acquisition of the trade of a cabinet-maker at St. Mary's, Ont.

He went then to Atchison, Kan., and operated in that line a few months.

He removed next to a farm in Brantford, Washington Co., Kan., operating as a farmer and builder until the date of his coming to Reed City, in the fall of 1876.

He bought the site of his present business stand, erected a building and commenced the sale of furniture.

In 1879 he erected a brick building in the rear of the store, fitted it up with machinery and began the manufacture of the wares in which he deals.

He formed a partnership with T. J. Amspoker, Oct. 1, 1881, and they have a stock which represents a cash value of about $10,000, and transact annually an extensive business.

The warehouse of the firm fronts on Higbe Street.

Mr. Collins was married at Norwichville, Dec. 25, 1866, to Mary Ann Clemmens.

She was born in Bronte, Ontario, June 1, 1845, and is the daughter of Thomas Clemmens.

They have five children: Lillie was born Feb. 25, 1868, in Stratford, Ontario; Leland was born April 17, 1871, in Brantford, Kansas, where Gertrude was born October 20, 1874; Frankie was born June 18, 1879; and Georgie, May 23, 1880.

The two last named were born at Reed City.

 

Stephen H. Allen, farmer, section 36, Burdell Township, was born Feb. 22, 1818, in Kentshire, England.

At the age of 16 he entered the British sailing service and became a sailor on the Atlantic and Indian Oceans.

During the 20 years in which he was a seaman, he was engaged t2 years as a marine and in the naval military service during the war with China in 1840-1, and was on the coast of Africa five years, engaged in the capture of slave vessels.

He sailed on all the seas and oceans of the Eastern continent and visited all the European nations that had a seaboard.

He came to the port of New York in 1852, where he was soon after married to Eliza Conway.

They have had seven children: William E. was born Feb. 15, 1853, Joseph P., Nov. 1, 1855; Edward E., Sept. 26, 1861; Stephen, Feb. 22, 1862.

Stephen H. (1st) John and Mary are deceased.

Mrs. Allen was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, Dec. 5, 1832, and lived in her native country until her marriage.

After that event Mr. Allen established a mercantile business in Brooklyn, and also operated as a ship-rigger, carrying on both branches of business until 1859, the year of his removal to the West.

He located first in Chicago, where he resided three years.

Among his experiences in the Garden City were two disastrous fires, which involved heavy loss and inconvenience.

He came thence to Plymouth, Ind. where he was variously employed four years.

He removed his family in 1874 to Kalamazoo, where he left them, and came to Osceola County.

He located a homestead claim of 80 acres, on which he made some improvements and returned to Kalamazoo.

The Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad was then in process of construction, and he became an employee of the corporation, and worked on the line until it reached the vicinity of his home, where he brought his family for the first time.

There the first opening in that part of the county was made at a time when Reed City was but little more than begun, and Cadillac had no existence, either in fact or fancy.

His place is now nearly all improved and has suitable and good farm belongings.

Mr. Allen continued to work on the line of railroad as it extended north until it reached Rapid River, when he returned to his farm labor.

He is a Democrat in political persuasion, and is an Episcopalian in Church connection: Mrs. Allen is a Catholic.

He has been Justice of the Peace nine years and held the various school offices.

 

William H. Staninger, farmer on section 12, Osceola Township, was born Oct. 11, 1841, in Mercer Co., Pa.

He received a common-school education, and at the age of 20 years he began to operate as a farm laborer, coming to Michigan in 1854.

In the course of the second year of the war he entered the army, enlisting Aug. 6, 1862, from Lenawee County, in the 18th Regt. Vol. Inf.

His Captain was Charles R. Miller, latterly a prominent citizen of Adrian.

The regiment was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland, and the period of Mr. Staninger's military service was two years and ten months, or until the practical close of the war.

He fought at Decatur and Athens, Ala., escaping unhurt, and received his discharge May 16, 1865, at Huntsville, Ala.

He returned to Lenawee County, and was occupied on his father's farm until March, 1870.

At that date he severed his business relations there and proceeded to Osceola County and Township, securing 200 acres of wholly unimproved land.

All surroundings and circumstances were of the pioneer order, neighbors were remote, supplies high-priced and market far away; but all obstacles were surmounted with cheerful courage and unremitting toil, and Mr. Staninger has 90 acres of well-improved land.

He is an adherent of the party whose interest he fought for and to which he clings with perfect loyalty.

He was married March 3, 1866, in Morenci, Lenawee Co., Mich., to Alida J. Partridge.

She was born March 3, 1850, in Lenawee County, and is the daughter of Ira J. and Sachra M. (Berger) Partridge.

Her parents were born and married in the State of New York, and came to Michigan about 1834.

Her father died March 28, 1884, in Osceola County.

Her mother lives in Adrian and is 63 years old.

Two children are included in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Staninger: Viola, born Sept. 3, 1867; and Earl, April 14, 1884.

 

Henry H. Freedman, cigar manufacturer at Reed City, was born June 16, 1854, in Hungary, of which country his parents, Joseph and Lena Freedman, were also natives.

He was brought up on a farm and emigrated to the United States in 1870.

He passed two years at Cleveland, Ohio, and returned to the land of his birth in 1873. He visited there six months and again crossed the sea to America, locating in Coldwater, Mich.

He learned his business of cigar-making of B. S. Tibbitts of that place, and continued to operate in Branch County for some years.

In February, 1883, he came to Reed City and established his business, which has gradually grown in popularity and increased in extent.

He employs eight men, and is putting upon the market the cigars known to the trade as the “Unknown," the “Eclipse," "Osceola" and "Reed City."

He puts out about 35,000 monthly and rolls all kinds of manufactured tobaccos.

Mr. Freedman is a member of the Masons, - lower body, Royal Arch Chapter and Jacobs Commandery, No. 10, at Coldwater.

He also belongs to the Encampment.,

He was married June 27, 1877, in Coldwater, to Louise Graff, and they have one daughter— Blanche—born Feb. 24, 1884, at Reed City.

Mrs. Freedman was born June 17, 1857, in Rochester, N. Y.

 

Edward Baumgardner, farmer, section 33, Richmond Township, is the son of Jacob and Catherine (Koutz) Baumgardner, natives of Switzerland and Pennsylvania respectively.

After their marriage they settled in Ohio, and subsequently moved to Van Buren County, Michigan, going thence to Ionia County where they remained until death.

They had four children,—Edward C., Noah and Seymour. One died in infancy.

Mr. Baumgardner was born Sept. 16, 1852, in Van Buren Co., Mich.

He was a student at public schools until he was 18 years of age.

He remained at home three years after that age, when he began to work by the month, in which method he operated seven years, farming summers and in the lumber woods winters.

In 1876 he bought 80 acres of land in Richmond Township, under some improvements, on which he settled in the spring of 1882.

Two thirds of the place is now in a good state of cultivation.

In political connection he is a Republican and has held the office of School Assessor.

He was married in Richmond Township, April 10, 1879, to Mary J. Robbins, and they have two children,—L. J., born Jan. 24, 1880, and Leo V., born Dec. 18, 1882.

Mrs. Baumgardner is the daughter of James G. and Olive E. Robbins.

(See sketch of J. G. Robbins.)

She was born June 4, 1861, in Richmond Township, and is the first white child born in Osceola County.

 

Robert Nixon, farmer, section 35, Evart Township, was born Feb. 11, 1844, in Belleville, Hastings Co., Ontario.

His parents, John and Margaret Nixon, were natives of Ireland.

They came to America in the early part of the present century, settling first in Ottawa, Can., where they resided a few years, and removed to Madock Township, Hastings Co., Ont., where they have since resided.

Mr. Nixon commenced the life of a lumberman when he was 17 years of age, and operated as such in the Canadian forests, where he spent five winters, meanwhile passing the summer seasons on the lakes as a sailor, operating on his last trip as mate.

In 1861 he came to Cape Vincent, Jefferson Co., N. Y., and in 1865 settled permanently in Osceola County, since which time he has passed every winter season in the woods except two.

In 1877 he bought an unimproved farm, on which he located, and now has 40 acres cultivated and 10 acres chopped (1884).

Since coming to Michigan he has operated as foreman of the camps of different parties.

His first employment in that capacity was with Brown & Nestor, on Tobacco River.

He was next with Smith Brothers at Sturgeon Creek, and subsequently with Shaw & Williams and Mark Fleitze.

Mr. Nixon is a Republican in political sentiment, and served two years as School Director in Chippewa Township, Mecosta County.

He was married Aug. 7, 1874, to Jane McCormick, and they are the parents of four children: Flora, born Jan. 3, 1876: Charles, June 20, 1877; Wellington, Jan. 26, 1879; Manly, Oct. 13, 1882.

Mrs. Nixon is the daughter of Archibald and Flora (McCallum) McCormick.

Both parents died in Puslinch, Wellington Co., Ont., the demise of her father occurring when she was a year old, and she was wholly orphaned when she was two years of age.

She was born Aug. 7, 1855, in Puslinch, and has two brothers - John and Archibald.

She is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

 

Nathan O. Pettibone, farmer on section 28, Hartwick Township, and civil engineer by profession, is the son of Roswell and Harriet (Ball) Pettibone.

His father was born about 1788, in the State of Vermont, and probably underwent as many years of pioneer experience as any man who ever lived.

Vermont was admitted as a State in 1790, and the events in her history immediately preceding that era form some of the most interesting records of the annals of the settlement and adjustment of this continent.

In 1826 he came to Oakland Co., Mich.

At that date few white men aside from the Indian traders were permanently settled in the State, and in that section the "Lo" family were more numerous than agreeable.

He secured considerable tracts of valuable land in that county, whose agricultural facilities are well known, going later to the county of Monroe.

In 1838 he purchased a small property in Hillsdale County, where he lived a little more than 30 years and died, in t87o, aged 82 years.

He was a soldier of 1812, enlisting from the State of New York.

While in Monroe Co., Mich., the famous Toledo "War" was on the carpet,' which served as the source of much excitement, and he was in a community of Southern Michigan when the place was greatly disturbed by the chances and apprehensions resulting from the Black Hawk War.

The mother of the subject of this sketch was born in New England and died in February, 1835, in Monroe County.

Five children survived to bless her memory, four of whom are yet living.

A daughter, Harriet, was married in Washtenaw Co., Mich., and is deceased.

John is a farmer in Clare County.

Lydia (Mrs. Duesler) resides on a farm near Hersey.

Sarah (Mrs. Brockway) lives at South Allen, Hillsdale Co., Mich.

Mr. Pettibone was born May 30, 1830, in Farmington, Oakland Co., Mich., and was little more than four years old when his mother died.

He was cared for by the family survivors and reared to the age of 18 years with few school privileges, owing to the pioneer condition of the country.

On approaching manhood he realized keenly his deficiencies, and devoted every leisure opportunity to the acquirement of information to remedy the defect.

Feeling that he was and should be in need of a thorough knowledge of grammar, he' procured a copy of Brown's text-book on that subject, then holding a place of honor in the common curriculum of study, and committed not only the "Rules" to memory, but also nearly the entire work.

A thorough familiarity with the book is in itself a liberal education.

At the age of 21 he commenced teaching, which vocation he followed until he entered the military service of the United States, a little more than a year after the breaking out of the Rebellion.

He enlisted Aug. 28, 1862, at Angola, Steuben Co., Ind., in the 74th Volunteer Regiment of that State.

The regiment joined the Army of the Cumberland, and Mr. Pettibone participated in its chances until his discharge in the winter of 1864.

He was under fire at Perryville and at Hartsville.

On obtaining his liberty once more he returned to Southern Michigan, and in the spring following (1865) he came to Osceola County.

He secured a homestead claim in the- township and near the village of Hersey, situated on the Muskegon River.

At that period there was not a location made north of his place for many miles along the course of the river.

His education and tastes fitted him to supply a peculiar demand of the place and period, and he at once gave his attention to land prospecting and surveying, in both which avenues he has continued to operate with gratifying results.

In 1875 he purchased 100 acres of land in the township of Hartwick, where he has operated as a farmer and been active in his professional duties.

In political principle and connection he is a Prohibitionist.

He has been County Surveyor three terms, Township Treasurer and Supervisor, and held all the minor local offices.

He was married in September, 1875, near Independence, Iowa, to Amelia Roberts.

Of their five children one is deceased.

The others are recorded as follows: Elva, married; Fred resides in Colorado; Emma and Frank live at home.

Mrs. Pettibone was born in 1833, in Dexter, Washtenaw Co., Mich., and is the daughter of George and Temperance (Monroe) Roberts.

Both her parents are deceased. She is a member of the Congregational Church.

James E. Bevins

James E. Bevins, Judge of Probate and Postmaster at Le Roy, was born in the town of Conesus, Livingston Co., N. Y., July 27, 1843.

He received a common-school education by working on a farm in summer and attending school in the winter: also attended high school at Bergen Academy, Genesee Co., N. Y., two terms.

He came to Michigan in the spring of 1866; worked at the carpenter's trade during the summer in Kent County; went north in the fall and worked for J. H. Rogers in Mecosta County one year in a store.

Built a store at Paris in 1867, and commenced mercantile business in partnership with his brother under the firm name of Bevins Bros.

Mr. Bevins was married to Miss Alice Haynes, Oct. 3, 1869.

In 1870 he homesteaded in Osceola County; built branch store at Le Roy in fall of 187 1 and moved on the homestead in Le Roy Township.

He was appointed Postmaster in March, 1872, and still holds the office.

He bought 80 acres of land where Le Roy stands, and platted the village in 1873.

He has served two terms as Supervisor of his township, once by appointment and once by election.

He was agent for the United States Express Company four years.

Was elected President in 1883, when Le Roy was incorporated as a village, and re-elected in 1884, receiving every vote cast at the election.

He voted for Abraham Lincoln in 1864 and voted the Republican ticket ever since.

At the Republican County Convention of 1884 he received the nomination for Judge of Probate, and was elected by 773 majority, running ahead of his ticket in the county and in his own township.

In Le Roy he had 130 majority over both the Democrat and Prohibition candidates, the vote standing: J. E. Bevins, Rep., 179; D. McGovern, Dem., 34; W. A. Lewis, Pro., 15.

Mr. Bevins' parents were John and Olive (nee Hubble) Bevins.

His grandfather on his father's side came from Wales, and his grandmother was a German.

His mother's people came from Connecticut and settled in Conesus about the year 1812.

The subject of this sketch is the youngest of 12 children, six boys and six girls.

His mother died when he was six years old, and his father married a Miss Mary Ann Perry, about 1852, and by her had three children,—two sons and one daughter,—making a family of eight boys and seven girls.

His father died in Chili, Monroe Co., N. Y., in 1864, at the age of 72 years, leaving all of his 15 children alive at the time of his death.

Four of the children have since died all being over 50 years of age at the time of their death.

One of the children (a boy), by his second wife, was drowned at the age of 27 years.

Mrs. Bevins was born in Cayuga Co., N. Y.

Her parents came from England and moved to Kent Co., Mich., when she was 12 years old.

Mr. and Mrs. B. have had three children,—two girls and one boy.

They lost their first child, a girl, when she was only five weeks old.

They now have the two: the girl, Jessie M., is 13, and the boy, John W., 9 years old.

Mrs. B. is the Deputy Postmistress, and has attended the post office the most of the time for five or six years.

Ever since Mr. Bevins' advent into Osceola County he has been intimately identified with its growth and progress.

In every enterprise looking to the better development of the country, the material advancement of its wealth and the welfare of its people, he is ever to be found in the van.

Just such men are required to open up and settle a new country and develop its resources to the best advantage

While Mr. Bevins is enterprising, he is also cautious, safe and judicious in all undertakings, bringing to bear rare good judgment and business ability in carrying out any plan.

While serving himself and his family, he has also served his neighbors in various official capacities and always with that same devotion, earnestness and unselfishness he has served his own.

In public positions he has ever won the favor and good will of the people, as in private life he commands the respect and wins the esteem of all who are fortunate enough to know him.

As the subject of the foregoing brief biographical outline has proved himself a thorough representative of that class who rise in the world by adherence to good maxims, the publishers of this Album take especial pleasure in presenting his portrait in connection herewith, on the page preceding the commencement of this sketch.

John Lennon, farmer on section 25, Hartwick Township, and lumberman, was born August 16, 1837, in County Carrol, Ireland.

His parents emigrated to Montreal, when he was 11 years of age, in 1848.

His father dying a few years later, Mr. Lennon found himself at the head of the family, he being the oldest of 10 children deprived of a father's care.

He devoted his efforts to the discharge of the duty until he was 20 years of age, when he came to Michigan.

He became a lumberman at Mill Creek, St. Clair County, where he operated three years, going thence to Lapeer County, following the same pursuit until 1876, the date of his coming to Osceola County and to Hartwick Township.

He purchased 120 acres of land on sections 25 and 26, in a wholly wild condition, and later became the proprietor by purchase of a like quantity of land in addition.

He has cleared and improved 70 acres and erected excellent farm buildings.

The entire tract in his possession lies in a solid body.

He is a Prohibitionist in principle, and has served three years as Highway Commissioner.

The marriage of Mr. Lennon to Ellen J. McFarland took place at Goodwin, Lapeer Co., Mich., Jan. 27, 1861.

They have had 11 children—May J., Margaret L., Anna, Deborah, Nancy E., James, John, Grace, William and Florence.

One child died unnamed.

Mrs. Lennon was born Feb. 28, 1844, in Ontario.

Her father, Andrew McFarland, was a farmer in Lapeer County, where he died, in October, 1858.

She was 10 years old when her parents removed to Ontario from Quebec, and five years later they settled in Michigan.

 

George H. Gilbert, proprietor of the Gilbert House at Reed City, was born in Schuyler, Herkimer Co., N. Y., June 19, 1843.

His parents, Josiah and Tilda (Whitaker) Gilbert, were natives of the Empire State, and died there.

Mr. Gilbert, when about 14 years of age, began to operate as a buyer and shipper of cattle, in which he was engaged 11 successive years.

In July, 1862, he enlisted in Co. C, 121st N. Y. Vol. Inf., under Capt. Fish, and went to the front as Third Sergeant.

He was in the service until the close of the war, and was in the Army of the Potomac.

He was in the actions of the second Bull Run, Antietam, Cold Harbor, Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court-House, Cedar Creek, Crampton's Pass, Frederick City, Winchester, Petersburg, Fredericksburg, Sailor's Creek, or Oliver Mountain, and was present at the surrender of General Lee.

Mr. Gilbert was discharged as Orderly Sergeant, and returned to the State of New York and passed two years in the vicinity of the city of Utica, on a farm.

In the spring of 1867 he came to the village of Newaygo, in the county of the same name, and engaged in the meat business.

He officiated as manager of the Jarse House two years, and in 187 1 came to Reed City, where he bought a building site, removed the timber, literally "cleared the bush," erected a building and established a saloon and billiard-room.

In the following year he built the hotel which he is now managing.

It is 24 x 96 feet in extent, is two stories in height, with a basement, and has accommodations for an average of 40 guests.

His hotel was destroyed by fire the morning of Jan. 17, 1885.

Mr. Gilbert is a member of the order known as the Princes of the Orient, and also of the Odd Fellows.

Beside his hotel property he owns 90 feet of frontage on Slosson Street, with a barn, 80 acres of land in Mason County and 160 acres of land in Lake County.

He was married in Schuyler County, New York, August 27, 1866, to Amoretta Sterling and they have two children; Vara, born in January, 1870, in Newaygo; and Ira, born in July, 1879, in Reed City.

Mrs. Gilbert was born in August, 1844, in Schulyer, New York.

 

David J. Hood, Manager and Overseer of the County Poor Farm, located on section 28, Sylvan Township, was born in Crawford Co., Pa.

He was reared to the age of 18 years on his father's farm and attended the common schools.

On attaining the age named he devoted his abilities to the acquisition of the carpenter's trade, following it as a vocation in Pennsylvania and Missouri until 1876, the year of his removal to Osceola County.

In August he came to Reed City and a few days later purchased of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Corporation a tract of land in Richmond Township containing 80 acres.

It was in an unimproved condition, and he has now 45 acres under the plow.

He took charge of the poor farm in Sylvan Township March 18, 1882.

He has succeeded in conducting its affairs with satisfaction to all concerned.

The occupants of the farm have numbered 17, the maximum.

There are eight persons now in his charge.

Politically, Mr. Hood is a Republican, with strong prohibition views.

He was married June 14, 1850, at Evansburg, Crawford Co., Pa., to Rosanna Stewart.

She was born in that place Aug. 16, 1831, where in former days her father was a merchant.

Later he removed to a farm where he passed the remaining days of his life.

Her mother died also in Crawford County.

Mrs. Hood was well educated and previous to her marriage engaged in teaching.

She has been the mother of 11 children:

J. Stewart is a manufacturer of pumps at Akron, Ohio.

Melbourn resides at Reed City.

Ellsworth lives at Rockford, Mich.

Margaret (Mrs. Hoover) lives at Chase, Mich.

Ray and Clyde reside at home.

Five are deceased,- Perida, Adelaide, an infant, Burton and Harry, the two last died at Reed City.

Mrs. Hood is a member of the Congregational Church at Reed City.

 

Warren A. Wagar, Supervisor of Sylvan Township and farmer on section 28, was born Aug. 17, 1840, in Yates Co., New York.

Charles Wagar, his father, was a native of the same Stale and followed the pursuit of agriculture in Yates County until his death, which occurred in 1841, within the first year of the life of his son.

His mother, Sophronia (Wier) Wagar, is a native of New York, and is now a resident of Wayne County in that State, and is aged 67 years.

After the death of Mr. Wagar she again married.

Warren was a member of his mother's family until he was 13 years of age, when he found a home with a young man named Gage.

Between three and four years later, he became an inmate of the household of Morgan Gage, father of his former patron, with whom he remained until he was 22 years of age, attending school and obtaining a knowledge of the builder's trade.

He was married Aug. 27, 1862, in Yates County, to Mary A. Green.

She was born in that county and died there in June, 1864, leaving one child, Charles, who was born Oct. 9, 1863.

The wife and mother when dying urged his speedy union with a friend to whose care she wished to entrust her infant child, and in accordance Mr. Wagar was married Feb. 16, 1865, to Jennie M. Van Liper.

She was born Nov. 9, 1845, in the State of New York, and is the daughter of Jeremiah Van Liper.

One child constitutes the issue of this marriage, Elnora, born Sept. 23. 1866.

After his marriage Mr. Wagar was occupied at his trade, which he pursued with success until 1877 in his native State.

In that year he concluded to seek a home in Michigan, which he did and made his location on the place where he now resides April 27, 1877.

He at first purchased 120 acres of land, to which he added five acres soon after.

Later, he sold 40 acres, and has about 20 acres of the remaining 85 acres under plow.

He is the owner of a half interest in 80 acres of pine land on section 24.

Politically he is a Democrat and has been Justice of the Peace two years and is the present incumbent.