SECOND AND THIRD INFANTRY.

Formation of the Second Infantry-Battle of Bull Run-In Kentucky-In Mississippi-Siege of Knoxville-Re-enlistment-Off to Virginia-The Campaign of the Wilderness-Muster out-Members from Barry County-Members from Allegan County-

The Third Infantry-Representation from Barry and Allegan Counties -

The Regiment at Bull Run-Steadiness of its Brigade-Praise of the New York Tribune-Winter-Quarters-Gallantry at Williamsburg-At Fair Oaks-Prince de Joinville's EncomiumThrough the Seven Days' Fight-Second Bull Run-At Chancellorsville-At Gettysburg-Sent to New York-Back to Virginia The Mine Run Campaign-In the Wilderness and Subsequent Fights-Non-Veterans sent Home-Veterans and Recruits formed into a Battalion-Consolidated with the Fifth Infantry —Call for Men in July, 1864-Raising the New Third Infantry-It goes to Alabama-Back to Murfreesboro'-Depots-Faulkner's Brigade The Regiment goes to Texas in 1865-Stays there till 1866-Mustered out in May-Barry County Officers and Soldiers-Allegan County Officers and Soldiers.

SECOND INFANTRY.

THE Second Regiment of Michigan Volunteer Infantry, the first three years' regiment to take the field from that a During the civil war Allegan County received credit for twenty-one hundred and seventy-five men, and Barry for sixteen hundred and twenty-seven.

This is more than can be found in the reports of the adjutant-general of the State, but the discrepancy is principally due to the fact that re enlisting veterans were credited to the county twice, while their names appear in the reports but once.

A number of men, also, served in the navy whose names do not appear in the reports.

The credits also include those drafted men who, in the first months of the draft, were allowed to pay three hundred dollars each in lieu of personal service, though of course they are not represented on any rolls.

A few names were also, doubtless, omitted from the reports, in spite of the energy and fidelity of Adjt.-Gen. Robertson, on Second and Third Infantry rendezvoused at Detroit, and was mustered into the United States service May 25, 1861.

With an aggregate force on its muster-rolls of one thousand and thirteen men, commanded by the brave Col. Israel B. Richardson, it left Detroit, June 5, 1861, and at once proceeded to the seat of war on the Potomac.

The Second participated in the first battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861, and was one of the few regiments that did not become thoroughly demoralized as a result of that engagement (see history of the Third Infantry).

From that time until March, 1863, it shared in all the victories and defeats of the Union arms in Virginia.

It was then transferred to Kentucky, where it remained until June, when, with Gen. Parke's division of the Ninth Army Corps, it reinforced Gen. Grant at Vicksburg.

With Sherman at Jackson, Miss., it lost heavily.

From Mississippi it re-returned to Kentucky, and in September, 1863, marched via Cumberland Gap to Knoxville, Tenn., where, under Gen. Burnside, it took part in all of the severe fighting incident to the siege of Knoxville, losing one-half its effective strength.

A large number of its remaining men re-enlisted in December, 1863, and returned home on furlough.

From Mount Clemens, Michigan, the regiment returned to Virginia in May, 1864, arriving in time to plunge into the Wilderness and bear its share on that hotly-contested field.

Thereafter, at Spottsylvania, Bethesda Church, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, and in all the other principal engagements which culminated at Appomattox, the Second was an active participant.

It was mustered out of service at Delaney House, D. C., July 28, 1865, and arrived at Detroit, Michigan, for final pay and disbandment, August 1st of the same year.

MEMBERS OF THE SECOND INFANTRY FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company B.

Henry D. Thompson, discharged for disability, Sept. 16, 1862.

Company C.

William G. Fox, Wounded 5/5/1862 Williamsburg, VA, discharged for disability, Oct. 2, 1862.

Royal G. Rice, discharged at end of service, July 21, 1864. After the War he lived in Dowling, Mich

Charles I. Robinson, discharged at end of service, Jan. 26, 1865.

George Rogers, missing in action at Jackson, Miss., July 11, 1863. Wounded 7/11/1863 Jackson, MS (Severe wound in left leg, amputated)

Samuel R. Wilson, discharged for disability, Feb. 3, 1865.

Company D.

William Scudder, discharged at end of service, Feb. 10, 1864.

Wounded 7/11/1863 Jackson, MS http://www.fadedfootsteps.net/veterans/profile/4071/private-william-m-scudder-company-d-2nd-michigan-infantry-us-us-union-army.html

Company K.

Moses Boyden, discharged at end of service, Jan. 7, 1864.

Thomas M. Ellsworth, discharged at end of service, Nov. 16, 1863.

Estes Rorke, discharged at end of service, Nov. 10, 1863. Wounded 7/11/1863 Jackson, MS

John C. Stewart, discharged at end of service, Jan. 7, 1864. After the War he lived in Stanton, MI

ALLEGAN COUNTY SOLDIERS IN THE SECOND INFANTRY.

Company I.

David S. Buck, missing in action at Savage Station, Va., June 29, 1862.

Martin Crane, veteran, Dec. 31, 1863; missing in action near Petersburg, Va., Oct. 27, 1864.

James Carruthers, discharged at end of service, June 22, 1864.

Clark Conrad, veteran, enlisted Dec. 31, 1863.

George B. Myers, discharged at end of service, June 22, 1864.

Nathan A. Tanner, died of wounds at Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct. 11, 1863.

George P. West, discharged for disability.

Company K.

Alfonso Crane, died of disease at Jackson, Miss., July 11, 1863.

THIRD INFANTRY.

The Third Regiment of infantry, which was recruited during the month of May, 1861, was mainly from the counties of Allegan, Barry, Clinton, Easton, Gratiot, Ionia, Kent, Muskegon, Mecosta, Montcalm, Newaygo, and Ottawa and had its rendezvous at Grand Rapids.

It was the first regiment organized in this portion of the State, the second mustered for three years, and the third to take the field from Michigan.

Barry County was represented by about a hundred and fifty men scattered through all its companies except I, while Allegan's representation was divided among companies A, C, E, F, I, and K.

Having upon its muster-rolls the names of one thousand and forty officers and enlisted men, the regiment left Grand Rapids on the 13th of June, 1861, and proceeded directly to the seat of war on the Potomac.

It was soon after assigned to the brigade commanded by Col. Israel B. Richardson, and first met the enemy at Blackburn's Ford, Va., July 18, 1861.

Three days later Richardson's brigade was engaged in that famous conflict, the first battle of Bull Run.

To show that the Michigan regiments then and there gave evidence of the material composing them, we need but cite the New York Tribune's account of that battle, from which the following is an extract:

" I was told that a few regiments besides the three faithful ones of Blenker's brigade had come in fair order, and that they were the Second and Third Michigan and the Massachusetts First, of Richardson's brigade.

“Gen. McDowell also stated that “Richardson’s troops were the last to leave the field."

When the defeated and almost disbanded Union army fell back on Washington, Richardson's brigade served as rear-guard.

It maintained its position at Centreville Heights until the morning of July 22d, and when all detachments and stragglers had passed to the rear, it deliberately took up the line of march to Washington, where it arrived in perfect order.

To this brigade was then assigned the duty of guarding Bailey's Cross-Roads and picketing other highways leading from Rebeldom to Alexandria and Washington.

After I account of the apathy or ignorance of the regimental and company officers.

In the preparation of the sketches of the services of the regiments great care has been taken to make them —although necessarily brief -as correct and interesting as possible.

The adjutant-general's reports and the "Red Book of Michigan" have been closely examined, surviving soldiers of the various regiments have been consulted, and in many cases items have been added derived from the personal information of the gentleman who, under the direction of the general historian, compiled these military sketches.

That gentleman, Mr. J. S. Schenck, was formerly adjutant of the Sixteenth Illinois, and served nearly three years side by side with several of the Michigan regiments whose exploits he has here narrated.

It is intended that the sketches of the various regiments shall bear some proportion as to size to the number of men from these two counties in them.

It may be proper to add here that during the Mexican war Samuel Brown, Jr., Henry Starring, Franklin H. Heath, Silas S. Price, and Chester Ross, of Allegan County, served in Captain F. W. Curtenius' company in the First Michigan Infantry of that period; the two men last named dying in the service. C. J. * Col. Richardson was a native of Vermont, and a graduate of West Point.

He served in the Mexican war, and attained the rank of major.

He was made brigadier-general of volunteers in September, 1861, promoted to the rank of major-general soon after, and met his death at the battle of Antietam, Sept; 17, 1862, while commanding a division.

This number represents all who served in both the first and second terms of service.

The Third Infantry assisted in the construction of the defenses of Washington, the Third went into winter-quarters near Alexandria, Va., where it remained until March, 1862.

Then the Third Michigan Infantry moved with McClellan's army to the Peninsula.

At the battle of Williamsburg, the Third fought on the 5th of May, 1862.

The Third Infantry then with Berry's brigade of Kearney's division moved, through mud and rain, to the front at double-quick.

Here the Third Michigan Infantry formed line under fire, and, immediately charging a superior force of the enemy, recaptured a lost position and artillery, and did not stop until the enemy was dislodged and beat back from his own position to the plains below.

In regard to this fight, a Tribune correspondent said:

"By confessions of rebel prisoners, eight hundred of Berry's men, mostly of Michigan regiments, drove back sixteen hundred of the enemy."

At Fair Oaks, on the 31st of May. the Third particularly distinguished itself.

Its commander, Col. Stephen G. Champlin, was severely wounded, and the gallant Captain Samuel A. Judd was killed.

The total losses of the regiment in this action were thirty men killed, one hundred and twenty-four wounded, and fifteen missing.

The Prince de Joinville, an eye-witness of this battle, said:

"As at Williamsburg, Kearney comes to re-establish the fight.

Berry's brigade of this division, composed of Michigan regiments and an Irish battalion, advanced as firm as a wall into the midst of the disordered mass which wanders over the battle-field, and does more by its example than the most powerful reinforcement.

“The Third was also engaged at Savage Station and Peach Orchard, June 29, 1862; Glendale (or Charles City CrossRoads), June 30th; Malvern Hill, July 1st; and Groveton (or Second Bull Run), Aug. 29, 1862.

In the latter battle it lost twenty men killed, besides a large number wounded and missing. Proceeding from Edward's Ferry, Md., via Warrenton and Falmouth, Va., to Fredericksburg, Va., the regiment was engaged at the latter place Dec. 13, 1862, losing nine men wounded.

At Chancellorsville, on the 1st, 2d, and 3d of May, 1863, it sustained a loss of sixty-three men, killed, wounded, and missing.

On the 11th of June the regiment began a toilsome march via Centreville, Va., Edward's Ferry, and Frederick City, Md., to Gettysburg, Pa.

The roads were dusty, the heat was intense, and the men suffered terribly.

At Gettysburg, on the 2d and 3d days of July, 1863, the Third again dealt staggering blows to the cohorts of treason, sustaining a loss on its side of forty-one men, killed, wounded, and missing.

Having followed the enemy to Williamsport, it marched thence to Harper's Ferry, crossed the Potomac at that point, and moved forward to Manassas Gap.

On the 17th of August, 1863, the regiment proceeded to Alexandria, Va., and from there to New York City, whither it had been ordered to aid in the preservation of the public peace and the keeping down of a mob during the then pending draft.

Remaining there some days, it proceeded up the Hudson to Troy, N. Y., where it was stationed two weeks.

The Third Michigan Infantry then returned to its brigade in the Army of the Potomac, arriving at Culpepper, Va., Sept. 17, 1863.

On the 26th of November, 1863, the regiment took part in the Mine Run campaign, engaging the enemy on the 27th at Locust Grove, and on the. 30th at Mine Run.

With the army it returned to Brandy Station December 2d, having lost during the movement thirty-one men in killed, wounded, and missing.

One hundred and eighty members of the regiment reenlisted as veterans Dec. 23, 1863.

They received a thirty days' furlough, and at the expiration of that time returned to their command.

From December, 1863, until the beginning of May, 1864, a season of inactivity prevailed.

On the 4th of the latter month the Third crossed the Rapidan at Ely's Ford, advanced to Chancellorsville, and during the three following days was in the midst of the terrific battle of the Wilderness, sustaining a heavy loss.

It was also engaged at Todd's Tavern on the 8th and at Spottsylvania on the 12th, where it participated in the successful charge of the Second Army Corps.

At the North Anna River it again encountered the enemy, May 23d and 24th.

The Pamunky River was crossed on the 27th, and the advance continued toward Cold Harbor.

During this month of continuous fighting the regiment sustained a loss of thirty-one men killed, one hundred and nineteen wounded, and twenty-nine missing.

At Cold Harbor, on the 9th of June, 1864, the regiment, with the exception of the re-enlisted men and such as had joined since the original organization, and certain designated officers, was ordered home for the purpose of being discharged.

The remaining officers and men-some three hundred and fifty in number-were formed into a battalion of four companies, and attached to the Fifth Michigan Infantry.

The order consolidating these regiments was confirmed by the War Department June 13th, and on the 20th day of June, 1864, the old Third, which had been one of the first to take the field in defense of the government, was formally mustered out of the United States service.

THIRD INFANTRY (NEW).

In addition to the hundreds of thousands gone before, on the 18th of July, 1864, the President issued his proclamation calling upon the loyal States for five hundred thousand more men.

Volunteers from the several States were to be accepted for one, two, and three years, as they elected.

Michigan's quota under this call was more than eighteen thousand, of which twelve thousand had to be recruited or drafted.

Governor Blair determined to raise six new regiments of infantry, viz., the Third, Fourth, Twenty-eighth, Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, and Thirty-first, or one in each Congressional district, and in pursuance of this plan issued his proclamation on the 21st of July, 1864.

On the 29th of the same month orders were issued to reorganize the Third Infantry, and to Col. Moses B. Houghton (formerly lieutenant-colonel of the old organization) was entrusted the charge of raising the new regiment.

Grand Rapids was named its place of rendezvous, and the Fourth District its field for recruiting.

The exigencies of the service did not permit the complete organization of all these regiments before the enforcement of the impending draft (Sept. 5, 1864), and seven companies, which had been raised for the Thirtieth at * Composed of the Second, Third, and Fifth Michigan, and a New York regiment.

The Third, thus reinforced, completed its organization at once (October 15th), and, being mustered in with eight hundred and seventy-nine officers and men, left camp for Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 20, 1864, going thence to Decatur, Ala.

It remained at Decatur-having meanwhile a skirmish with the enemy at that point-until November 25th, when it was transferred to Murfreesboro, Tenn., and ordered to duty at Fort Rosecrans.

On the 7th of December, while Gen. Milroy was engaged at the Cedars with the principal part of Forrest's rebel command, Faulkner's rebel brigade of mounted infantry made a dash on the picket-line at Murfreesboro, drove in the guard, and gained possession of the town.

After a spirited engagement of an hour's duration, four companies of the Third, together with an equal number of companies of the One Hundred and Eighty-first Ohio, with a section of artillery, repulsed the rebels and pursued them two miles.

The regiment remained at Murfreesboro and its vicinity until Jan. 16, 1865, when it was moved to Huntsville, Ala., and assigned to the Fourth Army Corps.

On the 31st of January it was ordered to Eastport, Miss., and proceeded as far as Nashville, Tenn., when, the order being countermanded, it returned to Huntsville, remaining there until the middle of March.

With its brigade it then marched to East Tennessee, occupying successively positions at New Market, Bull Gap, and Jonesboro', where it was employed in pursuing, capturing, and driving off the numerous guerrilla bands infesting that region.

The Third was ordered to Nashville, Tenn., on the 20th of March, arrived there the 28th, and on the 15th of June, 1865, with its corps, proceeded by rail from Nashville to Johnsville, Tenn.; thence by steamers down the Tennessee, Ohio, and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans, arriving on the 5th of July.

After a short delay the regiment proceeded in vessels to Indianola, Texas, and thence it marched to Green Lake.

On the 12th of September it started out for Westerin Texas, and, after a fatiguing march of fourteen days' duration, it reached San Antonio.

During the following winter two companies were on duty at Gonzales.

Early in the spring of 1866 the entire regiment was ordered to Victoria, Texas, and was there mustered out of the service, May 26, 1866.

Marching to Indianola, it took steamers to New Orleans, going thence via the Mississippi River to Cairo, Ill., whence it was transported by railway to Detroit, Michigan.

It arrived there June 10, 1866, and was soon after paid off and discharged.

BARRY COUNTY OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS WHO SERVED IN THE THIRD INFANTRY (FIRST TERM).

Non-Commissioned Staff.

Sergeant-Major Israel S. Geer, enlisted June 10, 1861; promoted to 2d Lieutenant, Co. C, Aug. 1, 1861.

Company B.

John Goff, mustered out July 5, 1865.

Willard Main, mustered out July 9, 1865.

Robert Strong, mustered out May 19, 1865.

Company C.

Captain Israel S. Geer, com. Dec. 26, 1861; wounded and taken prisoner at Wilderness, May 6, 1864; mustered out Sept. 21, 1864.

Jacob T. Bipley, died of disease at Andersonville prison, Ga., July 12, 1864.

Jacob Broepphe, missing at Mine Run, Va., Nov. 30, 1863.

Christian Fostler, transferred to 5th lrf., June 10, 1864.

Lewis Ruthardt, discharged for disability, May 1, 1864.

Company D.

John Winebremer, transferred to 5th Inf., June 10, 1864.

Company E.

Sergeant Andrew Nickerson, Hastings; enlisted June 10, 1861; promoted to 2d Lieutenant, Co. H, Aug. 5, 1862.

Musician James L. Reed, discharged May 24, 1862.

Mathew Bain, discl. for disability.

George W. Btgl)ee, discharged for disability, Feb. 17, 1865.

James G. Birdsall, discharged by order, Sept. 1, 1863.

Cornelius Barkluff.

Alonzo H. Bennett, mustered out May 30, 1865. Thomas Burke, mustered out May 27, 1865.

Daniel E. Birdsall, veteran, enlisted Dec. 23, 1863.

Samuel B. Cook, discharged for disability. George Decker, mustered out June 28, 1865.

Washington Feriis, discharged for disability.

D. W. Foster, died of wounds at Portland, June 17, 1862.

Franklin Green, transferred to 5th Inf.

Emmett A. Hamilton, died of wounds at Groveton, Va, Aug. 29, 1862.

George H. Hill, died in action at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Ralph IHenley, veteran, enlisted Dec. 23, 1863.

Andrew J. Jordan, mustered out May 17, 1865.

John A. Kellogg, veteran, enlisted Dec. 23, 1863; mustered out July 5, 1865.

Andrew G. Kilpatrick, veteran, enlisted Dec. 23, 1863.

James Kilpatrick, discharged for disability, Sept. 30, 1862.

David C. Leach, mustered out July 5, 1865.

Samuel McMurray, veteran, enlisted Dec. 23, 1863.

Dwight T. Merrill, mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. John B. Osgood, mustered out July 5, 1865.

William Paustle, discharged from Vet. Res. Corps, July 28, 1865.

Merrick D. Reed, veteran, enlisted Dec. 23, 1863.

Daniel A. Randall, transferred to 5th Michigan Inf.

Truman Sawdy, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 26, 1863.

Martin M. Sweet, transferred to 5th Michigan Inf.

Joseph E. Sutton, discharged at end of service, Nov. 10, 1863.

Simeon C. Stanton, mustered out July 5, 1865.

Edward Stevens, mustered out July 5, 1865.

Truman J. Wisner, transferred to 5th Michigan Inf.

Company F.

James R. Dexter, discharged for disability, Aug. 8, 1861.

Samuel S. Garrison, discharged at end of service, June 20, 1864.

John Oberly, discharged for disability, Jan. 14, 1863.

Timothy Penders, discharged for disability, Nov. 12, 1863.

Ephraim Parsons, mustered out May 8, 1865.

Owen F. Palmer, veteran, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863.

Isaac Walker, ditch. for disability, Feb. 7, 1863.

Company G.

Captain Abram J. Whitney, Hastings; com. 2d Lieutenant, Co. I, May 13, 1861; promoted to 1st liout. Aug. 1, 1861; Captain, June 9, 1862; resigned Sept. 26, 1862.

Company H.

2d Lient. Andrew Nickerson, com. Aug. 5, 1862; promoted to slt Lieutenant, Co. K, Oct. 20, 1862.

Aaron E. Dupee, discharged at end of service, Nov. 10, 1863.

James F. Dibble, discharged at end of service, Nov. 10, 1863.

Jeremiah Sanders, discharged at end of service, Nov. 10, 1863.

Company K.

Captain Andrew Nickerson, Hastings; com. Nov. 1, 1863; 1st Lieutenant, Oct. 20, 1862; killed in action at Wilderness, May 6, 1864.

Corp. Edwin H. Mallory, enlisted June 10, 1861; discharged at end of service, June 20, 1864.

Wagoner Isaac D. Reed, enlisted June 10, 1861; discharged at end of service, June 20, 1864.

Edward Bugbee, died of disease at Yorktown, May 3, 1862.

William Buck, discharged for disability, Dec. 4, 1862.

Henry II. Bailey, discharged at end of service, June 20, 1864.

Austin Dibble, discharged for disability, July 18, 1862.

Charles W. Feber, discharged at end of service, June 17, 1864.

Oscar Gaines, discharged to enlist in regular service, Dec. 17, 1862.

Jonathan Kellogg, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 15, 1864.

Jonathan Kelly, transferred to Vet. Res Corps.

Orange McClure, veteran, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863.

Mortimer Millard, discharged at end of service, June 20, 1864.

Lorenzo W. Payne, discharged for disability, Jan. 9, 1863.

Jacob S. Pickle, died of disease at Washington, D. C., Sept. 17, 1861.

William Parrish, mustered out July 5, 1865.

Henian Parrish, veteran, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863.

Cody M. Reed, discharged to enlist in regular service, Nov. 29, 1862.

Alfred H. Slocum, discharged for disability, June 20, 1862.

Charles H. Sanford, died in action at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863.

Warren Wilkinson, discharged at end of service, June 20, 1864.

ALLEGAN COUNTY MEMBERS OF THE THIRD INFANTRY (FIRST TERM).

Company A.

Captain Milton Leonard, com. 1st Lieutenant Nov. 1, 1863; 2d Lieutenant Feb. 5, 1863; died in action at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.

Company C.

Musician John B. Champion, discharged Feb. 28, 1862.

Theo. Castor, transferred to 5th Inf., June 10, 1864; mustered out Sept. 4, 1865.

Christian Pleigden, discharged for disability, Nov. 20, 1861.

John P. Scheidt, discharged for disability, Nov. 20, 1861.

Valentin Schaeffer, discharged for disability, June 20, 1861.

Anton Steffles, discharged for disability, Feb. 23, 1862. Thomas Schneider, died of disease at Baltimore, July 19, 1863.

Jos. A. Schuler, discharged at end of service, June 20, 1864. Peter Wagner, discharged for disability, Oct. 1, 1861.

Company E.

Edward T. Webster, died in action at Wilderness, May 6, 1864. Harvey Wilson, discharged for disability, July 29, 1861.

Samuel F. Woolman, died May 30, 1864, of wounds.

Company F.

2d Lieutenant Milton Leonard, transferred 2d Lieutenant from Co. A, May 1, 1863; promoted to 1st Lieutenant, Co. A, Nov. 1, 1863.

Musician Edward C. Wheelock, veteran, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863; mustered out July 5, 1865.

Geo. W. Bailey, discharged at end of service, June 20, 1864.

Harvey S. Briggs, veteran, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863; transferred to 5th Inf.; mustered out July 5, 1865. J

ohn Calkins, discharged at end of service, June 20, 1864.

John Hefner, veteran, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863; transferred to 5th Inf.; mustered out July 5, 1865.

Martin Jones, veteran, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863; transferred to 5th Inf.; mustered out July 5, 1865.

Daniel G. Slade, discharged for disability, Nov. 20, 1861.

Company I.

Wm. H. Campion, discharged for disability, November, 1862.

Nelson J. Davis, died in action at Seven Pines, Va., May 31, 1862.

Edward R. Goble, died in action at Seven Pines, Va., May 31, 1862.

Sylvester Gay, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, July 1, 1864.

Alfred M. Gardner, discharged for disability, Dec. 31, 1862.

Perry Goshom, discharged for disability, Nov. 17, 1862.

Josiah E. Huff, died of disease, Nov. 18, 1861.

Lonson Hill, died in action at Seven Pines, Va., May 31, 1862.

Albert Hamlin, discharged for disability, Nov. 21, 1862.

Calvin Hall, veteran, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863; mustered out July 5, 1865.

Jerome Kibbee, discharged for disability, Dec. 9, 1862.

John McDonald, discharged for disability, Oct. 1, 1863.

Joseph L. Paney, discharged at end of service, June 20, 1864.

Jas. Reeves, discharged for disability, Aug. 7, 1862.

John Simpkins, died in action at Seven Pines, Va., May 31, 1862.

Willard Sweet, veteran, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863; transferred to 5th Inf.; mustered out July 5, 1865.

Company K.

John Felton, died in action at Wilderness, May 6, 1864.

Win. H. Harvey, transferred to 5th Inf.; mustered out June 8, 1865.

Edwin Nickerson, transferred to 5th Inf.; mustered out June 9, 1865.

MEMBERS FROM BARRY COUNTY IN THE REORGANIZED THIRD INFANTRY.

Field and Staff and Non-Commissioned Staff.

Asst. Surg. Philo H. Drake, Hastings; com. Nov. 24, 1864; res. June 20, 1865.

Sergeant-Maj. Geo. W. Sheldon, promoted to 2d Lieutenant May 19, 1865; mustered out May 25, 1866.

Company A.

Francis Rogers, mustered out Aug. 5, 1865.

Company B.

Charles Tichenor, discharged at end of service, March 18, 1866.

Company C.

Corp. Vine E. Welch, Barry; enlisted Sept. 3, 1864; transferred to Co. F.

Richard D. Hudson, mustered out May 23, 1865.

Company D.

Captain Washington K. Ferris, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 10, 1864; res. March 12, 1865.

Corp. Jacob Rhodes, Baltimore; enlisted Aug. 26, 1861.

Corp. James Marvin, Johnstown; enlisted Aug. 17, 1861; mustered out May 25, 1866.

Barry Baulch, mustered out Aug. 5, 1865.

Thomas Boggart, mustered out Nov. 6, 1865.

John H. Day, mustered out June 12, 1866.

Simon Eberly, mustered out Aug. 17, 1865.

David L. Fereter, mustered out Aug. 11, 1865.

Benjamin G. Foster, mustered out May 26, 1866.

John A. Harrington, mustered out Aug. 5, 1865.

Leonard M. Hyde, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Bayliss T. Sweezy, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., June 16, 1865.

Anthony B. Wisner, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., April 17, 1865.

Philip A. West, mustered out July 11, 1865.

William H. Watts, mustered out May 2.5, 1866.

Company E.

Captain Reuben P. Lamb, Prairieville; com. July 28, 1864; res. May 12, 1865.

1st Lieutenant Albert H. Ellis, Hastings; cornm. July 29, 1864; hon. discharged, May 15, 1865.

Sergeant Samuel M. Tripp, Prairieville; enlisted Aug. 17, 1864; discharged by order, May 3, 1865.

Sergeant Edwin King, Prairieville; enlisted July 25, 1864; mustered out May 26, 1866.

Sergeant John T. Shelp, Prairieville; enlisted Aug. 17, 1864; discharged by order, April 16, 1866.

Sergeant Henry M. Merritt, Hastings; enlisted Aug. 5, 1864; discharged by order, July 3, 1865.

Sergeant John White, Prairieville; enlisted July 25, 1864; mustered out May 25, 1866.

Corp. James N. Collister, Prairieville; enlisted Aug. 18, 1864; discharged July 12, 1865.

Corp. Samuel Lamb, Prairieville; enlisted July 25, 1864; discharged May 17, 1865.

Corp. Robert Frost, Woodland; enlisted Sept. 3, 1864; discharged by order, July 25, 1865.

Corp. John H. Freeman, Prairieville; enlisted July 28, 1864; discharged by order, Sept. 5, 1865.

Corp. William Wickham, Woodland; enlisted Aug. 30, 1864; discharged by order, Sept. 5, 1865.

Corp. William Scudder, Prairieville; enlisted Aug. 19, 1861; absent sick at muster out.

William Atwood, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., June 30, 1865.

C. J. Brown, discharged at end of service, March 2, 1866.

Joseph Barnes, mustered out Aug. 10, 1865.

Eugene A. Beach, mustered out May 25, 1866.

Lewis S. Campbell, mustered out from Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 12, 1865.

David F. Campbell, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 10, 1865.

Fabrius Deplanta, mustered out Sept. 25, 1865.

Jacob Frink, mustered out May 25, 1866.

Stephen Heath, mustered out July 24, 1864.

Stephen Haight, mustered out Oct. 6, 1865.

Benjamin Hass, mustered out Sept. 4, 1865.

William N. Haight, died of disease at Louisville, Ky., December, 1864.

Conrad Kehler, discharged at end of service, March 2, 1866.

Seth Lovell, mustered out July 15, 1865.

William J. McArthur, mustered out May 25, 1866.

John H. McArthur, mustered out May 25, 1866.

William Myers, mustered out Sept. 28, 1865.

William Mills, mustered out May 25, 1866.

Alpheus F. Morse, mustered out July 13, 1865.

James Myers, mustered out Sept. 9, 1865.

Samuel M. Martin, mustered out June 13, 1865.

William McNeil, discharged at end of service, March 2, 1866.

William Nichols, mustered out March 3, 1866.

Oliver P. Nichols, mustered out May 25, 1866.

Nelson H. Orr, mustered out April 16, 1866.

Charles W. Pickle, mustered out May 25, 1866.

Willis Peck, mustered out Sept. 5, 1865,

Samuel A. Phillips, discharged at end of service, May 2, 1866.

Andrew Smith, mustered out May 25, 1866.

David Sisco, mustered out May 25, 1866.

John E. Spaulding, mustered out Sept. 28, 1865.

Gilbert Van Brunt, died of disease at Louisville, Ky., April 19, 1865.

Sidney J. Wiley, mustered out May 25, 1866.

Company F.

Corp. George S. Ward, Barry; enlisted March 2, 1865; mustered out March 2, 1866.

Lewis S. Campbell, mustered out from Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 12, 1865.

Philip Ragle, mustered out June 18, 1865.

Allegan County had no credited representatives in the new regiment.

SIXTH AND SEVENTH INFANTRY.

Formation of the Sixth Infantry-"The Peculiar Regiment"-The Allegan County Company-On Duty in Baltimore-By Ship to New Orleans-Sickness there-Services in Louisiana-Siege of Port Hudson-Converted into Heavy Artillery-Re-enlistment-Services in Arkansas-Reducing Mobile-Subsequent Services-Mustered out-Members from Allegan County-From Barry County Organization and Departure of the Seventh Infantry-Ball's Bluff -On the Peninsula-Second Bull Run and South Mountain-Terrible Fight at Antietam-Gallant Passage of the Rappahannock at Fredericksburg-Chancellorsville-The March to Gettysburg Hard Fight there-At New York-Re-enlistment-The Great Campaign of 1864 and 1865-Mustered out —The Barry County Members.

SIXTH INFANTRY.

This regiment was formed during the summer of 1861, having for its rendezvous the village of Kalamazoo.

It was afterwards organized as heavy artillery, and on account of its almost entire isolation from other Michigan regiments during its term of service, and of the fact that it served as both infantry and artillery as occasion required, it was denominated at State headquarters the “peculiar regiment of Michigan."

Allegan County had a large representation in its ranks.

Company G, which started for the front under the command of Captain Chauncey J. Bassett, was most emphatically an Allegan County company, and was the first entire command to leave that county's borders.

Bearing upon its rolls the names of nine hundred and forty-four officers and enlisted men, and commanded by Col. Frederick W. Curtenius, of Kalamazoo, a veteran of the Mexican war, the regiment left its rendezvous Aug. 30, 1861, and proceeded to Baltimore, Md., where it remained on duty for several months.

Early in March, 1862, it sailed for Ship Island, Miss., and from there in April proceeded to New Orleans, and was one of the first regiments to enter that city upon its surrender to Gen. Butler and Admiral Farragut.

On the 15th of May it sailed up the Mississippi, and was engaged in the battle at Baton Rouge on the 5th of June, and again at the same place on the 5th of August, losing on the latter day fifty-three men.

From Aug. 20, 1862, until December 6th, the regiment was stationed at Metairie Ridge, guarding one of the approaches to New Orleans.

This location was exceedingly unhealthy, and the command was so reduced that on the 6th of December, when it moved to New Orleans, only one hundred and ninety-one, out of an aggregate of seven hundred and fifty-five, were fit for duty; but the men soon recovered upon their arrival in the city.

In January, 1863, the regiment was with the expedition, under Gen. Weitzel, to Bayou Teche, which destroyed a rebel gunboat.

In the early part of February it was stationed a few miles out from New Orleans, and on the 23d of the month accompanied an expedition to Ponchatoula, where it had quite a sharp skirmish, losing two men Captain Bassett was commisioned major of a colored regiment in October, 1862.

He afterwards rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel in the same regiment, and was killed while in command of it, during the disastrous Red River campaign. Wounded.

On the 12th of May it made a raid on thy Jackson Railroad, destroying a camp at Tangipahoa, capturing sixty prisoners, and destroying property of the value of four hundred thousand dollars.

On the 21st of the month it embarked for Port Hudson, where it arrived on the 23d.

During the siege of this stronghold by Gen. Banks it was in an advanced position, and participated in the assaults of May 27th and June 14th, in which it lost severely.

On the 29th of June a detachment of thirty-five men formed the forlorn hope of an assaulting column which attacked the "citadel," but were driven back with a loss of eight killed and nine wounded.

By an order of Major-Gen. Banks, commanding the Department of the Gulf, issued on the 10th of July, following the surrender of Port Hudson, the Sixth was converted into a heavy artillery regiment, and on the 30th of the same month the order was approved by the Secretary of War.

The regiment was stationed at Port Hudson from the last-mentioned date until March 11, 1864, engaged in garrison duty.

At the latter date, the men having mostly re-enlisted as veterans, the command proceeded to Kalamazoo, Michigan, on a furlough of thirty days.

On the 11th of May it arrived at Port Hudson, with its ranks well filled by men recruited in Michigan.

On the 6th of June it was ordered to Morganza to serve as infantry, at which place it remained until the 24th, when it proceeded to Vicksburg, where it joined the engineer brigade.

On the 23d of July it was sent to the mouth of White River, Arkansas, and thence to St. Charles, in that State, where it was attached to a regiment of infantry.

A detachment of the regiment, while on a transport en route from Vicksburg to White River, was fired upon by a rebel battery, and lost two men killed and several wounded.

It remained but a short time at St. Charles, when it returned to Morganza, where it was for some time employed on engineer service, but subsequently was returned to duty as heavy artillery by the chief of artillery.

It was present at the surrender of Fort Morgan, Alabama, but not in time to participate in the bombardment.

On the 1st of October portions of the regiment were stationed at Forts Gaines and Morgan, in Mobile Bay.

On the 23d of December, 1864, five companies were detached for an expedition under Gen. Gordon Granger against Mobile, and were temporarily attached as infantry to the brigade of Gen. Bertram, with which they continued until Jan. 27, 1865, when they were returned to the regiment.

On the 31st of March, Companies A and K were detached from the command at Fort Morgan and ordered to report to Gen. Granger at the front, each being equipped with a battery of ten-inch mortars.

On their arrival they were placed in position under the guns of the Spanish Fort, where they did fine execution at fourteen hundred yards' range.

Upon the surrender of this fort the two companies manned and turned the captured guns, consisting of seven-inch Brooks rifles and one-hundred-pounder Parrotts, on the remaining rebel forts, Huger and Tracy, which soon after surrendered.

April 10th, Company B was placed on picket duty at Navy Cove, and Company E was assigned to duty in garrisoning Fort Powell.

Companies A and K rejoined the garrison at Fort Morgan, April 20th, and on the 9th of July the regiment was ordered to report to Gen. Sheridan at New Orleans, where it arrived on the 11th, and encamped at Greenville, four miles from the city.

At that place it was furnished with new camp-equipage and wagontrain, and placed under orders for Texas; but on the 5th of August orders were received for its muster out, which was completed on the 20th, and on the 30th it arrived at Jackson, Michigan, and on the 5th of September was paid and disbanded.

Its losses during the war were sixty-five men killed or died of wounds, and four hundred and fifty died of disease,-the heaviest loss by disease of any Michigan regiment during the war.

MEMBERS OF THE SIXTH INFANTRY FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Non- Commissioned Staff.

Com.-Sergeant Leander W. Leighton, enlisted Aug. 21, 1861; discharged for disability.

Hosp.-Stew. Geo. W. Moore, enlisted Aug. 21, 1861; promoted 1st Lieutenant 11th Regiment Col. Art'y, Aug. 6, 1863.

Drum-Msj. Danl. W. Marbell, enlisted Aug. 21, 1861; discharged for disability, March 30, 1862.

Company A.

Win. R. Ashcroft, mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Company B.

Clayton M. Carr, mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Company C.

Jefferson Brown, mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Wm. Gorman, mustered out Sept. 5, 1865.

Albert Pearsall, died of disease at New Orleans, La., Oct. 9, 1864.

Company E.

Geo. Nichols, mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Company G.

Captain Chauncey J. Bassett, Allegan; com. Aug. 19, 1861; promoted Major in Louisiana Regiment Col. Troops, Oct. 20, 1862.

Captain Henry Stark, Otsego; com. Oct. 21, 1862; 1st Lieutenant Aug. 20, 1861; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

1st Lieutenant Wm. H. White, Otsego; com. July 1, 1862; died of disease at Carrolton, La., Oct. 16, 1862.

1st Lieutenant Oscar Haire, Otsego; com. Oct. 21, 1862; enlisted as Sergeant Oct. 21, 1861; res. July 19, 1864.

2d Lieutenant Alfred C. Wa!lin, com. Aug. 21, 1861; res. June 30, 1862.

Sergeant Win. H. White, Otsego; enlisted Aug. 20, 1861; promoted 1st Lieutenant July 1, 1862.

Sergeant Jas. E. Garrison, enlisted Aug. 20, 1861; discharged for disability, June 26, 1864.

Jas. Stewart, enlisted Aug. 20, 1861; discharged for disability, Jan. 29, 1863.

Sergeant Sidney Ruuse, Otsego; enlisted Aug. 20, 1861; veteran, Feb. 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Corp. Richard W. Duncan, enlisted Aug. 20, 1861; killed at Port Hudson, June 30, 1863.

Corp. Alonzo H. Chandler, enlisted Aug. 20, 1861; discharged for disability.

Sergeant Geo. M. Guest, enl: Aug. 20, 1861; discharged by order, Sept. 28, 1863.

Corp. Walter Wood, discharged at end of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

Corp. Rodolplhus Symonds, died of disease at Port Hudson, July 23, 1863.

Corp. Geo. H. Hiarris, discharged Dec, 10, 1863.

Corp. John E. Hopper, discharged for disability, Feb. 19, 1863.

Musician Charles Bassett, died of disease, Nov. 10, 1861.

Musician Curtis Myers, discharged at end of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

Musician Warren Johnson, discharged for disability, Jan. 20, 1862.

Wagoner John P. Parish, discharged at end of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

Jas. Austin, died of disease at Fort Morgan, Ala., April 12, 1865.

Wm. Bailey, discharged for disability, Oct. 15, 1862.

Daniel Buskerk, discharged for disability, Jan. 20, 1862.

John Born, died in action at Baton Rouge, Aug. 5, 1862.

Jas. H. Booker, died in action at Port Hudson, May 27, 18a3.

John Bartlett, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Milo Baker, mustered out Aug. 20, 1865. Thomas Carey, died of disease at New Orleans, Aug. 15, 1862.

Elijah Crane, died of wounds at Port Hudson, May 28, 1863.

Richard L. Darling, died of disease, June 28, 1862.

Frederick Dailey, died of disease at Port Hudson, Aug. 24, 1863.

Geo. W. Dailey, discharged at end of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

Carlos E. Dexter, discharged for disability, June 5, 1863.

Enoch S. Dexter, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Jas. W. Edwards, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Lewis Eggleston, died of disease, May 28, 1862.

Terry C. Fuller, died of disease at Port Hudson, Aug. 26, 1862.

Geo. W. Frank, discharged at end of service, Aug. 2:3, 1864.

Bevj. Fry, discharged at end of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

James Frew, discharged at end of service, Aug 2:3, 1864.

David C. Frew, discharged by order, April 26, 1864.

William Frew, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Joseph W. Fay, missing in action. Jennings Goring, died of disease, Nov. 18, 1861.

IHenry Guest, discharged by order, July 25, 1865.

Abram E. Garrison, discharged by order, Oct. 8, 1863.

Miles Horn, discharged for disability, June 30, 1862.

Edward Haumer, discharged at end of service, Feb. 20, 1865.

Robert Harrison, died of wounds, July 1, 1863.

Freeman Hudden, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Francis M. Hurd, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Almos J. Jackson, discharged at end of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

William Kerns, discharged for disability, April 10, 1862.

John J. Kennison, dis(ch. for disability, Aug. 1, 1862.

J. E. Kennison, discharged by order, Feb. 26, 18C4.

William Kidder, died of wounds at Port Hudson, May 28,18C3.

Luke Maloy, died of wounds at Port Hudson, May 28, 1863.

Homer Mankus, died of disease at Vicksburg, July 12, 1864.

William Marshall, died of disease, Sept. 16, 1862.

Henry Marble, died of disease, Oct. 24, 1862.

Leonard Minard, discharged for disability, Dec. 10, 1861.

John J. Maine, discl. for disability, Jan. 30, 1864.

Solomon McBride, mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

John McBride, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Ebenezer G. Murma, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Robert H. Norris, (lied of disease at New Orleans, La., Jan. 5, 1863.

George Newton, discharged for disability, Oct. 3, 1863.

Oliver Potts, discharged for disability, Api il 9, 1862.

William H. Parish, discharged for disability, April 11, 1862.

Curtis Z. Pratt, discli. by order, Oct. 8, 1863.

Silas Pratt, died of disease.

Charles Parkhurst, died of disease at Carrollton, La., Feb. 11, 1863.

Robert Payne, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Charles E. Plummer, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out. Aug. 20, 1865.

William Ross, discharged tor disability, Dec. 10, 1861.

Leander Ross, discli. for disability, Aug. 1, 1862.

Orlando D. Rosenburg, discharged at eind of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

John Rollins, discli. at end of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

Riley Southwell, discharged for disability, Oct. 15, 1862.

Henry Southwell, discharged for disability, Dec. 26, 1862.

John B. Smith, discharged for disability, Aug. 1, 1862.

Enoch Simpson, discharged at end of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

Csborn Swaney, discharged at end of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

Hiram Sliriver, died of disease at Carrollton, La., Sept. 30, 1862.

George H. Starkweather, died of wounds, July 1, 1863.

Samuel Schrickengast, died of disease at Port Hudson, July 23, 1863.

Frank B. Seymour, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20. 1865.

Orvis Sweetland, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Charles Symonds, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

James C. Symonds, veteran, etl.March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Byron Teal, discharged for disability, Oct. 10, 1861.

John W. Van Lent, discli. for disability.

Peter Wyner, died of wounds at Baton Rouge, July 3, 1863.

Henry A. Wiltse, discharged at end of service, Aug. 23, 1864.

Brown Wynne, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Frank Whipple, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Theodore Weed, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

James Youlden, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Company I.

George M. Pardee, died of disease at Vicksburg, Sept. 25, 1864.

Company K.

Henry Ilixon, mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

BARRY COUNTY SOLDIERS IN THE SIXTH INFANTRY.

Non-Commissioned Staff.

Sergeant-Major George T. Griswold, Vermontville; promoted to 2d Lieutenant Co. H.

Company C.

Chauncey Boyce, discharged to enlist in regular service, Nov. 17, 1862.

William H. Burges-, discharged by order, May 18, 1865.'

G. P. Sterling, discharged to enlist ill regular service, Nov. 17, 1862.

Company G.

Samuel Russell, mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Company H.

1st Lieutenant Henry C. Baer, Castleton; com. March 7, 1865; 2d Lieutenant Dec. 2, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

2d Lieutenant George T. Griswold, Hastings; com. March 7, 1865; previously SergeantMajor; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Allen T. Baer, died of disease at Oak Hall, Va., Nov. 18, 1861.

Henry C. Baer, veteran, enlisted March 1, 1864.

Leander Cross, died of disease at New Orleans, La., Dec. 25, 1862.

John A. Gregg, veteran, enlisted Feb. 1, 1864; mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Ely Myers, died of disease at Natchez, Miss., May 18, 1862.

SEVENTH INFANTRY.

The Seventh Regiment of Infantry was recruited during the summer of 1861, and rendezvoused at Monroe.

It was mustered into the service for three years, August 22d, and, bearing upon its rolls the names of eight hundred and eighty-four officers and enlisted men, set out for Virginia, Sept. 5, 1861.

Arriving there, it was stationed on the upper Potomac.

It was one of the regiments detailed to go to Ball's Bluff, on the 21st of October, under Gen. Baker, and shared in the losses inflicted by the sudden and overwhelming attack of the enemy on that disastrous day.

In the spring of 1862 it proceeded with the Army of the Potomac to the Peninsula.

At Yorktown, West Point, Fair Oaks, and the "Seven Days' Fight," the Seventh was an active participant.

Retiring with the same army from the Peninsula, the enemy was again met at the second Bull Run, Aug. 30, 1862, and at South Mountain, September 14th.

Three days later it stood face to face with the foe at Antietam.

Here it was engaged in one of the most terrific struggles of the war, and bravely maintained itself throughout, though the victory it assisted to achieve was purchased at the cost of a list of killed and wounded embracing more than one-half of its force present in action.

After Antietam the Seventh continued with the Army of the Potomac, in its marches through Northern Virginia, until the 11th of December, 1862, when that army stood on the north side of the Rappahannock gazing across at the enemy's works at Fredericksburg.

During the night of the 10th the Union pontoniers had partially constructed a pontoon-bridge across the stream, but at daylight the rebel sharpshooters soon drove them away.

Volunteers were called for to cross the river and seize a foothold on the opposite shore.

Lieutenant-Col. Baxter, then in command, called on the Seventh for that duty, and as one man they responded to the call.

Foremost of all the army, they sprang into the boats and pulled for the opposite side.

The rebel bullets fell thick and fast among them and many were slain or wounded, among the latter being their gallant commander, but still they held on their way, and at length made good their landing.

Close behind them came a Massachusetts regiment.

The two formed on the bank, dashed up to the heights above, drove the enemy from his entrenchments, and captured several hundred prisoners at the point of the bayonet.

The bridge was then completed, and a portion of the army crossed in safety.

The subsequent disasters which befell the forces there assembled under Gen. Burnside cannot dim the glory gained by the Seventh Michigan Infantry in the execution of this brilliant exploit.

On the 3d of May, 1863, the regiment again crossed the Rappahannock to take part in the battle of Chancellorsville, but was not seriously engaged.

During the Gettysburg campaign the regiment under went more than the usual hardships of that dusty and torrid period.

On the 27th of June it marched thirty-seven miles, six on the 28th, and on the 29th thirty-two miles, making seventy-five in three days,-a remarkable exploit when it is considered that every soldier carried a rifle, bayonet, full cartridge-boxes, belts, blanket, haversack with three days' rations, and canteen, and that the marching in column in a cloud of dust is far more fatiguing than walking alone.

The Seventh arrived at Gettysburg on the 2d of July, and immediately went into battle on Cemetery Hill.

In this exposed position it remained until the close of the action, meeting and repelling some of the fiercest attacks of the enemy.

So much had the regiment been depleted by its previous conflicts that only fourteen officers and one hundred and fifty-one men went into this fight.

Of this small number twenty-one were killed (including the commander, Lieutenant-Col. Steele) and forty-four wounded, the total casualties being nearly half of the whole number engaged.

Shortly after the Gettysburg victory the regiment was ordered to New York City to assist in preserving order during the enforcement of the draft.

Returning to Virginia, it was engaged in skirmishing, marching, etc., until December 7th, when it went into winter-quarters at Barry's Hill.

Here one hundred and fifty-three men re-enlisted as veterans, and the regiment was sent home to recruit.

After thirty days' furlough it returned to Barry's Hill.

It remained there until the grand advance of the army took place, during the early days of May, 1864.

From that time until the collapse of the Rebellion was rendered certain by the surrender at Appomattox, the Seventh was ever found in the fore-front of battle.

In the campaign from May to November, 1864, it had lost forty-one men killed, one hundred and thirty-one wounded, thirty-six taken prisoners, and thirty reported as missing in action, some of whom were killed.

After the review at Washington, D. C., the regiment was ordered to Louisville, Ky., where it arrived June 23d.

It was mustered out of service at Jeffersonville, Ind., July 5th, and reached Jackson, Michigan, two days later, where it was paid off and disbanded.

BARRY COUNTY SOLDIERS WHO SERVED IN THE SEVENTH INFANTRY.

Company H.

Thomas Cromp, discharged by order, July 7, 1865.

Company I.

Captain Bezaleel W. Lovell, com. Aug. 22, 1861; res. Aug. 30, 1862.

Captain Elhanan C. Phetteplace, com. Sept. 2, 1862; 1st Lieutenant, Aug. 22, 1861; res. May 11, 1863.

Captain Samuel C. Ilodgman, comr. June 22, 1863; 1st Lieutenant, Sept. 2, 1862; 2d Lieutenant, Aug. 25, 1862; res. March 1, 1864.

Corp. Irving Rose, enlisted Aug. 22, 1861; discharged for disability, Dec. 6, 1862.

Musician P. B. Haman, enlisted Aug. 22, 1861; discharged April 10, 1863.

John B. Ashley, died of wounds at Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 2, 1862.

Orman Armstrong, discharged for disability, May 12, 1864.

Joshua Boorum, discharged for disability, April 14, 1863.

John Chapman, discharged for disability. Henry Cromp, discharged by order, July 28, 1865.

Lucius M. Cady, died at Savage's Station, June 30, 1862.

Wallace Evans, discharged July 23, 1862. Augustus M. Fonts, discharged for disability.

Andrew J. Forber, died in action at Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862.

Alonzo Fonts, died of disease at Bolivar, Md., about Dec. 1, 1862.

Joseph A. Kidder, died of disease at Camp Benton, Md., Dec. 29, 1861.

Caleb Kelly, discharged for disability, Sept. 2, 1862.

John H. McClelland, discharged for disability, June 30, 1862.

Thomas McLeod, discharged for disability, July 9, 1862. Philander Mead, mustered out July 5, 1865.

James Norton, died in action at Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862.

Charles H. Palmer, died of disease at Fort Monroe, May 3, 1862.

Nathaniel S. Pangburn, discharged for disability, March 4, 1863. Xylar Sweet, discharged Nov. 15, 1862.

Charles Scoby, veteran, enlisted Dec. 18, 1863; mustered out July 5, 1865.

James M. Travis, died of wounds at Frederick, Md., Oct. 10, 1862.

Henry M. Taylor, discharged May 30, 1862.

Henry L. Valentine, discharged for disability.

Amos W. Warner, discharged for disability.

Charles 0. Wade, discharged for disability, Aug. 5, 1862.

EIGHTH, NINTH, AND TWELFTH INFANTRY.

Formation and Departure of the Eighth Infantry-Takes Part in the Expedition to South Carolina-Its Services and Battles there-Its Casualties-To Kentucky and Mississippi-Back to Kentucky Through Cumberland Gap to East Tennessee-Siege of Knoxville -Re-enlistment-Off to Virginia-Services in the Campaign of 1864-Brilliant closing Services-Muster out-Members from Barry County-From Allegan County-The Ninth Infantry recruited, mustered in, and ordered to Kentucky-Winter-Quarters there Services in Tennessee-Six Companies attacked at Murfreesboro by Forrest's Division of Cavalry-Suffers Heavy Loss, and is compelled to surrender-Prisoners exchanged-Regiment detailed as Provost-Guard-Re-enlistment- Continuation of Guard Duty through the War-Marches with Sherman's Army to Atlanta Services at Chattanooga and Nashville-Mustered out-Allegan County Members-Barry County Members-The Twelfth Infantry -Mustered in and hurried to the Front-Pittsburg Landing Battle of Metamora-A Detachment defends a Block-House Services in Mississippi-In Arkansas-Close of its Services-Barry County Members-Allegan County Members.

EIGHTH INFANTRY.

This regiment rendezvoused at Detroit.

It was mustered into the service Sept. 23, 1861, and on the 27th of the same month, having on its rolls the names of nine hundred and fifteen officers and enlisted men, it set out for the front, led by the gallant Col. William M. Fenton, of Flint.

At Annapolis, Md., on the 19th of October, 1861, it embarked as part of the expedition which under Gen. T. W. Sherman was to operate against the enemy along the South Atlantic coast.

From this time until the termination of the Antietam campaign the regiment was very actively engaged, participating in nine battles, occurring in four different States, viz.: Hilton Head, S. C.. Nov. 7, 1861; Port Royal Ferry, S. C., Jan. 1, 1862; Fort Pulaski, Ga., April 14, 1862; Wilmington Island, Ga., April 16, 1862; James Island, S. C., June 16, 1862; Bull Run, Va., Aug. 29 and 30, 1862; Chantilly, Va., Sept. 1, 1862; South Mountain, Md., Sept. 14, 1862; and Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862.

Its casualties at Wilmington Island were fourteen killed and thirty wounded; at James Island, thirteen killed, ninety-seven wounded, thirty-five missing, and thirty-five taken prisoners.

The alterations from the time of its enlistment to Nov. 1, 1862, showed the following astonishing results:

Number of men discharged, two hundred and sixty;

died of disease, fifty-five;

killed in battle or died of wounds received in action, eighty-nine;

wounded in action, two hundred and forty-three;

deserted, ten;

taken prisoner - One hundred of these were discharged because of their enlistment in the regular army.

joined by enlistment, two hundred and seventy-three;

officers resigned, twenty-one.

In March, 1863, it proceeded with the Ninth Army Corps to Kentucky, and in June following to Vicksburg, Miss.; thence in August it proceeded, via Cairo, Cincinnati, and Nicholasville, to Crab Orchard, Ky., and on the 10th of September it marched, via Cumberland Gap, to Knoxville, Tenn., where, with the Ninth Army Corps, under Gen. Burnside, it participated in the stirring scenes there enacted during the fall of 1863.

During the siege of Knoxville by the rebels under Longstreet the Eighth occupied the front line of works, and assisted to repel the fierce assault on Fort Sanders, Nov. 29, 1863.

The regiment during this period endured many hardships and privations from want of sufficient food and clothing.

The enemy were finally compelled to retire, and were pursued by the Eighth as far as Rutledge.

The regiment then re-enlisted as veteran volunteers, and on the 8th of January commenced its march across the mountains via Cumberland Gap. Nicholasville, Ky., was reached January 19th; a march of two hundred miles, through icy passes and over rough mountain-roads, having been performed in ten days.

Arriving home, a large number of recruits was obtained, and on the 9th of March, 1864, the regiment left its rendezvous at Flint, and again proceeded to join the Ninth Army Corps in Virginia.

Thenceforth its history was identified with that of the Army of the Potomac.

In the battle of the Wilderness it lost ninety-nine men, killed, wounded, and missing; at Spottsylvania, forty-nine; at Bethesda Church, fifty-two; at Petersburg, June 17th and 18th, forty-nine men.

At the Crater, Weldon Railroad, Ream's Station, Poplar Grove Church, Pegram Farm, Boydton Road, and Hatcher's Run, it was also engaged, losing numerously in killed, wounded, and missing.

During the year ending Nov. 1, 1864, it had lost in killed, or died of wounds received in action, eighty-six men; died of disease, forty; wounded in action, two hundred and eighty-seven; missing in action, twenty-nine; taken prisoners, thirty-seven; while it had gained by reenlistment of veterans two hundred and ninety-nine, and by the joining of recruits, five hundred and forty-two.

In the final campaign in Virginia the Eighth bore a distinguished part.

It assisted to repulse the enemy when he assaulted Fort Steadman, March 25, 1865, and on the 2d of April was engaged in the attack on his position at Fort Mahon, when it carried the works in its front, and was the first regiment to place its colors on that rebel stronghold.

It occupied Petersburg, April 3d, and soon after marched to 'City Point, whence it embarked on transports to Alexandria, Va.

It was mustered out of service at' Delaney House, D. C., July 30, 1865, and, arriving in Detroit, Michigan, Aug. 3, 1865, was paid in full and disbanded.

MEMBERS OF THE EIGHTH INFANTRY FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Non-Commissioned Staff.

Hosp. Stwd. John Michael, Hastings; enlisted Aug. 30, 1861; discharged at end of ser, vice, Sept. 23, 1864.

Company B.

Sergeant Saml. Stowell, enlisted Aug. 26, 1861; discharged for disability, March 23, 1863.

James H. Black, discharged to enlisted in regular army, Oct. 28, 1862.

John C. Black, veteran, enlisted Dec. 29, 1863; mustered out July 30, 1865.

David C. Lee, discharged to enlisted in regular army, Oct. 28, 1862. 

Company F.

1st Lieutenant Travers Philips, Hastings; cor. Aug. 29, 1861; res. June 11, 1862. 2d Lieutenant

Jacob Maus, Hastings; com. Aug. 29, 1861; res. Jan. 9, 1862. 1st Lieutenant

Austin D. Bates, Irving; enlisted Jan. 9, 1862; sergeant; res. Oct. 23, 1862.

Sergeant Wm. A. Thomas, Prairieville; enlisted Sept. 7, 1861; discharged for disability, Jan. 6, 1862.

Sergeant Jas. F. Mead, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 7, 1861; promoted 2d Lieutenant June 6, 1864; mustered out at end of service, Sept. 23, 1864.

Sergeant Chas. H. Swartout, Prairieville; enlisted Sept. 7, 1861; veteran, Dec. 30, 1863; promoted 2d Lieutenant

Co. G. Sergeant Chas. Snyder, Prairieville; enlisted Sept. 13, 1861; veteran, Dec. 30, 1863; promoted 2d Lieutenant; mustered out Sergeant, July 30, 1865.

Sergeant John M. Bessmer, Hastings; enlisted Aug. 30, 1861; discharged for disability, Dec. 31, 1863.

Corp. Augustus I. Newton, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 9, 1861; veteran, Dec. 30, 1863; mustered out July 30, 1865.

Corp. Edgar A. Nye, Prairieville; enlisted Sept. 12, 1861; veteran, Dec. 30, 1863; died in action at Spottsylvania, May 12, 1864.

Corp. Wm. H. H. Powers, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 2, 1861; veteran; discharged for disability, Jan. 6, 1862.

Corp. John H. Wolfe, Maple Grove; enlisted Sept. 13, 1861; discharged at end of service, Sept. 23, 1864.

Musician Wilbur F. Dickinson, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 13, 1861; vet. Dec. 30, 1863; discharged by order, Aug. 8, 1865.

Wagoner Robert D. Gates, Prairieville; enlisted Sept. 13, 1861; discharged by order, May 3, 1863.

Saml. Belsom, discharged for disability, Dec. 27, 1862.

Alonzo H. Bennett, discharged for disability, Feb. 13, 1863.

Julius Brazee, discharged at end of service, May 15, 1865.

Win. 0. Barrett, discharged at end of service, Sept. 22, 1864.

Wm. C. Barrett, Died of disease at Washington, D. C., August, 1864.

Dorrance E. Burdick, veteran, enlisted Dec. 29, 1863; mustered out July 30, 1865.

Sidney D. Cobb, died in action at James Island, S. C., June 16, 1862.

Emmett Cole, discharged for disability, Oct. 18, 1862.

Harlan Cole, discharged for disability, Oct. 26, 1862.

Geo. Cross, discharged at end of service, Sept. 22, 1864.

Alonzo B. Duffy, discharged for disability, Jan. 6, 1862.

Alvan B. Durham, veteran, died of disease at Washington, D. C., May 4, 1865.

John G. Dowd, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; mustered out July 30, 1865.

William Desmond, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; mustered out July 30, 1865.

Edward H. Easton, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; mustered out July 30, 1865.

Henry Grebel, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; mustered out July 30, 1865.

William H. Geiger, discharged fQr disability, March 27, 1862.

Abraham Guntrip, discharged Jan. 8, 1863.

Joseph Garnish, died of wounds at Washington, D. C., June 30, 1864.

Oliver H. Greenfield, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; discharged by order, July 6, 1865.

William LI. Holden, veteran, eul. Dec. 30, 1863; mustered out July 30, 1865.

Henry W. Hawes, discharged for disability, Jan. 6, 1862.

Edward Johnson, discharged for disability, Sept. 27, 1861.

Elijah Kibbee, discharged by order, Aug. 15, 1865.

Herman Knickerbocker, died in action at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864.

George W. Kightliner, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; died on picket duty before Petersburg, Va., Dec. 9, 1864.

George Lusk, died in action at James Island, S. C., June 16, 1862.

James Y. McLellan, died of wounds, June 25, 1862.

John F. Maile, discharged for promotion, Aug. 11, 1864.

Daniel McKenzie, discharged at end of service, March 27, 1865.

John L. Maile, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; discharged by order, Jan. 20, 1865.

Duncan McBain, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; discharged by order, June 13, 1865.

Daniel Pierce, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; discharged by order, Aug. 12, 1865.

John F. Phillips, died of disease at Hilton Head, S. C., Nov. 23, 1861.

James S. Perry, discharged at end of service, Sept. 22, 1864.

James I. Fullmer, discharged for disability, Oct. 26, 1862. George W. Peck, discharged for disability.

Close R. Palmer, discharged for disability. Charles M. Runyan, discharged for disability, Oct. 26, 1862.

Gurden Clark Rathbun, died in action at James Island, S. C., June 16, 1862.

William Stokes, died of disease at Hilton Head, S. C., Nov. 27, 1861.

Benjamin Sirebury, discharged for disability.

Henry Sliter, discharged for disability, Oct. 26, 1862.

Hiram Seeley, discharged at end of service, Sept. 22, 1864.

Edward G. Stoffe, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; mustered out July 30, 1865.

Richard C. Smith, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; died of disease in Michigan, Feb. 2, 1864.

John B. Tatro, died of disease at Hilton Head, S. C., Dec. 6, 1861.

William S. Turrell, died of wounds at Fredericksburg, Va., June 18, 1864.

Harmon Wanderlish, died in action at James Island, S. C., June 16, 1862.

Luther B. Wilcox, died at Spottsylvania, Va., May 9, 1864.

Myron H. Wells, discharged for disability, Dec. 9, 1862.

William R. Wheeler, discharged for disability, Dec. 9, 1862.

George Wellman, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; mustered out July 30, 1865.

John W. Waggoner, veteran, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863; discharged by order, Aug. 12, 1865.

Company G.

1st Lieutenant Chas. H. Swartout, Prairieville; enlisted Oct. 18, 1864; promoted Captain Co. K, April 25, 1865; mustered out July 30, 1865.

13 I William Carpenter, mustered out July 30, 1865.

Daidimus M. Darling, mustered out July 30, 1865.

John English, mustered out July 30, 1865.

John Lewis, mustered out July 30, 1865.

Company L

Edgar A. Clark, discharged by order, July 6, 1861.

Edgar H. Clark, discharged by order, Aug. 9, 1865.

Alonzo Gilbert, discharged by order, Aug. 9, 1865.

Elijah P. Guiger, discharged by order Aug. 9, 1865.

Pelingal D. Wright, discharged for disability, Feb. 4, 1865.

ALLEGAN COUNTY SOLDIERS IN THE EIGHTH INFANTRY.

Company D.

Quincy C. Lamoreaux, died of disease at home, April 25, 1865.

Company G.

Wm. Coleman, mustered out July 30, 1865.

Nathaniel Davis, mustered out July 30, 1865.

Robt. Patterson, mustered out July 30, 1865.

Thos. Welch, mustered out July 30, 1865.

Chas. Wilson, killed on picket before Petersburg, Feb. 18, 1865.

NINTH INFANTRY.

This regiment, so well known in the old Army of the Cumberland, was recruited during the summer and fall of 1861, its rendezvous being at Fort Wayne, near Detroit.

It was mustered into the United States service for three years Oct. 15, 1861, and ten days later proceeded to the seat of war in Kentucky, being the first regiment from Michigan to enter upon active service in the field, west of the Alleghanies.

It reached Jeffersonville, Ind., on the 27th, and the following day embarked for Salt River, Ky.

Soon after, it constructed a defensive work on Muldraugh's Hill, a point on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, where it remained during' the winter of 1861-62.

During its stay at that place the men of the Ninth were terribly afflicted with measles and other diseases, and as many as four hundred were on the sick-list at one time.

The regiment remained at its winter cantonment until February, 1862.

Immediately after the capture of Fort Donelson it was ordered to Nashville, Tenn., and after a few weeks to Murfreesboro, Tenn., where it was on garrison duty nearly all the time until July 13, 1862.

During that period, however, it formed part of Gen. Negley's command, which marched as far south as the Tennessee River, opposite Chattanooga, and then returned to Murfreesboro.

Subsequently four companies were detached and stationed at Tullahoma, Tenn.

On the 13th of July, at four o'clock in the morning, the six companies stationed at Murfreeibboro were attacked by three thousand rebel Cavalry under Gen. Forrest.

The Third Minnesota Infantry, with a battery, was encamped two miles northwest of the town.

The first attack on the camp of five companies-one company was at the courthouse-was repulsed.

Gen. Forrest then attacked the single company in the court-house.

Col. Parkhurst sent to the commander of the Minnesota regiment for aid, which the latter, perhaps for good reasons, declined to give.

The one company in the court-house held the foe at bay two hours, but was obliged to surrender.

Forrest then returned to attack the camp.

The men had meanwhile thrown up some slight defenses, behind which they fought vigorously until past noon, having just one hundred officers and men (out of less than three hundred) killed and wounded.

Finding themselves outnumbered ten to one, and receiving no assistance, they finally yielded to the inevitable, and surrendered.

The enlisted men were paroled at McMinnville, but the officers were not released until several months later.

In the latter part of December, 1862 (the prisoners taken at Murfreesboro having been exchanged and returned to duty) the regiment was detailed as provost-guard of the Fourteenth Corps, with Col. (afterwards General) Parkhurst as provost-marshal.

Gen. Thomas remarked, when he made the detail, that he had fully acquainted himself with the conduct of the regiment in the defense of Murfreesboro, and that he needed just such a force for provost-guard.

The Ninth acted in that capacity throughout the remainder of the war.

Its services at the battles of Stone River and Chickamauga in stopping runaways and maintaining order were arduous in the extreme, and were warmly complimented by Gen. Thomas.

When that gallant officer assumed command of the Army of the Cumberland, after Chickamauga, Col. Parkhurst was made provost-marshalgeneral of the department, and the Ninth became the provost-guard of that army.

In December, 1863, two hundred and twenty-nine of the regiment re-enlisted as veterans, and returned to Michigan on furlough.

In the latter part of February, 1864, they again appeared at Chattanooga, with their numbers increased to about five hundred men.

The regiment was again ordered to act as provost-guard of the Army of the Cumberland, and during the summer and autumn participated in all the movements of that army in Georgia and Tennessee.

It entered Atlanta on its evacuation by the enemy, and was there engaged in provost duty until that city was abandoned by the Union forces, when it returned to Chattanooga.

It was largely recruited during the season, and, notwithstanding the muster out of non-veterans whose terms had expired, had eight hundred and ninety-seven enlisted men on the 1st of November, 1864.

It remained in Chattanooga until the 27th of March, 1865, when it was moved to Nashville.

There it stayed on duty at headquarters and as guard at the military prison until the 15th of September, when it was mustered out of service.

The following day it set out for Michigan, arriving at Jackson on the 19th, and on the 26th day of September, 1865, the Ninth Michigan Infantry was paid off and disbanded.

MEMBERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Company E.

John C. Henry, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Loren Hill, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Geo. H. Kirkland, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Richard C. Kent, died of disease at Nashville, July 2, 1865.

Company H.

Mason F. Rose, died of disease at Chattanooga, March 25, 1865.

Samuel A. Raplee, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Hiram Saxton, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Asahel Sprague, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Jas. W. Schemerhorn, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Company I.

Christian Sutter, discharged by order, Jan. 7, 1865.

Eli Shuck, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Company K.

John E. Kenyon, mustered out Sept. 15, 1865.

Win. L. Torry, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Edwin O. Fenny, mustered out June 8, 1865.

John Weigand, mustered out July 4, 1865.

Company B.

Jas. W. Bennett, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Nicholas Barton, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Wm. Corey, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Horace Cook, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Saml. Coleman, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Patrick Colton, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Martin J. Darling, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Miles Woodmansee, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Company C.

Albert Emmons, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Samuel Fisk, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Lorenzo Lawrence, died of disease at Nashville, July 2, 1865.

Company D.

Wm. D. Green, mustered out June 20, 1865.

MEMBERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company A.

William W. Ashley, mustered out Sept. 15, 1865.

Company B.

Orrin J. Buck, mustered out June 20, 1865.

John H. Crispel, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 19, 1865.

Company E.

Sidney M. Constantine, mustered out Sept. 15, 1865.

George Gordon, discharged by order, Sept. 27, 1865.

Levi Kingsbury, died of disease at Chattanooga, Tenn., Jan. 7, 1865.

Company G.

Samuel A. Owen, discharged by order, June 20, 1865.

Company H.

Sheil Pulsifer, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Orrin Potter, mustered out Sept. 15, 1865.

Company L

Watson W. Wait, mustered out Sept. 15, 1865.

Company K.

John Tagle, mustered out Sept. 15, 1865.

TWELFTH INFANTRY.

The Twelfth Regiment of Michigan Infantry was mustered into the United States service at Niles, March 5, 1862, and on the 18th of the same month proceeded to St. Louis, Mo.

From there it was hurried forward to the Tennessee River, and reached Pittsburg Landing in time to take part in the battles fought there on the 6th and 7th of April.

It was also engaged in the battle of Metamora. on the Hatchie River, Oct. 5, 1862.

From the time of its organization to Nov. 1, 1862, it had lost forty-seven men killed, or died of wounds received in action, ninety-two wounded in action, one hundred and six died of disease, and one hundred and six men taken prisoners at Shiloh.

On the 24th of December, 1862, while one hundred and fifteen of the regiment were occupying a block-house at Middleburg, Tenn., they were attacked by a force of the enemy's Cavalry three thousand strong.

A severe engagement ensued, ending in the complete repulse of the enemy, with a loss to him of nine killed and eleven wounded, left on the field.

Gen. Grant in subsequent orders warmly congratulated the men on account of this heroic defense.

Early in June, 1863, the regiment was ordered to Vicksburg, Miss., and during the siege was stationed on Haynes' and Snyder's Bluffs. After the surrender of Vicksburg it was ordered into Arkansas, where the remainder of its service was performed.

It re-enlisted as a veteran regiment at Little Rock, in November, 1863, when it returned to Niles on furlough.

It again took the field -its ranks swelled by numerous recruits-in March, 1864;

THIRTEENTH INFANTRY.

I returning to Arkansas, where various duties were well performed until Feb. 15, 1866, when it was mustered out of the service at Little Rock.

It arrived at Jackson, Michigan, February 27th, where its members received their final pay and their discharge-papers, on the 6th of March, 1866.

BARRY COUNTY SOLDIERS WHO SERVED IN THE TWELFTH INFANTRY.

Field and Staff.

Asst. Surg. Almon A. Thompson, Vermontville; com. Sept. 24, 1862; res. Jan. 28, 1863; asst. surg. in 11th Cavalry., Dec. 23, 1863; mustered out Aug. 10, 1865.

Company A.

Alfred L. Clyborne, discharged by order, Jan. 24, 1866.

Henry Casselman, discharged by order, Jan. 24, 1866.

Charles E. Ferguson, discharged by order, Jan. 24, 1866.

John Heath, discharged for disability, Sept. 23, 1865.

Jay Proctor, died of disease at Duvall's Bluff, Ark., Jan. 7, 1865.

Company C.

Duncan McDonald, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Company E.

Perry Brown, died of disease at Duvall's Bluff, Ark., April 6, 1865.

William Brown, discharged by order, May 27, 1865.

Jesse Callihan, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

George L. Chandler, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Elijah J. Hale, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Charles C. Jenson, discharged by order, Sept. 14, 1865.

Company G.

Joel G. Brown, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Hamilton Brown, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Merritt Everett, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Warren Everett, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Alfred Feighner, died of disease at Little Rock, Ark., June 28, 1864.

John Rinehart, died of disease at Duvall's Bluff, Ark., Aug. 14, 1864.

Ansel Towle, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Aaron Wright, died of disease at Memphis, Tenn., Sept. 17, 1863.

John Walker, died of disease at Little Rock, Ark., June 3, 1864.

Company I.

John Hartwell, discharged by order, Aug. 22, 1865.

Solomon Seward, discharged by order, Sept. 30, 1865.

Company K.

Hiram Johnson, died of disease at Washington, Ark., July 11, 1865.

MEMBERS OF THE TWELFTH INFANTRY FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Company B.

Albert Critz, died of disease at Camden, Ark., Sept. 24, 1865.

Edward P. Coots, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Company E.

Frederick Hardy, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Jacob Snyder, discharged by order, Sept. 15. 1865.

Company F.

Sergeant Columbus Blake, Gun Plains; enlisted Dec. 10, 1861; died of disease at Pittsburgh, Pa.

Stephen Eldred, discharged September, 1862.

Lawrence B. Green, discl. by order, May 20, 1865.

Stephen M. Hamblen, discharged at end of service, Sept. 9, 1865.

Andrew J. Munger, discharged by order, June 17, 1865.

David S. Reynold, discharged Sept. 1, 1862.

Thomas H. Stubbarts, veteran, enlisted Feb. 24, 1864; discharged for disability, Jan. 19, 1865.

Company G.

Benjamirl Alexander, discharged by order, June 17, 1865.

Isaiah Rathbone, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Company H.

Milton Burnip, died of disease at Duvall's Bluff, Sept. 15, 1864.

Alfred Dolittle, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Joseph Pattengill, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

Samuel F. Stainbrook, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

THIRTEENTH INFANTRY.

Large Representation from These Counties in the Thirteenth-It joins Buell and marches to Pittsburg Landing-Siege of Corinth-Returns with Buell to Kentucky, and again advances to Tennessee Battle of Stone River-Great Bravery and Heavy Loss-Hard Marching-Battle of Chickamauga-Ordered to serve as Engineers -Re-enlistment-Services near Chattanooga-In Northern Alabama-It joins Sherman at Atlanta-The March to the Sea-The Method of the March-Through the Carolinas-Manner of Procedure-The Battle of Bentonville-A Hard Fight-Col. Eaton killed -Carlin's First Brigade holds its Ground-Repulsing the Enemy -Capturing a Large Force-Heavy Loss-Subsequent Services Muster out-Officers and Men from Allegan County-From Barry County.

The regiment above named, recruited during the fall of 1861, was mustered into the United States service for three years at Kalamazoo, Michigan, Jan. 17, 1862.

Among its officers and enlisted men the counties of Allegan and Barry were largely represented; the former by more than three hundred men,-its greatest representation in any separate command during the war.

It contained, too, a larger number of the sons of Barry County than any other regiment, excepting the Sixth Cavalry.

Commanded by Col. Michael Shoemaker, the regiment left Kalamazoo for the seat of war in Kentucky, Feb. 12, 1862, with nine hundred and twenty-five officers and men, to which number seventy-four were added by enlistment prior to July, 1862.

The Thirteenth joined Gen. Buell's forces, and with him marched through Kentucky and Tennessee, via Bowling Green and Nashville, to Pittsburg Landing, which place it reached, after a forced march, near the close of the second day's battle, too late to take part in the conflict.

From that time until the evacuation of Corinth by Beauregard, the Thirteenth was engaged in the arduous picket and pick-and-shovel duties performed by Gen. Halleck's army during the siege.

It then moved with Gen. Buell's forces into Northern Alabama, and was the last of the command to leave that locality when the general fell back towards Louisville.

It shared all the hardships of that long march across the States of Tennessee and Kentucky, and soon after reaching Louisville, in October, 1862, retraced its weary steps in pursuit of its old enemy, the rebel Gen. Bragg.

It aided in chasing him and his motley forces out of Kentucky, but was not present at any heavy engagement.

It suffered severely from disease, however; the deaths from this cause during the year ending Nov. 1, 1862, numbering seventy-one, while the number discharged for disability during the same time was one hundred and twenty.

After a short stay at Silver Springs, Tenn., the regiment advanced and aided in driving the enemy from Lebanon.

Proceeding to Nashville, it was on duty in that vicinity until the 26th of December, when it marched with Gen. Rosecrans' army towards Murfreesboro.

On the 29th it was deployed as skirmishers, and lost several in killed and wounded.

On the 31st of December, 1862, and the 1st and 2d of January, 1863, the regiment was hotly engaged in the battle of Stone River, having twenty-five killed, sixty-two wounded, and eight missing out of two hundred and twenty-four who entered the conflict.

On the 31st of December it recaptured by a bayonet charge two Union guns which had fallen into the hands of the enemy.

After the victory at Stone River the Thirteenth was engaged in building fortifications at Murfreesboro, and in scouting through the adjoining parts of Tennessee, until the 24th of June, 1863, when it advanced with Gen. Rosecrans against Bragg.

After various marches and countermarches in rear of the retreating forces of the latter general, the regiment, with its division, moved from Hillsboro', Tenn., to cross the Cumberland Mountains.

By a four days' march, over mountain ranges rising three thousand feet above the valleys, along roads so steep that the artillery and ambulances, and the baggage, supply and ammunition wagons often had to be hauled up by hand, the division reached the Sequatchie Valley.

It then crossed the Tennessee River at Shell Mound, and, marching upon Chattanooga, the Thirteenth was one of the first regiments to occupy that place.

On the 19th and 20th days of September, 1863, the regiment was in the midst of the hotly contested field of Chickamauga, where, although the Union troops, being outnumbered, were forced to retire from the field, the rebel loss far exceeded their own.

The Thirteenth went into this battle with two hundred and seventeen officers and men, and of that number lost twenty-five killed, fifty-seven wounded, and twenty-five missing, some of whom were probably killed.

The total number of those killed or mortally wounded in action during the year ending Nov. 1, 1863, was fifty-one, while there were ninety-two others wounded, sixty-six who died of disease, and one hundred and sixty-two who were discharged for disability.

On the 5th of November the Thirteenth, together with the Twenty-First and Twenty-Second Michigan Infantry and the Eighteenth Ohio Infantry, was organized into a brigade of engineers and assigned to duty at Chattanooga, being attached to the headquarters of the Department of the Cumberland.

It was present at the battles of Mission Ridge and Lookout Mountain, but was not seriously engaged.

During the months of December, 1863, and January, 1864, it was stationed on the Chickamauga, engaged in picket duty and in, cutting logs for building warehouses at Chattanooga.

The Thirteenth re-enlisted as a veteran organization January 17, 1864, and on the 5th of February started home, arriving at Kalamazoo on the 12th.

After the usual veteran furlough the regiment returned to the front on the 26th of March, with its numbers increased by over four hundred new recruits.

Chattanooga was again reached April 20, 1864, and for five months from that time the regiment was stationed at Lookout Mountain, engaged in the construction of military hospitals and guarding the sick and wounded sent back from Sherman's army.

It was then relieved from engineer duty and assigned to the Second Brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps.

After a severe march through Northern Alabama, in pursuit of Forrest's and Roddy's rebel Cavalry, the regiment joined its brigade at Rome, Ga., on the 1st of November.

As the Fourteenth and other corps retraced their steps towards Atlanta, the towns on the route, bridges, telegraph lines, and railroads were all destroyed.

And when the corps marched into Atlanta, on the afternoon of November 15th, the city was already in flames, no more to be made a rebel stronghold.

On the following morning Gen. Sherman's army set out on the celebrated “march to the sea" with one day's rations in the haversacks and none in the supply-trains.

This renowned but comparatively easy achievement was accomplished by sixty thousand men, veterans, all of them, and the flower of the whole Western army, who swept in a resistless mass through Georgia, brushing contemptuously aside the few feeble detachments of militia and conscripts which endeavored to oppose them, without delaying for a moment their own mighty and majestic advance.

Having reached Savannah on the 10th of December, 1864, the regiment was on duty in the trenches before that city until the 21st of the same month, when Hardee's rebel forces evacuated the place.

On the 17th of January, 1865, The force under the immediate command of Gen. Sherman in his march through Georgia and the Carolinas was composed of the Fifteenth and S nnh and Seventeeth Army Corps, or " Army of the Tennessee," under Gen. Howard, as the right wing, and the Fourteenth and Twentieth Army Corps, or "Army of Georgia," under Gen. Slocum, as the left wing, while Kilpatrick's division of Cavalry guarded the front, flanks, and rear.

The Fourteenth and Twentieth Army Corps formed the major portion of the Army of the Cumberland during the Atlanta campaign of 1864, but at the beginning of Gen. Sherman's " march to the sea" the name of Army of Georgia was adopted, to distinguish Gen. Slocum's command from the troops commanded by Gen. Thomas, who still remained in command of the Army and Department of the Cumberland, with headquarters at Nashville, Tenn.

These four army corps already mentioned were composed of three divisions each, except the Fifteenth, which had four divisions, and each corps, having its own artillery, ammunition, ambulance, pontoon and supply trains, was a separate and well-equipped army in itself.

When no enemy appeared the corps moved on parallel roads from ten to fifteen miles distant from each other.

In case fighting was apprehended, the two corps forming a wing were massed upon one road.

The Fourteenth Corps, commanded by Gen. Jeff; C. Davis, with Kilpatrick's Cavalry, was usually to be found on the extreme left flank of the armies.

Its First, Second, and Third Divisions were commanded respectively by Gens. Carlin, J. D. Morgan, and Baird, and their movements were made in the following order: Carlin, with the First Division, would take the advance for three days; from two to five miles in rear of him was Morgan, with the Second; while in the rear was Baird, encumbered and struggling to bring forward over swamps, creeks, and rivers the corps trains of six hundred wagons, to each of which was attached six mules, guided with single rein by a profane Northern Jehu, who did not seem to enjoy his position unless covered with mud from spur to visor.

On the morning of the fourth day Carlin would fall in in the rear, taking Baird's position, Baird would move in the centre, while Morgan took the advance, and thus they alternated at the beginning of each fourth day. Meantime, foraging-parties of from fifty to sixty men, detailed daily from each regiment, scoured the country in front and on the flanks for provisions.

Indeed, so anxious were these foragers to " strike a fresh plantation" before those of other commands that they usually left camp as early as two o'clock A.M., and throughout the day kept in advance of the main column of troops by a distance of from five to ten miles, very frequently being found in advance of Kilpatrick's Cavalry.

Whether on foot, on mules, or mounted on Southern thoroughbreds, jolting along in a loaded plantation cart, or riding into camp seated in a sumptuous barouche, the foragers of the Fourteenth Corps cared little for Wheeler's, Butler's, or I1impton's rebel Cavalry, and when attacked by them, readily organized their skirmish line and reserve, without officers, and, advancing, cleared their way.

Thus did Sherman's armies bowl "down to the sea," and after the proud and defiant city of Savannah was within their grasp the same scenes were re-enacted in the march northwards through the Carolinas.

The regiment advanced with the Army of Georgia up the right bank of the Savannah River to Sisters' Ferry, where, after much labor and delay, it crossed into South Carolina.

Thence it proceeded, via Barnwell Court-House, Williston, and Lexington, to near Columbia, S. C.; there it crossed the Saluda River, and, moving up the west bank of the Catawba, crossed the latter river at Rocky Mount, where rains, mud, and swollen streams again hindered the Fourteenth Corps for more than a week.

After making the passage of the Catawba, the command was hurried forward by forced marches to Cheraw, where, on the south bank of Great Pedee, the main forces were overtaken. From there to Fayetteville, N. C., skirmishing with the enemy's Cavalry was a daily occurrence.

The enemy under Hardee was driven out of the latter place and pursued to Averysboro', N. C., where, on the 16th of March, a sharp engagement ensued; the enemy being driven from the field, losing heavily in killed and wounded, besides many prisoners,among the latter being Col. Rhett and his famous regiment of young South Carolinians.

The Union forces operating in this field were those of the Fourteenth and Twentieth Army Corps, commanded by Gen. Slocum; the Army of the Tennessee, or right wing, being some twenty-five or thirty miles to the eastward, moving on Goldsboro'.

One division of the Fourteenth Corps and of the Twentieth were guarding their respective corps-trains, leaving but four small divisions-at the most not more than twenty thousand men, and one third of those shoeless-to engage such numbers as might oppose them.

From Averysboro' the Fourteenth Corps took the advance, Morgan's Second Division leading, and Carlin's First coming next.

Baird was guarding the train, while the two divisions of the Twentieth Corps were in the rear of Carlin.

During the 17th and 18th of March, Morgan's skirmishers had several encounters with the enemy, but the latter rapidly retired whenever his columns were seen advancing, until late in the afternoon of the 18th, when the Confederates disputed his further progress with artillery, supported by infantry and Cavalry.

Morgan's First Brigade, composed of the Tenth and Fourteenth Michigan Infantry, Sixteenth and Sixtieth Illinois Infantry, and Seventeenth New York Infantry, being in the advance, immediately formed line of battle and moved forward, when the enemy again retired.

The regiments of this brigade stacked arms on their color-lines and encamped for the night.

Gen. Sherman, with his staff and escort, also established his headquarters in the midst of this brigade the same evening.

Early on the morning of the 19th the general commanding set out to join the right wing, and Carlin's First Division of the Fourteenth Corps moved to the front, to take the advance for the three succeeding days.

By this time Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, one of the best officers in the Confederate service, had collected all the available rebel troops in Georgia, North and South Carolina, and was prepared with near forty thousand men to make one desperate effort to stop Sherman's advance toward Richmond, or at least to defeat his left wing.

He accordingly took up a strong position near the little village of Bentonville, which gave its name to the battle which followed.

His presence was unknown to the Union troops in his front, and when Carlin's troops moved out on the morning of the 19th, they did so with buoyant spirits and the long, swinging stride so characteristic of this army.

Johnston's army and line of earthworks were scarcely five miles distant from the place where Morgan encamped on the night of the 18th.

Therefore, Carlin had hardly given room for Morgan to place his command on the road when his (Carlin's) advance struck the enemy, and at once became hotly engaged.

Morgan's troops hurried forward on the double-quick and took position, by orders of Gen. Davis, on Carlin's right, while the two divisions of the Twentieth Corps came up with all possible speed and went into line on his left.

At the beginning of the battle the First Division advanced with confident steps to what they expected would be but a repetition of their former easy victories, and at one time the Thirteenth Michigan gained a position within six rods of the enemy's intrenchments, but the storm of lead was too severe to be withstood.

The brave Col. Willard G. Eaton, of Otsego, was shot dead at the head of his men, and at length the whole division was compelled to fall back to the shelter of a low acclivity within easy musket-range of the enemy's works.

The battle raged with wavering fortunes all the rest of the day.

Johnston, in the hopes of destroying before reinforcements could come up a force much less than his own, forced the fight, but the men who here represented the Union arms were the surviving heroes of Donelson, Shiloh, Island No. 10, Corinth, Perrysville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and Lookout Mountain, besides the score of battles fought during the Atlanta campaign; while the eastern troops of the Twentieth Corps had breasted the leaden storm on the Peninsula, at Chantilly, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg before joining the Army of the Cumberland.

They were men who had been out two months from Savannah, receiving during that time no mails, letters, or tidings from home, and they did not propose to be balked in their onward march now, or to assist in filling rebel prison-pens, and the oft-repeated assaults of the enemy were met by a withering fire and counter-charges which sent them hurrying to the shelter of the woods.

While Carlin's division and the Twentieth Corps were so warmly engaged on the open ground, Morgan was equally busy in the pines on the right, and his First Brigade, under Gen. Vandever, composed of the Michigan, Illinois, and New York Regiments previously mentioned, had the best fortune of any of the troops in the battle of that day.

This brigade was stationed on the extreme right, and its right flank was guarded by an impenetrable swamp.

During the intervals between the charges of the enemy, Vandever's brigade was enabled to erect log breastworks, the trees being felled and cut into the required lengths with hatchets, of which nearly every man carried one in his waist-belt.

Late in the afternoon, during a desperate charge on Morgan's left, one of his brigades gave way, and a column of the rebels occupied low, swampy ground.

Their position was screened by a dense pine forest, and was approached by the Union forces over cleared fields.

The enemy passed through the gap.

Wheeling to the left, they moved down in rear of Vandever's brigade, making it necessary for the Union troops to occupy the front side of their own works, from before which their immediate opponents had happily retired.

Here a short sharp fight of a few moments' duration was ended by Vandever's men leaping forward in a charge, and compelling the surrender of several hundred rebels.

In this battle the Thirteenth Michigan Infantry lost one hundred and ten officers and men, killed, wounded, and captured.

During the long night which succeeded, Gen. Sherman was marching the Army of the Tennessee to the reinforcement of the almost overwhelmed, but not defeated, Army of Georgia.

He arrived at daylight of the 20th, and a day or so later Johnston was driven from the field.

After his surrender the Thirteenth proceeded with its command to Washington, D. C., and participated in the grand review of Gen. Sherman's army, May 24, 1864; left that city on the 9th of June, reaching Louisville, Ky., on the 15th of the latter month.

It was mustered out of service at Louisville, July 25th, and on the 27th of July, 1865, arrived at Jackson, Michigan, where it was paid off and disbanded.

OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY WHO SERVED IN THE THIRTEENTH INFANTRY.

Field and Staff.

Col. Willard G. Eaton, Otsego; com. Feb. 23, 1865; Major, May 26, 1863;

Captain Co. I, Oct. 20, 1862; 1st Lieutenant Co. I, Oct. 3, 1861; killed in action at Bentonville, N. C., March 19, 1865.

Lieutenant-Col. P. Van Arsdale, Saugatuck; com. May 12, 1865; Major, April 25, 1865; mustered out July 25, 1865. (See Co. A.)

Adj. Alanson B. Case, Otsego; com. Jan. 20, 1863; mustered out at end of service Jan. 16, 1865. Non- Commissioned Staff.

Sergeant-Major Alanson B. Case, Otsego; enlisted Oct. 17, 1861; promoted to 2d lieuit.

Co. B.

Sergeant Major Clark D. Fox, Otsego; promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Co. I.

Q.-M. Sergeant Kilburn W. Mansfield, Otsego; promoted to 2d Lieutenant Co. A, July 4, 1862.

Com. Sergeant John Kirby, Allegan; promoted to 2d Lieutenant Co. A, April 25, 1865.

Company A.

Captain P. Van Arsdale, Saugatuck; com. Feb. 28, 1863; 1st Lieutenant, July 13, 1862; promoted to Major, April 25, 1865. (See Field and Staff.)

1st Lieutenant Kilburn W. Mansfield, Otsego; com. Feb. 28, 1863; 2d Lieutenant, July 4, 1862; promoted to Captain

Co. I. 2d Lieutenant John Kirby, Allegan; com. April 25, 1865; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Carlton Barton, discharged for disability, April 30, 1865.

Edgar Barton, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Clark B. Brewster, discharged by order, Sept. 8, 1865.

Henry Carmody, died of disease in New York City, Jan. 12, 1865.

Edwin Chamberlain, mustered out July 25, 1865.

John E. Case, mustered out July 25, 1865.

James Delevan, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Russell Dyer, died of disease in Allegan, Oct. 1, 1862.

Abial Emmons, discharged for disability, June 25, 1862.

William Ernmons, discharged for disability, June 23, 1862.

Philander J. Edson, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Myron C. Finch, discharged by order, July 14, 1865.

Henry Gillespie, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Joseph W. Hershaw, mustered out July 20, 1865.

Edward Howe, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Martin Harter, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Amasa Jones, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Chauncey Jones, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Joseph Kipp, mustered out July 25, 1865.

James H. Lewis, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Clark H. Lyman, mustered out Aug. 4, 1865.

Alvin W. Morley, discharged by order, May 20, 1865.

Henry Merchant, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Amos C. Root, died of disease on government steamer, May 7, 1865.

Jacob Schweikert, discharged by order, June 7, 1865.

Alexander W. Sprague, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Abel Stearns, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Samuel Shepard, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Calvin Underwood, discharged for disability, May 16, 1862.

Job Underwood, died of disease at Louisville, July 6, 1862.

George B. Van Arsdale, died of disease at Pittsburgh, May 30, 1865.

I Walter Wood, discharged for disability, Sept. 17, 1862.

Milton B. Williams, discharged by order, June 13, 1865.

Company B.

Captain George B. Force, Gun Plains; com. Sept. 23, 1861; res. May 31, 1862.

Captain Dewitt C. Kenyon, Ganges; com. March 19, 1864; let Lieutenant, Jan. 31, 1863; mustered out July 25, 1865.

1st Lieutenant Jacob G. Fry, Ganges; com. May 31, 1862; 2d Lieutenant, Oct. 3, 1861; res. for disability, Jari. 31, 1863.

1st Lieutenant John H. Baldwin, Ganges; com. May 12, 1865; 2d Lieutenant, Aug. 26, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865. 2d Lieutenant

Alanson B. Case, Otsego; com. May 31, 1862; promoted to 1set Lieutenant and adj. (See Field and Staff.)

2d Lieutenant Howell H. Trask, Gun Plains; com. Jan. 20, 1863; promoted to 1st Lieutenant; res. as 2d Lieutenant

2d Lieutenant Leonard E. Perry, Gun Plains; corn, April 25, 1865; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Sergeant Spencer H. Banks, Ganges; enlisted Oct. 9, 1861; died at Corinth, Miss., June 12, 1862.

Sergeant Howell IH. Trask, Ganges; promoted to 2d Lieutenant

Sergeant Dewitt C. Kenyon, Allegan; enlisted Oct. 10, 1861; promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Sergeant William 0. Allen, Ganges; enl, Oct. 2, 1861; missing in action at Chickamauga, Sept. 19, 1863.

Sergeant John H. Baldwin, Ganges; enlisted Oct. 1, 1861; veteran, Feb. 11, 1864; promoted to 2d Lieutenant

Co. G.

Corp. Joseph Miller, Ganges; enlisted Oct. 4, 1861; veteran, Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Corp. William H1. Sherman, Gun Plains; enlisted Oct. 1, 1861; died of disease at St. Louis, March 16, 1862.

Musician Edward Breen, Ganges; enlisted Oct. 17, 1861; veteran, Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Musician William Martin, Ganges; enlisted Dec. 10, 1861; discharged for disability, May 27, 1862.

Elias Anway, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Edson Amidon, mustered out July 25, 1865.

James Briggs, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Noah Briggs, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Linus Bathrick, discharged for disability, July 19, 1862.

William Burns, discharged Aug. 8, 1862.

Lewis Bell, discharged at end of service, March 22, 1865.

Horace S. Beach, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

William H. Barnes, discharged by order, June 9, 1865.

William II. Briggs, died of disease at Savannah, Ga., Dec. 21, 1864.

James W. Billings, transferred to Signal Corps, Jan. 13, 1864.

Win. B. Chase, discharged for disability, April 28, 1862.

Henry C. Curtis, discharged for disability, Jan. 15, 1864.

Geo. Curtis, discharged by order, June 15, 1865.

John Curtis, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Warren Cushman, discharged by order, June 21, 1865.

John Crow, mustered out July 25, 1865.

L. Y. Cady, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Henry Cheney, mustered out July 25, 1865.

John Claffy, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Orson W. Davis, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Luzerne Durand, discharged by order, July 11, 1865.

Freeman II. Day, died of disease at Lookout Mountain, June 30, 1861.

James Eggleston, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Herman P. Fisher, discharged for disability, Aug. 28, 1862.

Austin Foot, died of disease at Shiloh, Tenn.

Freeland Gray, discharged for disability, June 22, 1864.

Wm. Gould, veteran; enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Wallace Goodsell, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Thos. A. Hubbard, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Frank Hapgood, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Jas. Huddlestone, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Elijah Howard, died of disease at Louisville, Ky., Jan. 17, 1864.

Geo. Hamilton, discharged for disability, Sept. 12, 1862.

Pembroke Hazen, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

Morris A. James, mustered out July 25, 1865. John Knowlton, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Daniel Lee, died ot wounds received in action, Dec. 24, 1863.

Cyrille Le Due, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 15, 1864.

Frank May, discharged for disability, May 21, 1863.

Sylvester Munger, discharged for disability, April 2, 1863.

Wirt J. Morris, discharged for disability, Feb. 28, 1863.

Chas E. McCarty, discharged for disability, May 22, 1862.

Geo. A. Miller, discharged for disability, May 20, 1862.

Wm. B. Miller, died of disease at Bowling Green, March 14, 1862.

Adam Mil er, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Elliott McRae, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Robert Meldrum, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Geo. H. Newcomb, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, April 10, 1864.

Ruloff P. Ockford, discharged for disability, July 9, 1862.

Henry B. Oliver, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Lemuel W. Osborn, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Edson M. Porter, mustered out July 25, 1865.

John D. Patterson, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Stephen G. Parker, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Edward Penfold, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Henry Penfold, died of disease at Murfreesboro, Tenn., June 12, 1863.

Milton Pratt, died of disease at Savannah, Ga., Feb. 15, 1865.

James Pierce, died Qf disease in New York Harbor, April 8, 1865.

Geo. W. Russell, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Sept. 30, 1863.

Irwin L. Ross, discharged for disability, June 2, 1863.

Wm. H. Ross, discharged at end of service, Jan. 18, 1865.

Leroy Root, mustered out July 25, 1865. Melvin Reed, mustered out July 25, 1865.

James Seringer, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Samuel E. Stillson, veteran, enlisted Feb. 8, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Albertus Simons, discharged by order, July 19, 1865.

Jos. Sinclair, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

Orletus C. Thayer, discharged at end of service, April 28, 1865.

Ormenus Thayer, discharged for disability, May 21, 1862.

Chas. T. Wilson, discharged for disability, May 21, 1862.

Geo. F. Warner, veteran, enlisted Feb. 8, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Wm. White, mustered out July 25, 1865.

David Woodbeck, mustered out July 25, 1863.

Company C.

Sergeant Albert G. Wetmore, Allegan; veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; promoted 2d Lieutenant

Co. F.

Jos. W. Buttrick, died of disease, Jan. 15, 1864.

Lewis M. Bennett, discharged at end of service, Jan. 20, 1865.

Geo. Cook, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Geo. Delabarre, discharged for disability, Oct. 21, 1865.

Leander Fox, killed in action in North Carolina, March 19, 1865.

Alden C. Hand, killed in action at Stone River.

Abram Hofmeister, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Isaac Itofmeister, mustered out July 25, 1865.

John Hofmeister, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Saml. Mosier, mustered out July 25, 1865,

Isaac E. Morse, died of disease at Kalamnizoo, Feb. 15, 1862.

Chas. W. Morse, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Francis Murray, discharged by order, Jan. 14, 1864.

Andrew McGaw, discharged for disability, June 2, 1862.

Eliphalet Porter, discharged for disability, April 10, 1862.

Walter Pullman, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Burtis Rutgers, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

John Sweezy, mustered out July 25, 1865.

John Staring, discharged by order, June 2, 1865.

J. H. Tanner, died of disease at Corinth, Miss., June 7, 1862.

Salem True, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Chas. Tyler, mustered out July 25, 1865. Geo. Tyler, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Nathan G. Wilson, died of disease at Nashville, Sept. 19, 1862.

Warren W. Wilcox, veteran, entl. Jan. 18, 1861; died of disease at Jackson, Michigan, April 24, 1864.

Samuel Winger, discharged for disability, Nov. 7, 1862.

John Wynn, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Joel Yerton, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Company D.

Lee J. Bishop, discharged for disability, May 1, 1862.

Chas. Butterfield, discharged Aug. 1, 1865.

Harvey D. Culver, discharged for disability, March 27, 1863.

Win. Sloan, discharged July 5, 1862.

Company E.

Chauncey E. Blossom, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Samuel Caruthers, died of disease, Dec. 12, 1863.

Peter Lahman, mustered out July 25, 1865.

David Lowe, discharged May 15, 1865.

Jabez McClelland, discharged for disability, July 7, 1865.

Joseph Misner, mustered out June 26, 1865.

Bela G. Moulton, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Philander Palmer, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Ebenezer E. Ross, died of disease at Washington, Oct. 26, 1862.

Alfred W. Sliter, discharged for disability, Sept. 14, 1862.

Thos. J. Shellman, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Caleb Van Vrain, died of disease at Alexandria, Va., May 30, 1865.

James Wood, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Company F.

2d Lieutenant Albert G. Wetmore, Allegan, May 26, 1864; promoted 1st Lieutenant July 5, 1865; mustered out July 25, 1865.

James Cisnee, mustered out May 15, 1865.

Wm. H. Drake, discharged by order, May 30, 1865.

Company G.

Captain George M. Rowe, Saugatuck; com. March 9, 1865; 1st Lieutenant Feb. 13, 1863; com. Major July 6, 1865, but not mustered; mustered out as Captain July 25, 1865.

Sergeant John H. Baldwin, Ganges; promoted 2d Lieutenant

Company B.

Corp. Fredk. Severance, enlisted Nov. 18, 1861; discharged for disability, Aug. 15, 1862.

Wagoner Win. H. Meade, enlisted Oct. 23, 1861; discharged May 30, 1863.

John S. Black, discharged for disability, July 10, 1862.

Wm. A. Babbitt, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Edwin F. Case, died of wounds, Sept. 24, 1863.

David Cornelius, died of disease in Indiana, Jan. 22, 1865.

Edward Germond, died in Andersonville prison, May 16, 1864.

Henry Hinds, died of wounds at Chattanooga, Nov. 26, 1863.

Chillon Runnels, died of disease, Jan. 15, 1864.

Wm. Starr, died of disease. Feb. 15, 1861.

Byron Teal, discharged for disability, Oct. 20, 1862.

Jeptha Waterman, discharged for disability, July 10, 1862.

Randall C. Waterman, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Company H.

David Barrington, discharged by order, July 18, 1865.

Wm. H. Cronk, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

Elisha W. Call, discharged for disability, Jan. 3, 1863.

Albert M. Dustin, mustered out July 25, 1865. Isaac Fisher, mustered out July 29, 1865.

Henry Germond, discl. at end of service, Jan. 17, 1865.

Seth Loveridge, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

James Orr, discharged by order, May 27, 1865.

John M. Pinney, discharged for disability.

Wm. H. Rumsey, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Sept. 1, 1863.

James Shattuck, discharged for disability, July 13, 1862.

Orville Whitlock, discli. for disability, Dec. 22, 1862.

Company L

Captain Henry C. Stoughlton, Otsego; com. Oct. 3, 1861; res. Oct. 20, 1862.

Captain Willard G. Eaton, Otsego; com. Oct. 20, 1862; let Lieutenant Oct. 3, 1861; promoted to Major May 26, 1863.

Captain Clark D. Fox, Otsego; com. June 13, 1863; 1st Lieutenant Oct. 20, 1862; Sergeant Major; killed in action at Chickamauga, Tenn., Sept. 19, 1863.

Captain K. W. Mansfield, Otsego; cornm. March 19, 1864; 1st Lieutenant Feb. 28, 1863; mustered out July 25, 1865.

2d Lieutenant P. Van Arsdale, Saugatuck; com. Oct. 3, 1861; promoted to 1st Lieutenant, Co. A, July 13, 1862.

2d Lieutenant Geo. M. Rowe, Saugatuck; com. July 13, 1862; promoted to 1st Lieutenant, Co. G, July 13, 1863.

2d Lieutenant Geo. Nelson, Otsego; com. June 13, 1863; wounded, and discharged June 1, 1864.

2d Lieutenant John H. Stephens, com. April 25, 1865; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Sergeant Isaiah Beard, Otsego; enlisted Oct. 7, 1861; discharged for disability, Jan. 25, 1862.

Sergeant Clark D. Fox, Otsego; enlisted Oct. 16, 1861; appointed Sergeant-Major

Sergeant K. W. Mansfield, Otsego; promoted to 2d Lieutenant,

Co. A.

Sergeant Geo. M. Rowe, Saugatuck; enlisted Nov. 1, 1861; promoted to 2d Lieutenant

Co. I.

Sergeant Geo. Nelson, Otsego; enlisted Oct. 21, 1861; promoted to 2d Lieutenant

Co. I.

Sergeant John W. Travis, Otsego; enlisted Oct. 7, 1861; died of disease at Nashville, April 20, 1862.

Sergeant John H. Stephens, Allegan; enlisted Oct. 26, 1861; veteran, Jan. 18, 1864; promoted to 2d Lieutenant

Corp. Amos. Dunning, Saugatuck; enlisted Nov. 1, 1861; died of disease in Alabama.

Corp. Hugh W. Dixon, Manlius; enlisted Oct. 26, 1861; transferred to Co. A.

Corp. G. H. Slotman, Overisel; ertl. Nov. 12, 1861; discharged at end of service, May 22, 1865.

Corp. Edward M. Bissel, Otsego; enlisted Oct. 23, 1861; transferred to Invalid Corps; discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Corp. Edward Stowe, Manlius; enlisted Oct. 23, 1861; transferred to Invalid Corps, Aug. 1, 1863.

Corp. Jacob M. Chapman, Manlius; enlisted Jan. 9, 1862; died at St. Louis, May 25, 1862.

Musician Clark C. Bailey, Fillmore; enlisted Dec. 3, 1861; veteran, Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Musician Herbert Day, Otsego; enlisted Nov. 12, 1861; veteran, Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Wagoner John A. McClaire, Saugatuck; enlisted Dec. 16, 1861; veteran, Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Cyrus E. Ames, shot in a quarrel, Sept. 20, 1863.

Samuel Agan, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Benjamin T. Binn, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Charles Barry, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Charles L. Bard, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Benjanmin B. Brush, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Boswell R. Burlinghame, died of disease at Otsego, Michigan

Isaac Brundage, died of disease at New Albany, Ind.

Erritt Brockman, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 24, 1862.

Oscar Bissell, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Aug. 3, 1863.

Martin S. Brown, died of disease at Salina, Michigan, April 17, 1863.

William C. Brundage, discharged for disability, Jan. 25, 1862.

Peter H. Billings, discharged for disability, Nov. 5, 1862.

Edward Bissell, discharged by order, Aug. 26, 1863.

Leander Ballard, discharged for disability, Dec. 5, 1863.

Henry L. Beach, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, March 15, 1864. T

homas Cooper, mustered out Jlly 25, 1865.

Jan. Dannenborg, died of disease, April 28, 1862.

William W. Dormer, discharged for disability, May 13, 1863.

James K. Dole, discharged for disability, Oct. 4, 1862.

William Dusenbury, discharged for disability, Nov. 15, 1862.

Charles 0. Edwards, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Dec. 1, 1863,

Daniel Eaton, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Miles B. Eaton, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Charles Francisco, mustered out July 25, 1865.

William E. Fields, mustered out July 25, 1865.

James L. Fairbanks, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Frederick R. Fuller, died of disease at Louisville, Oct. 1, 1862.

Charles Garlock, discharged by order, July 20, 1865.

Henry Holt, discharged for disability, May 13, 1863.

David Hammond, discharged for disability, June 1, 1863.

John Hackhouse, discharged for disability, May 4, 1864.

Charles Hogle, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Jacob Hazen, mulst. out July 25, 1865.

John Inman, mustered out July 18, 1865.

John P. Jones, mustered out July 25, 1865.

George N. Joslyn, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

William Joslyn, discharged for disability, Aug. 1, 1863.

James C. Jones, discharged for disability, Nov. 28, 1863.

O. P. Kingsbury, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn.

Martin Kramer, died of dise:se at Lookout Mountain, Aug. 2, 1864.

John Kramer, mustered out July 25, 1865.

John Knight, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Smith Larkin, discharged for disability, May 2, 1862.

Jasper Lusk, discharged for disability, Nov. 11, 1862.

Jacob Mooney, died of disease at Danville, Va., May 14, 1862.

William McKee, died of disease, April 16, 1862.

George C. Miner, died of disease at Murfreesboro, Tenn., April 4, 1863.

William Miner, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Andrew J. Myers, mustered out July 25, 1865.

George A. Myers, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Joseph Masterson, mustered out July 25, 1865.

John McQueen, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; died in action at Bentonville, March 19, 1865.

Robert Nelson, veteran, enlisted Jan.18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Henry Newton, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Hezekiah B. Niles, discharged for disability, Oct. 28, 1862.

Stephen Pratt, discharged for disability. Sylvanus S. Palmer, died of disease, May 15, 1862.

Philander Palmer, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, April 10, 1864.

John W. Purdy, died of wounds, April 22, 1865.

Thomas L. Parker, mustered out July 25, 1865.

George E. Reynolds, died of disease, July 13, 1862.

Alonzo Rouse, died of wounds, Sept. 26, 1863.

Stephen Rowe, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Peter Rauf, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Allen Smith, discharged for disability, Nov. 11, 1862.

Ward P. Smith, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 1, 1863.

James Smith, mustered out July 25, 1865.

William Simmons, veteran, eil. Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

David Simmonds, discharged by order, July 14, 1865.

Perry Slaw, died of disease, May 22, 1862.

Harvey H. Sqnlier, died of disease at Savannah, Ga., Dec. 31, 1864.

Norton Schermerhorn, mustered out July 25, 1865.

John H. Slotman, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1865; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Wm. A. Upson, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Burd Vanderhoop, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

John R. Ward, discharged by order, Aug. 14, 1865.

Danl. Warne, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Henry Wilson, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Eldridge Wilson, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Levi Wilson, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Enos Warner, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Geo. W. Wise, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Itha Xocum, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Company K.

Frank A. Beardsley, discharged by order,June 8, 1865.

Win. Gibson, died of disease at David's Island, New York Harbor, June 28, 1865.

Robert Nelson, discharged for disability, Aug. 28, 1862.

BARRY COUNTY MEMBERS OF THE THIRTEENTH INFANTRY.

Field and Staff and Non-Commissioned Staff.

1st Lieutenant and Q.-M. Charles H. Ruggles, Prairieville; com. March 19, 1864; 2d Lieutenant; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Q.M. Sergeant Daniel B. Hosmer, Castleton; promoted to 2d Lieutenant, Co. D, Sept. 17, 1862.

Com. Sergeant Fitz Allen Blackman, Prairieville; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Company A.

2d Lieutenant Charles H. Ruggles, Prairieville; con, Feb. 28, 1863; promoted to 1st Lieutenant and quartermaster.

Sergeant Thos. B. Dunn, Prairieville; enlisted Dec. 25, 1861; died at Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 6, 1863.

Sergeant Nathaniel P. Bunnell, Barry; enlisted Dec. 18, 1861; veteran, Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Corp. Wm. L. Gunton, Thornapple; enlisted Dec. 13, 1861; discharged July 25, 1862.

Corp. Dyer Russell, Maple Grove; enlisted Dec. 14, 1861; died of disease at Allegan, Oct. 1, 1862.

Corp. Wm. J. Storms, Prairieville; enlisted Oct. 23, 1861; veteran, Jan. 18, 1864; absent sick at muster out.

Musician Anson G. Philips, Prairieville; enlisted Nov. 1, 1861; discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Robert Allen, discharged for disability, June 23, 1862.

Noah J. Bowker, discharged for disability, April 30, 1861.

Aaron Borie, discharged July 4, 1862. Jacob Bennett, died of disease at Iuka, Ala., June 11, 1862.

James Brew, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864.

James Cook, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864.

Lyman A. Cross, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., April 29, 1862.

Horace Castle, died of disease at Bowling Green, Ky., Oct. 21, 1862.

Elnathan H. Case, discharged for disability, Aug. 16, 1862.

Benjamin T. Cobb, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

William Campbell, discharged for disability, Aug. 18, 1862.

Marcine B. Chamberlain, discharged for disability, Oct. 29, 1862.

Edward C. Cole, discharged for disability, Oct. 21, 1862.

Warren Easton, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

Horace J. Easton, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Levi Gilespie, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 1, 1863.

Joshua P. Iart, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., March 30, 1862.

William S. Harris, died of disease, Dec. 31, 1862.

Harvey A. Havens, discharged by order, June 30, 1865.

Benjamin L. Harper, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

John P. Hart, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Jay R. Lathrop, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., March 31, 1862.

Theodore V. Linderman, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Samuel Lightner, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

James B. Miller, discharged for disability, Oct. 26, 1862.

George Nickols, died of disease near Corinth, Miss., May 26, 1862.

Samuel A. Owen, discharged for disability, May 13, 1862.

David A. Randall, discharged for disability, July 18, 1862.

Ebenezer Rathbone, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., April 26, 1862.

Ira Smith, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Aaron D. Staley, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

Samuel S. Tyler, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., April 20, 1862.

Geo. W. Tuttle, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 15, 1864.

George S. Tuft, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864.

George W. Wilber, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Cornelius S. Wbitcomb, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Frederick W. Williams, discharged at end of service, Jan. 16, 1865.

Company B.

Sergeant Calvin Hill, Yankee Springs; enlisted Oct. 2, 1861; discharged Sept. 8, 1862.

Corp. Geo. W. Knickerbocker, Yankee Springs; enlisted Oct. 8, 1861; veteran, Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Corp. Leander B. Pryor, Yankee Springs; enlisted Oct. 8, 1861; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Corp. Irwin L. Ross, Trowbridge; enlisted Oct. 7, 1861; discharged July 24, 1862.

Corp. Lewis Slater, Yankee Springs; enlisted Oct. 8, 1861; discharged Feb. 11, 1863.

Rollo Bishop, died of disease at Murfreesboro, Tenn., May 9, 1863.

Charles Bishop, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1861; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Littlejohn Baker, veteran, enlisted Feb. 13, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

John D. Bishop, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Rockwell D. Corwin, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Joseph Case, died of disease at Bardstown, Ky., April 26, 1862.

Andrew J. Case, discharged at end of service, March 24, 1865.

John B. Crandall, discharged by order, June 15, 1865.

William F. Edgitt, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Thomas A. Hubbard, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Richard Hecox, died of disease at Prairieville, Michigan, Jan. 18, 1862.

John C. Henry, died of disease at Murfreesboro, Tenn., March 18, 1863.

Newton Hubbard, discharged for disability, May 23, 1862.

Henry W. Knickerbocker, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Alva J. Morehouse, died of disease at Illinois, Nov. 18, 1862.

Squire M. Nichols, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Edward Pryor, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., April 5, 1862.

Orville J, Pryor, died of disease at Detroit, Michigan, Feb. 17, 1865.

Robert E. Pryor, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Leonard E. Perry, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864.

Leander B. Pryor, discharged for disability, March 7, 1863.

Orwin Potter, discharged for disability, Feb. 22, 1862.

Johnt W. Rodgers, discli. by order, June 8, 1865.

Charles H. Rodgers, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Orvis Stater, discharged at end of service, March 14, 1865.

Winton Smith, discharged May 27, 1862.

Henry Smith, discharged for disability, May 21, 1862.

William B. Williams, discharged for disability, May 21, 1862.

Joseph J. Wrist, discharged for disability, May 21, 1862.

Harrison C. Wrist, discharged for disability, May 21, 1862.

John Withey, discharged for disability, Feb. 1, 1863.

Francis Withey, mustered out July 25, 1865.

William Withey, killed in action at Stone River, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1862.

Francis Young, died of disease at Kalamuazoo, Michigan, Feb. 14, 1862.

Company C.

Milo Bunce, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Isaac Burget, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

James H. Durkee, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

Franklin A. Durfee, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

William O. Hurd, discharged by order, May 26, 1865.

Jacob Heaton, discharged by order, June 22, 1865.

George Hindmarch, died of disease at Gallatin, Dec. 19, 1862.

Horace E. Ludlow, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

John W. Pryor, died of disease, June 26, 1865.

Stephen V. Wheaton, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Company D.

Captain Daniel B. Hosmer, Castleton; enlisted June 19, 1863; 2d Lieutenant, Sept. 17, 1862; Sergeant; killed in action at Chickamauga, Tenn., Sept. 19, 1863.

Robert E. Ferguson, veteran, enlisted Jan. 18, 1864.

Company E.

George H. Durkee, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Cyrus A. Morse, discharged May 15, 1865.

William McConley, discharged by order, May 19, 1865.

Henry P. Ralston, discharged by order, Jan. 16, 1865.

Company F.

Dewitt C. Dye, discharged Feb. 24, 1863.

Company G.

Calvin P. Angell, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

Lyman C. Angell, died of disease, Dec. 2, 1864.

Richard Blucher, died of disease at Huntsville, Ala., Aug. 27, 1862.

Thomas Besinger, discharged for disability, July 18, 1862.

William H. Mead, discharged for disability, May 30, 1863.

Justice Mudge, died of disease at Milledgeville, Ga., Dec. 4, 1864.

George A. Willard, died of wounds at Murfreesboro, Tenn., Jan. 4, 1863.

Company H.

Corp. Geo. P. Coon, Orangeville; enlisted Dec. 20, 1861; discharged April 8, 1863.

Celo C. Colley, discharged for disability, Aug. 7, 1865.

Jehiel Chalker, discharged by order, June 8, 1865.

Joln Daggett, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., April 12, 1862.

George H. Ford, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, May 1, 1864.

William H. Gilbert, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps.

Jesse McVane, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Benjamin Smith, discharged at end of service, April 7, 1865.

James H. Smith, veteran, eul. January, 1864.

Company I.

Benjamin Jones, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 28, 1864.

Company K.

George W. Boen, died of disease at Savannal, Ga., Feb. 2, 1865.

Wallace Coryden, discharged by order, June 9, 1865.

William P. Sidman, discharged by order, May 6, 1865.

Jacob Young, died of disease at Savannah, Ga., Feb. 7, 1865.

FOURTEENTH, SEVENTEENTH, AND NINETEENTH INFANTRY.

The Fourteenth goes to Northern Mississippi-Brigaded for the War -Arduous Service in Tennessee-The Long Combat from Dallas to Atlanta-The March to the Sea-Through the Carolinas-Muster out-Allegan County Members-Barry County Members-The Gallant Seventeenth-Company D, from Allegan and Barry-Off to the War-Attacking the Enemy-Brilliant Success-Heavy Loss-Battle of Antietam-Through the Winter in Virginia-Under Grant in Mississippi-Back to Kentucky-With Burnside to East Tennessee -The Campaign of the Wilderness-Hard Fight at Spottsylvania -Engineer Duty-Subsequent Services-Muster out-Members from Allegan County-Members from Barry County-Organization and Departure of the Nineteenth Infantry-On Duty in Kentucky -Transferred to Army of the Cumberland-Ordered to Franklin, Tenn.-The Brigade on a Reconnoissance-Attacked by Seven Brigades of Cavalry-A Long and Desperate Fight-The Enemy again and again repulsed-Ammunition exhausted-New Rebel Forces appear-Unionists compelled to surrender-Exchanged and Reorganized-Services in Tennessee-Captures a Battery at Resaca -Its Colonel killed-Averysboro and Bentonville-The CloseAllegan County Officers and Men-

Members from Barry County.

FOURTEENTH INFANTRY.

THE Fourteenth Infantry, which represented many portions of the State, was mustered into service at Ypsilanti, Feb. 13, 1862, and left for the seat of war in Northern Mississippi on the 17th of April following.

At Hamburg Landing, Miss., it was assigned to Gen. Pope's Army of the Mississippi, and joined a brigade made up of the Tenth, Sixteenth, and Sixtieth Illinois Infantry, and the Tenth and Fourteenth Michigan Infantry, of which it was composed during the remainder of the war, except that the Tenth Illinois gave place, in July, 1864, to the Seventeenth New York.

After the retreat of Beauregard from Corinth the brigade was employed in various duties in Northern Alabama and Mississippi until September, 1862, when, with Gen. J. M. Palmer's division, it marched to Nashville, Tenn., and assisted to hold that place while Buell was advancing toward Louisville, Ky.

After Gen. Rosecrans assumed command of the Department of the Cumberland, and marched his forces from Kentucky to the relief of Nashville, Palmer's division was transferred from the Army of the Mississippi to the Army of the Cumberland, and thereafter the regiments composing it operated in the Department of the Cumberland.

The Fourteenth performed arduous service until the close of the war.

It served as mounted infantry in Tennessee from September; 1863, until the spring of 1864, when it re-enlisted, and after the usual veteran furlough rejoined its brigade at Dallas, Ga., June 4, 1864.

It then participated in all the movements of the Army of the Cumberland until the fall of Atlanta.

On the 16th of November, with the brigade, it moved southward from Atlanta on the march "through Georgia," assisted in the capture of Savannah, and thence, in January, 1865, with its command,-viz., First Brigade, Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, proceeded northward through the Carolinas.

At Averysboro' and Bentonville, N. C., the brigade particularly distinguished itself. (See history of Thirteenth Infantry.)

After the surrender of Johnston the command marched to Washington, D. C., vid Raleigh and Richmond.

It passed in review at the National capital, May 14th, and on the 13th of June proceeded, via the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, to Parkersburg, W. Va.; going thence by steamer to Louisville, Ky., where it was mustered out of the service on the 18th of July, 1865.

It arrived at Jackson, Michigan, on the 21st, and on the 29th of the same month was paid off and disbanded.

MEMBERS OF THE FOURTEENTH INFANTRY FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Company A.

M. D. Hulenberg, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Eli P. Spaulding, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Company B.

Nathaniel C. Austin, mustered out July 18, 1865.

James Conlan, discharged for wounds, June 5, 1865.

Moses Green, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Judson Kitchen, mustered out July 18, 1865.

John McCreery, mustered out July_8, 1865.

Company D.

Erastus N. Bates, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Ashel S. Carr, died of disease at Louisville, Ky., July 18, 1865.

Company E.

Nicholas Mateen, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Company F.

Sylvester Auway, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Geo. H. Leavitt, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Chas. H. White, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Company G.

Fred. Hoffer, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Lambert Van Valkenberg, discharged by order, June 27, 1865.

Company I.

Jerry Monroe, discharged by order, May 30, 1865.

Company B.

Harvey H. Austin, discharged by order, July 20, 1865.

Company D.

Thomas B. Luce, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Michael Roush, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Nelson Vanevery, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Company E.

Charles W. H. Cassady, mustered out July 18, 1865. William S. Sibbs, must out July 18, 1865.

David Roush, mustered out July 18, 1865.

SEVENTEENTH INFANTRY.

This gallant command, celebrated as the "Stonewall" regiment of Gen. Wilcox's division of the Ninth Army Corps, was organized at Detroit Barracks, in the summer of 1862, by State Inspector-General James E. Pittman.

Its original commanding officer, Col. William H. Withington, was commissioned Aug. 11, 1862, and on the 21st of the same month the regiment was mustered into the United States service for three years.

Company D embraced a large majority of the members of the regiment from Allegan and Barry Counties. Under the command of Col. Withington, the regiment left its rendezvous on the 27th of August, 1862, and proceeded directly to Washington.

Scarcely had it arrived at that place when it was assigned to Gen. Wilcox's division, and in less than three weeks from the time of leaving Michigan its members were gallantly battling for their country at South Mountain.

On the evening of the 13th of September the regiment marched from Frederick City, Md.,-where it had bivouacked the night before with the rest of the Ninth Army Corps,-over the National turnpike in the direction of South Mountain, and about midnight rested for a few hours not far from Middletown.

Before daybreak of the 14th Middletown was passed; the base of the mountain being reached about nine o'clock A.M.

The enemy was found in force on each side of a gap, holding each crest of the mountain, and strongly posted behind stone fences and other available shelter, with his batteries in commanding positions enfilading the main road.

The regiment was then ordered to advance up the Sharpsburg road.

This movement was executed in common by the whole of Wilcox's division, which proceeded far up towards the crest of the mountain and moved to the support of a section of Cook's battery, which had been sent up to open on the enemy's guns on the right of the gap.

The division was about to deploy, when the rebels suddenly opened at two hundred yards with a battery, throwing shot and shell, killing several in the regiment, and driving back the battery; the cannoniers of which, with their horses and limbers, rushed back through the ranks of the infantry, causing a temporary panic among some of the troops, that might have resulted in the loss of the guns had the enemy taken advantage of it.

The Seventeenth promptly changed front under a heavy fire, and moved out with the Seventy-Ninth New York to protect the battery, lying in line of battle until nearly four P.M., exposed to a severe fire from Drayton's brigade of South Carolina infantry, posted in its immediate front.

Being unable to reply to this fire, and having become impatient and anxious to advance, the order to charge upon the enemy was received with enthusiastic cheers.

The regiment, being on the extreme right of Wilcox's division, moved rapidly forward through an open field upon the enemy's position, under a terrific storm of lead and iron from the stone fences in front and the batteries on the right; then, with cheer after cheer, sent up in defiant answer to the peculiar rebel yell, the Seventeenth gallantly advanced to within easy musket-range without firing a shot.

It then opened a murderous fire upon the enemy, and, steadily advancing the extreme right of the regiment, it swung round, obtaining an enfilading fire upon the rebels intrenched behind the stone walls.

Unable to withstand this destructive fire, the enemy broke in confusion, and the left of the regiment charged over the walls with shouts of triumph, pursuing the fleeing remnants of Drayton's command over the crest and far down the mountain slope, gaining and holding the key-point of the battle-field.

The splendid valor and extraordinary coolness of the raw recruits of the Seventeenth in this engagement gave the regiment much celebrity, and this conflict has since been mentioned in history as one of the most brilliant achievements of the war.

The regiment suffered severely at South Mountain, having twenty-seven officers and men killed and one hundred and fourteen wounded.

Three days later, at Antietam, it was again hotly engaged, sustaining a loss of eighteen killed and eighty-seven wounded.

After following Lee's defeated army through Northern Virginia, and camping for a while at Falmouth, the regiment crossed the Rappahannock at Fredericksburg, but did not participate in the battle of that place.

It remained in the Army of the Potomac through the winter, but in the spring was ordered to Kentucky.

After a short stay in that State, it proceeded with the Ninth Army Corps to Mississippi, and joined Gen. Grant.

It was stationed at Haynes' Bluff and Milldale, and was slightly engaged before Jackson on the 10th of June.

It soon returned to Kentucky, and moved thence with Burnside's army into East Tennessee.

It took part in numerous movements and counter-movements for which the forces in East Tennessee became famous, and on the 16th of November was acting as the rear-guard of the army, which was falling back towards Knoxville.

While it was crossing Turkey Creek, near Campbell's Station, the enemy attacked in force, and a sharp engagement followed.

The Seventeenth, with its brigade, steadily covered the rear of the army, having twenty-six officers and men killed and wounded during the fight.

That night the whole Union force moved into Knoxville, and from then until the retreat of the enemy, on the 4th of December, the regiment was busily engaged in the defense of that place, suffering greatly from want of rations, but gallantly performing its duty.

After the defeat of the Confederates, the marching up and down the Tennessee Valley was resumed, and was kept up, with some intervals of rest, throughout the winter.

On the 20th of March, 1864, the regiment set out with the Ninth Corps from Knoxville, and marched over the Cumberland Mountains to Nicholasville, Ky., whence it moved at once to Maryland. With the same corps the Seventeenth passed through the great campaign of 1864.

It was sharply engaged in the Wilderness on the 6th of May, having forty-six men killed and wounded.

At Spottsylvania, on the 12th of May, the regiment charged gallantly on the rebel works, but was surrounded by a superior force in the dense woods, and had twenty-three killed, seventy-three wounded, and ninety-three taken prisoners, out of two hundred and twenty-five engaged.

So small a squad remained for duty that on the 16th of May it was detailed for engineer service, though still retaining its regimental number.

It served throughout the winter of 1864-65 either in this capacity or as provost-guard.

During the Confederate attack on Fort Steadman, however (March 25, 1865), the Seventeenth advanced as skirmishers, drove back the enemy's skirmishers, and captured sixty-five prisoners.

After the capture of Petersburg and the surrender of Lee the regiment moved north to Washington, set out for Michigan on the 4th of June, 1865, reached Detroit on the 7th, and was forthwith paid off and discharged at the latter place.

MEMBERS OF THE SEVENTEENTH INFANTRY FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Field and Staff.

Surg. Abram R. Calkins, Allegan; com. June 26, 1862; res. Oct. 14, 1862.

Company D.

1st Lieutenant Wm. H. White, Wayland; com. June 17, 1862; res. March 20, 1863.

Corp. Chas. Parsons, Wayland; enlisted July 31, 1862; died of disease at Lebanon, Ky., April 25, 1853.

Corp. Peter J. Murphy, Wayland; enlisted July 31, 1862; mustered out June 3, 1865.

Orville Slade, Wayland; enlisted Aug. 7, 1862; killed in action at Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862.

Daniel Ball, discharged for disability, Jan. 30, 1863.

Calvin Ball, discharged for disability, April 28, 1863.

Chas. L. Burrell, promoted in U. S. C. T., Nov. 3, 1863.

Myron Burrell, tralns. to Vet. Res. Corps, March 15, 1864.

Wm. M. Coleman, discharged for disability, Oct. 25, 1864.

Cornelius Devenwater, discharged for disability, Jan. 4, 1863.

Richard Dennis, died at Weverton, Md., Nov. 4, 1862.

Luther E. Ellis, discharged for disability, Jan. 15, 1863.

Joseph G. Fenner, discharged for disability, Jan. 11, 1863.

Saml. Potter, died of wounds near Jackson, Miss., Oct. 28, 1862.

Wm. Parker, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Stephen Springer, mustered out June 3, 1865. E

dward H. Schofield, discharged for disability, Dec. 7, 1862.

John Truax, discharged by order, May 10, 1865.

Henry Tomlinson, killed in action at South Mountain, Sept. 14, 1862.

Benj. Ward, killed in action at South Mountain, Sept. 14, 1862.

Martin White, mustered out July 18, 1865.

Company E.

Sergeant Philo M. Lonsbury, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 1, 1862; absent sick at muster out.

Musician Jas. C. Leggett, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; mustered out June 3, 1865.

Herbert W. Lonsbury, Allegan; killed in action at Spottsylvania, May 12, 1864.

Company I.

Hiram Bushnell, died of wounds.

Samuel Buchanan, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Alfred Cook, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Oliver P. Carmen, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Levi B. Davis, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Jas. Hibberdine, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Geo. Kitchen, discharged for disability, Nov. 3, 1862.

David V. Lily, (lied in action at South Mountain, Sept. 14, 1862.

Frederick Leonard, discharged for disability, Jan. 1, 1863.

James V. Orton, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Samuel Parker, died of disease at Covington, Ky., April 9, 1865.

Daniel Polk, discharged by order, May 12, 1865.

Penter Ross, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Nahum Snow, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Alvin H. Stillson, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Simon Starring, mustered out June 3, 1865.

M. V. B. Smith, died of disease at Memphis, June 24, 1863.

BARRY COUNTY MEMBERS OF THE SEVENTEENTH INFANTRY.

Company D.

2d Lieutenant David L. Morthland, Barry; mustered out as Sergeant, June 3, 1865.

Sergeant Wallace H. Scoville, Johnston; discharged for disability, Feb. 25, 1863.

Musician James Goodman, Hastings; discharged by order, Sept. 16, 1862.

Andrew E. Breese, discharged for disability.

David Brotherton, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Jalo W. Convin, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Charles W. Convin, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Zenas S. Clark, died of disease at Newport News, Va., March 17, 1865.

Charles D. Cowles, discharged for disability, Jan. 30, 1865.

Charles Dickinson, discharged for disability, Oct. 25, 1864

Hector M. Dodge, mustered out June 3, 1865.

David Eldridge, died in action at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1865.

W. S. Hinckley, discharged for disability, April 10, 1863. D

aniel Hoffman, discb. for disability, Jan. 6, 1863.

William H. Hoffman, died of disease at Washington, D. C., Nov. 28, 1862.

Martin Moore, killed in action at South Mountain, Sept. 14, 1862.

Herman W. Manford, transferred to navy.

John P. Manning, mustered out June 3, 1865.

A. Palmatier, killed in action at South Mountain, Md., Sept. 14, 1862.

Nathan F. Powers, died of disease at Big Spring Hospital, Oct. 28, 1862.

Harlan A. Poor, killed in action at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864.

William W. Seebore, discharged for wounds received, Sept. 14, 1862.

Charles Shoemaker, mustered out June 3, 1865.

Company H.

William H. Godsmark, discharged Dec. 31, 1862.

Jerome M. Lampman, discharged for disability, May 17, 1864.

Martin Mallet, discli. for disability, Jan. 4, 1865.

Isaac Vantyle, mustered out July 3, 1865.

NINETEENTH INFANTRY.

The Nineteenth Regiment of infantry was recruited during the summer of 1862 from the counties of Branch, St. Joseph, Cass, Berrien, Kalamazoo, Van Buren, and Allegan, Company B including within its ranks a large majority of those from the latter county.

The regimental rendezvous was at Dowagiac, Cass Co., where the regiment was mustered into the United States service on the 25th of August, 1862.

On the 14th of September following, under the command of Col. Henry C. Gilbert, the Nineteenth proceeded to Cincinnati, Ohio, thence to Nicholasville, Ky., and later, towards the close of the year, to Danville, Ky.

It was first assigned to duty with the Fourth Brigade, First Division, Army of the Ohio, which brigade, on the formation of the Department and Army of the Cumberland, was transferred to that army as part of the Reserve Corps.

The regiment moved from Danville early in February, 1863, and reached Nashville on the 7th, proceeding thence to Franklin, Tenn.

Immediately after, Col. Coburn's brigade, consisting of the Nineteenth Michigan, Thirty-Third and Eighty-Fifth Indiana, and the Twenty-Second Wisconsin Regiments of infantry, numbering fifteen hundred and eighty-seven men, strengthened by two hundred men of the One Hundred and Twenty-Fourth Ohio Infantry, with detachments of three regiments of Cavalry, about six hundred strong, and a full battery of artillery, moved out from Franklin on a reconnaissance in force.

After a march of about four miles the enemy's outposts were encountered, but they retired before the Union skirmishers, and the brigade bivouacked there for the night.

Resuming the march on the following day, the Union column found the enemy in force and strongly posted, at Thompson's Station, nine miles from Franklin.

At the point where the railroad crosses the turnpike the rebels opened fire on the forces of Col. Coburn, who immediately formed his men, and ordered a section of the battery to occupy a bill on the left of the road, sending the Nineteenth Michigan and the Twenty-Second Wisconsin to support it.

The Thirty-Third and Eighty-Fifth Indiana, with the other guns of the battery, took position on a hill at the right.

The enemy had two batteries posted on a range of hills three-fourths of a mile in front and south of the position occupied by Coburn's troops.

The Indiana regiments made a demonstration on the left of the enemy, to draw him out or charge his batteries, as circumstances might dictate.

This movement was made under a most galling fire from the enemy's batteries, and when the position was reached two entire brigades of dismounted rebel Cavalry were disclosed strongly posted behind stone walls and other defenses.

As it was found impossible to advance farther under the severe and incessant fire, these regiments were ordered to return to their former position on the hill, supported by a squadron of Cavalry; but for some unexplained reason the Cavalry failed to occupy the supporting position, as intended.

No sooner had the two regiments commenced to fall back than they were pursued by two rebel regiments, firing rapid volleys into the retiring Union force, which was at the same time under fire from the enemy's artillery.

But as soon as they reached the hill the Indianans turned upon their rebel pursuers and drove them back on the run; killing Col. Earle, of Arkansas.

The enemy rallied, charged desperately, and was again handsomely repulsed; but it soon became evident that Col. Coburn's command had here encountered the entire Cavalry force of Bragg's army, eighteen thousand strong, consisting of brigades commanded respectively by Gens. Forrest, Wheeler, French, Armstrong, Jackson, Crosby, and Martin, all under the command of Gen. Van Dorn.

The enemy, under Forrest, then advanced on the position occupied by the Nineteenth Michigan and its companion regiment, the Twenty-Second Wisconsin.

At the time the attack was made the section of artillery posted with these regiments hurriedly left its position, and at the same time three companies of the Wisconsin regiment, with their lieutenant-colonel (Bloodgood), abandoned the field without orders, moving off by the left flank, and joining the retreating Union Cavalry and artillery.

The Nineteenth Michigan and the remainder of the Twenty-Second Wisconsin, however, bravely poured in their fire, and held their assailants at bay fully twenty minutes. Forrest, checked in his advance, made a circuit to the east with his whole force, beyond the ground occupied by Col. Coburn, with the intention of turning his (Coburn's) left flank.

The Nineteenth and Twenty-Second were then moved to the west side of the turnpike, leaving the Thirty-Third and Eighty-Fifth Indiana to protect the southern acclivity of the hill.

The four regiments had scarcely formed in line behind the crest when Armstrong's rebel brigade charged from the east and the Texans from the south.

The battle now became terrific.

Three times the enemy charged gallantly up the hill, and thrice was he forced back with severe loss.

In one of these charges the colors of the Fourth Mississippi were captured by the Nineteenth Michigan.

The fighting became still more desperate.

The enemy, having gained possession of the hill on the east of the road, was sweeping the Northern ranks with canister, and, bravely as the Union troops fought, it soon became evident that the struggle was hopeless.

Their ammunition was nearly exhausted, and Forrest, who had already cut them off from Franklin, was advancing on their rear. Col. Coburn faced his command to the north to repel this new danger, and thus Forrest was held in check until the Union men had expended their last round of ammunition.

Then the brave band fixed bayonets, determined to charge through the enemy's lines and escape; but just then it was discovered that still another line lay in reserve, and still another battery opened on them from an unexpected quarter.

Escape was now hopeless, and to avoid a further and useless loss of life the command surrendered. Col. Gilbert had had his horse shot under him in the early part of the fight, and throughout all the fierce engagement had borne himself most gallantly.

When he offered his sword to the Confederate commander the latter declined to receive it, with the remark that "so brave an officer, commanding so gallant a regiment, deserves to retain his arms."

A part of the Nineteenth had escaped capture at Thompson's Station.

This small body, with those who had been left in camp at Franklin, were sent to Brentwood, organized with the remaining fragments of the brigade, and placed under command of an officer of another regiment.

This force was surrendered to the rebel general Forrest on the 25th of March, 1863, without the firing of a gun.

The enlisted men were soon paroled and sent North; the commissioned officers were exchanged on the 25th of May following.

The regiment was reorganized at Camp Chase, Ohio, and on the 8th of June, 1863, left Columbus to engage once more in service at the front.

It reached Nashville on the 11th, and from that time was employed in ordinary camp and picket duty until July, when it formed a part of Rosecrans' column advancing on Tullahoma.

The regiment was ordered back to Murfreesboro on the 23d of July, to do garrison duty in the fortifications at that point and along Stone River, where Company D was captured on the 5th of October by a rebel Cavalry force, under Gen. Wheeler.

After having been plundered, the men were released on parole.

About the last of October the Nineteenth was ordered to McMinnville, Tenn., where it remained engaged in the construction of fortifications and similar duty until the 21st of April, 1864, when it was ordered to join its division and march with the strong columns of Sherman into Georgia.

It reached Lookout Valley on the 30th, and moved forward with the army on the 3rd of May, being then in the Twentieth Army Corps.

Moving by way of Buzzard Roost and Snake Creek Gap to Resaca, it was, of five hundred and twelve officers and men who went into action, one hundred and thirteen were killed and wounded.

With its brigade, desperately engaged in the battle at that place on the 15th; on which occasion it gallantly charged and captured a battery of the enemy, afterwards holding the position against all efforts to retake it.

It was in that charge that Col. Gilbert received the wound from which he died at Chattanooga, on the 24th of May.

The total loss of the Nineteenth in killed and wounded was eighty-one.

The regiment was also engaged at Cassville, Ga., on the 19th of May, at New Hope Church on the 25th, at Golgotha on the 15th of June, and at Culp's Farm on the 22d of June; having in these engagements eighty-three officers and men killed and wounded.

Joining in the pursuit of the enemy after his evacuation of the position and works at Kenesaw Mountain, the Nineteenth, then under command of Major John J. Baker, crossed the Chattahoochee and took part in the battle of Peach-Tree Creek, on the 20th of July, in which its loss was thirty-nine killed, among the latter being its commander, Major Baker.

During the remainder of the siege of Atlanta the regiment was constantly on duty, much of the time under artillery-fire; its loss during that time being eight killed and wounded.

In the early days of November, 1864, the Nineteenth was quartered in the city of Atlanta, and on the 15th of that month moved with its brigade (the Second of the Third Division, Twentieth Corps) on the storied march to Savannah; taking an active part in the siege of that city, until its evacuation on the 21st of December.

It remained near Savannah until Jan. 1, 1865, when, with the companion regiments of its command, it moved across the Savannah River into South Carolina.

It crossed the Pedee River at Cheraw on the 2d of February, arrived at Fayetteville March 11th, assisted to destroy the arsenal and other public buildings at that place, and moved thence toward Raleigh.

On the 16th the enemy was found in heavy force at Averysboro'.

Here the Second Brigade was ordered to assault the works, and carried them with great gallantry, capturing the guns and a large number of prisoners, the loss of the Nineteenth being nineteen in killed and wounded.

During the battle of Bentonville, on the 19th of March, the regiment stood in line of battle, but was not engaged.

From Bentonville the regiment moved to Goldsboro', arriving there on the 24th of March, and then marched to Raleigh.

Here it remained until the war was virtually closed by the surrender of Johnston's army.

Then, with its corps, it faced northward and marched through Virginia to Alexandria, where it arrived on the 18th of May.

Six days later it marched with the bronzed and battered veteran's of Sherman's army, on the 24th of May, through the streets of the national capital.

From that time it remained in camp near Washington till June 10th, when it was mustered out of the service and ordered to Michigan.

Covered with honor, the men of the Nineteenth returned to Jackson, and were there paid off and discharged, on or about the 15th of June, 1865.

ALLEGAN COUNTY OFFICERS AND MEN.

Non-Commissioned Staff.

Q.M.-Sergeant George L. Clark, Allegan; enlisted June 1, 1863; promoted in U. S. C.T. June 20, 1864.

Company A.

Captain Joel H. Smith, Allegan; com. July 28, 1862; res. July 11, 1864.

Herman F. Dibble, died in action at Resaca, Ga., May 15, 1864.

Company B.

Captain Samuel M. Hubbard, Otsego; com. June 24, 1863; 1st Lieutenant, May 1, 1863;

2d Lieutenant, Aug. 11, 1862; wounded in action May 28, 1864; hon. discharged Nov. 30, 1864.

1st Lieutenant William T. Darrow, Allegan; com. July 28, 1862; res. Feb. 6, 1863.

1st Lieutenant John W. Duel, Allegan; com. May 8, 1865; mustered out June 10, 1865.

2d Lieutenant Augustus Lily, Allegan; com. May 1, 1863; promoted to 1st Lieutenant May 15, 1864; discharged 2d Lieutenant, April 9, 1865.

2d Lieutenant Robert Mabbs, Allegan; mustered out as Sergeant, June 10, 1865.

Sergeant Jeremiah Dugan, Martin; enlisted Aug. 6, 1862; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Sergeant Phineas A. Hager, Otsego; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; died of wounds, Aug. 8, 1864.

Sergeant George L. Clark, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 11, 1862; appointed q.m-Sergeant, June 1, 1863. Sergeant Julius E. Bigsby, Heath; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; discharged for disability, June 22, 1863.

Sergeant John W. Duel, Otsego; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Corp. Robert A. Patterson, Martin; enlisted Aug. 8, 1862; mustered out June 10, 1865.

Corp. David R. Anderson, Otsego; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; discharged for disability, Aug. 9, 1864.

Corp. Pascal A. Pullman, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 4, 1862; died in action in Georgia, July 20, 1864.

Corp. George L. Baird, Otsego; enlisted Aug. 11, 1862; discharged for disability, Oct. 6, 1864.

Corp. David 0. Brown, Martin; enlisted Aug. 6, 1862; mustered out June 10, 1865.

Corp. Joseph W. Ely, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 8, 1862; mustered out June 10, 1865.

Corp. John J. Young, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; mustered out June 10, 1865.

Musician Benjamin F. Chapin; Cheshire; enlisted Aug. 7, 1862; absent sick.

Musician James J. Bachelder, Martin; enlisted Aug. 8, 1862; mustered out June 10, 1865.

Musician Martin R. Parkhurst, Heath; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; mustered out June 10, 1865.

John Ailes, mustered out June 10, 1865. Emerson Allen, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Judson L. Austin, mustered out May 26, 1865.

Pascal L. Austin, died in action at Thompson's Station, Tenn., March 5, 1863.

William Anderson, discharged for disability, Jan. 10, 1865.

James Billings, discharged for disability, March, 1863.

Harvey Bell, discharged for disability, June 22, 1863.

Ilenry L. Blakeslee, died in action at Thompson's Station, Tenn., March 5, 1863.

John H. Brinkman, died of disease at Murfreesboro, Tenn., Dec. 26, 1863.

Ansel T. Baird, mustered out June 30, 1865.

Edward A. Baird, mustered out July 10, 1865.

Milo H. Barker, mustered out June 10, 1865.

David Bellinger, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Horace C. Beverly, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Alplieus G. Bradley, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Henry W. Brown, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Sidney Brundage, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Carlos Baker, mustered out July 10, 1865.

Todorus Botren, mustered out July 14, 1865.

Guilford D. Case, died of disease at Nicholasville, Ky., Dec. 27, 1862.

Frederick Campbell, died in action at Altoona, Ga., May 25, 1864.

Timothy Dygert, mustered out June 30, 1865.

Henry W. Durand, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Albert French, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Edwin Griffin, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Jacob Gunsaul, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Jerome Green, died of disease at Annapolis, Md., March 3, 1863.

Leander S. Goff, died in prison at Richmond, Va., March 3, 1863. J

ohn H. Howard, died of disease at Cincinnati, Ohio, November, 1862.

John Hogle, mustered out June 15, 1865.

Charles H. llogeboom, mustered out June 15, 1865.

Martin M. Jones, died of wounds at Louisville, Ky., July 18, 1864.

Isaac M. Kinney, died of disease at Danville, Ky., Feb. 10, 1863.

Joel R. Kuper, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., March, 1863.

Stephen Knapp, discharged for disability, March 27, 1865.

Thomas R. Kincaid, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Egbert Kluffman, mustered out June 15, 1865.

Neil Livingston, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Garrett Lohies, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Alfred Leonard, died of disease at Nashville, March, 1863.

W. Merchant, died of disease at Annapolis, March, 1863.

James McIntee, died of wounds at Columbia, Tenn., April 20, 1863.

Donald McLeod, discharged for disability, Oct. 6, 1864.

William Manchester, transferred to 10th Inf.

James H. Martin, mustered out June 15, 1865.

George A. Martin, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Lawrence Montague, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Eldridge Morris, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Thomas McCormick, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Carlton Norton, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Henry Noble, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Francis C. Newton, transferred to 10th Inf.

John B. Nelson, died of disease at McMinnville, Tenn., March 20, 1864.

Stephen Ostrander, mustered out June 22, 1865.

Harvey Pullman, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Erastus Purdy, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Charles H. Prentiss, mustered out June 3, 1865.

George W. Platt, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Elisha Platt, mustered out May 26, 1865.

Comstock H. Platt, discharged for disability, Feb. 28, 1865.

Newton S. Peabody, died of disease at Danville, Ky., Feb. 1, 1863.

Vernon A. Rose, died of disease in Indiana, June 18, 1864.

John Rutgers, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Peter Starring, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Stephen Sampson, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Benjamin Stephens, mustered out June 10, 1865.

S. B. Stephens, died of disease in Indiana, Feb. 13, 1863.

Charles Southworth, died of disease at Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 17, 1864.

John Southwell, discharged for disability, June 22, 1863.

Solomon Springer, discharged for disability, Feb. 4, 1863.

Andrew Schoener, discharged for disability, June 22, 1863.

Joseph A. Trutsch, mustered out May 24, 1865.

Charles L. Vahen, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Norman Wilson, died of disease at Lexington, Ky., Dec. 20, 1862.

William Watson, died of disease in Michigan, July 18, 1863.

Cyrus B. Wheeler, died of wounds, Aug. 3, 1864.

Henry W. Wilcox, transferred to Mississippi marines.

Company F.

Musician Charles W. Owen, Martin; enlisted Aug. 14, 1862; mustered out June 10, 1865.

Company G.

Eli B. Baker, transferred to 10th Inf.

Benjamin Brown, transferred to 10th Inf.

William C. McLeod, transferred to 10th Inf.

Company K.

A. J. Myers, discharged for disability, March 31, 1863.

MEMBERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company E.

William Henry, transferred to 10th Michigan Inf.

George Ii. Martin, transferred to 10th Michigan Inf.

Hiram Rodgers, died of wounds at Chattanooga, Tenn., July 21, 1864.

George H. Snyder, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps.

John W. Snyder, transferred to 10th Michigan Inf.

Henry Smith, transferred to 10th Michigan Inf.

Walter Searles, mustered out July 15, 1865.

Company F.

William H. Allen, died July 20, 1864.

Mylon Angel, mustered out June 10, 186.5.

David N. Griffith, mustered out June 1(0, 1865.

John B. Nichols, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Thomas Pennock, discharged for disability, July 1, 1863.

Austin Smith, died of disease at Annapolis, Md., April 1, 1863.

David Searles, transferred to 10th Michigan Inf.

James Searles, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Otis P. Taller, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Company G.

Alonzo P. Beaman, transferred to 10th Michigan Inf.

George H. Clark, transferred to 10th Michigan Inf.

Company K.

William Harvey, mustered out June 10, 1865.

TWENTY-FIRST, TWENTY-EIGHTH, AND THIRTIETH INFANTRY.

The Big District which sent out the Twenty-First Infantry-Company C from Barry County-The Regiment joins Buell-Battle of Perryville-Battle of Stone River-Death of Captain Fitzgerald - Gallantry of Sheridan's Division-

The Advance through Tennessee -Battle of Chickamauga-Subsequent Service in Company with the Thirteenth Infantry-Battle of Bentonville-Officers and Soldiers from Barry County-The Twenty-Eighth Infantry goes to the Front in 1864-Battle of Nashville-Ordered to North Carolina, Fight at Wise's Forks-Subsequent Services-Muster out-Members from Allegan County-Members from Barry County-Thirtieth Infantry raised to protect Frontier-Its Services-Members from Allegan County-Members from Barry County.

TWENTY-FIRST INFANTRY.

This regiment, which so nobly distinguished itself on several hard-fought fields during the war for the Union, was recruited in the summer of 1862 from the Fourth Congressional District.

The unit was a very large one, comprising the counties of Barry, Ionia, Montcalm, Kent, Ottawa, Muskegon, Oceana, Newaygo, Mecosta, Mason, Manistee, Grand Traverse, Leelenaw, Manitou, Oceola, Emmet, Mackinac, Delta, and Cheboygan.

Ionia was the place of rendezvous, and, until the regiment was organized.

J. B. Welch, Esq., was the commandant of the camp. Company C, which was led into the field by the brave Captain Leonard O. Fitzgerald, of Hastings and was Barry's representation in the Twenty-First.

The regiment was mustered into the United States service Sept. 4, 1862, and eight days later.

The 21st consisted of one thousand and eight officers and enlisted men, commanded by Col. Ambrose A. Stevens, left Ionia, with orders to report at Cincinnati.

It was immediately pushed forward to join Gen. Buell's forces in Kentucky, and on the 8th of October, as part of Gen. Sheridan's division, was engaged in the battle of Perryville, where it suffered a loss of twenty-seven men killed, wounded, and missing.

With other troops of Gen. Rosecrans' command it then marched forward to Nashville, Tenn., where it arrived Nov. 10, 1862.

On the 26th of December, as part of Gen. Sill's brigade, of Sheridan's division, it moved forward with Gen. Rosecrans' army to attack Bragg, then lying in front of Murfreesboro.

In the great battle of three days' duration which ensued on the banks of Stone River, during the last day of December, 1862, and the 1st and 2d of January, 1863, the Twenty-First covered itself with glory; suffering a loss, however, of one hundred and thirty-nine brave men, killed, wounded, and missing.

Among those who relinquished their command on that field and joined the battalions gone before was Captain Fitzgerald, of Company C, who was mortally wounded on the 31st of December, and died at Nashville on the 8th of January following.

In the terrific engagement fought on the morning of December 31st, which was commenced by Cheatham's, Cleburn's, and McGown's rebel divisions of Hardee's corps, which fell unexpectedly on McCook, who commanded the right wing of the national forces, first Johnson's and then Davis' division was driven back in inextricable disorder.

Their defeat was almost simultaneous with the attack, and upon Sheridan's division of McCook's corps-composed of Sill's, Roberts', and Shaefer's brigades-devolved the task of checking the impetuous onset of the victorious foe.

This single division, outflanked and surrounded by panic-stricken fugitives, must give battle to three divisions of a triumphant and exultant enemy, and must at least hold them in check until the general in command could make dispositions to meet the terrible emergency.

Most nobly did Gen. Sheridan and his division fulfill their task.

Four times they repulsed the rebel host.

Surrounded, outflanked, outnumbered, in danger of utter destruction, and pressed back into the cedar thickets in their rear, they fought on till one-fourth of their number lay bleeding and dying upon the field,-till two out of three of their brigade commanders were killed,-till every gun and cartridge-box was empty, and then they retired slowly, steadily, and in good order.

As they passed Gen. Rosecrans, while deliberately falling back to make way for reinforcements, Gen. Sheridan was heard to say to his commanding general, with touching pathos, " Here is all that is left of us, general."

His men were even then clamoring for ammunition, and an hour later were again in line of battle.

His division consisted of six thousand four hundred and ninety-five men.

They lost in that fearful conflict among the cedars seventeen hundred in killed, wounded, and missing, including seventy officers, two of whom were brigadiers, and the only remaining brigadier fell before nightfall.

After the defeat of Bragg's army at Stone River, the Twenty-First remained in the vicinity of Murfreesboro, employed on picket duty and as guard for forage-trains, until June 24th, when, commanded by Col. William B. McCreery, it advanced with Rosecrans on Tullahoma.

During July it was located at Cowan and Anderson, stations on the line of the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad.

Subsequently it occupied Bridgeport, Ala., under Gen. Lytle, who succeeded to the command of the brigade after the death of Gen. Sill at Stone River.

On the 2d of September the command crossed the Tennessee River, and advanced with the corps of Major-Gen. McCook to Trenton, Ga., whence it crossed the mountains to Alpine, thence made a forced march between mountain ranges towards Chattanooga, and on the 19th of September the regiment was formed in line of battle at Chickamauga.

During the succeeding day the Twenty-First, with other regiments of Sheridan's division, stubbornly contested the rebel advance on the field of Chickamauga, but with its shattered corps was finally compelled to fall back to Chattanooga, after sustaining a loss of one hundred and seven officers and men in killed, wounded, and missing.

Of the thirty-five missing, twenty-one were known to be wounded.

Among the wounded and captured was Col. McCreery, while Lieutenant-Col. Morris B. Wells was left dead on the field.

Gen. Lytle, the brigade commander, was also killed.

On the 5th of November this regiment, the Thirteenth and Twenty-Second Michigan Infantry, and the Eighteenth Ohio Infantry were organized as an engineer brigade, and from that time until Sherman's victorious armies marched into the national capital, in May, 1865, the field-services of the Thirteenth and Twenty-First Michigan Infantry were performed side by side, both regiments performing engineer duty for a period of five months, and both being assigned to the Second Brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, early in November, 1864. (See history of the Thirteenth Infantry.)

At Bentonville, N. C., on the 19th of March, 1865, the regiment was heavily engaged, losing six commissioned officers and eighty-six enlisted men killed and wounded, out of two hundred and thirty present in action.

The Twenty-First participated in the grand review at Washington, D. C., May 24, 1865.

It was there mustered out of service June 8th, arrived at Detroit, Michigan, on the 13th, and on the 22d of the same month was paid and disbanded.

OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Field and Staff and Non-Commissioned Staff.

Chaplain Theo. Pillsbury, Hastings; com. Aug. 29, 1862; res. Dec. 15, 1862.

Com. Sergeant Horatio G. Steadman, Thornapple; enlisted Nov. 1, 1864; mustered out June 8, 1865.

Company A.

George Adgate, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Richard Benjamin, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Albert W. Dillenbeck, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Newell Hotchkiss, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Wallace Lovewell, discharged for disability, May 30, 1863.

John Rowleader, discharged for disability, May 13, 1863.

Company B.

Captain L. C. Fitzgerald, Hastings; com. July 30, 1862; killed in action at Stone River, Dec. 31, 1862.

1st Lieutenant Perry Chance, Hastings; com. July 30, 1862; res. Jan. 17, 1863.

2d Lieutenant Marion C. Russell, Hastings; con. July 30, 1862; res. Feb. 25, 1863.

2d Lieutenant James Houghtalin, Hastings; com. Jan. 17, 1863; res. June 11, 1864.

Sergeant Henry H. Striker, Baltimore; enlisted July 21, 1862; died at Danville, Ky., Oct. 28, 1862.

Sergeant Wm. H. H. Powers, Hastings; enl. July 21, 1862; discharged for disability, May 1, 1863.

Sergeant Jas. Houghtalin, enlisted July 21, 1862; promoted to 2d lieut.

Sergeant Geo. Miller, Hastings; enlisted July 26, 1862; died of disease at Cincinnati, Ohio, Nov. 25, 1863.

Sergeant Ilor. G. Steadman, Thornapple; enlisted July 13, 1862; promoted to com. Sergeant, Nov. 1, 1864

Corp. Jas. H. Smith, Woodland; enlisted Aug. 5, 1862; died of disease, May 6, 1863.

Corp. Chas. Miller, Castleton; enlisted July 26, 1862; discharged for disability, March 31, 1863.

Corp. Jas. H. Foote, Thornapple; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; died at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 28, 1863.

Corp. John H. Mills, Woodland; enlisted Aug. 1, 1862; mustered out June 8, 1865.

Corp. Justus Mudge, Castleton; enlisted Aug. 8, 1862; discharged by order, Oct. 2, 1862.

Corp. Wallace W. Stillson, Hastings; enlisted July 26, 1862; mustered out May 31, 1865.

Musician Robt. D. Searles, Thornapple; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; discharged for disability, April 23, 1863.

Musician Leslie T. Mosely, Thornapple; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; mustered out June 8, 1865.

Wagoner Chas. Loomis, Thornapple; enlisted Aug. 9, 1862; died at Nashville, Tenn., June 8, 1863.

Edson Andrus, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 8, 1863.

W. H. Bennett, died of disease.

Tracy Baldwin, died of disease at Bowling Green, Ky., Dec. 8, 1862.

Alfred Baldwin, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 30, 1864.

Daniel D. Brown, discharged for disability, Oct. 29, 1862.

Henry C. Bronson, discharged for disability, March 11, 1863.

Nathaniel Barbour, discharged to enlisted in marine service, March 11, 1863.

George Brown, missing at Chickamauga, Tenn., Sept. 20, 1863.

Americus Barnum, mustered out July 5, 1865.

John Bolton, mustered out June 8, 1865.

David C. Bussell, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Aug. 1, 1863; mustered out Aug. 2, 1865.

James R. Chase, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Alexander T. Cramer, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Harrison Carpenter, discharged for disability, Nov. 8, 1862.

William J. Crablb, died of wounds at Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 9, 1863.

Andrew M. Cure, died of disease at Murfreesboro, Tenn., April 19, 1863.

Henry Demund, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1862.

Vinal Dean, died of wounds at Chattanooga, Tenn., Oct. 10, 1863.

Philander Durkee, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Sept. 1, 1863.

Asa B. Durkee, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Silas Foster, mustered out June 8, 1865.

John Fisher, discharged for disability, Aug. 11, 1863.

Benjamin L. Francisco, discharged for disability, Nov. 18, 1862.

Leon Fry, discharged to enlisted in marine service, Jan. 3, 1863.

David W. Fry, killed in action at Chattanooga, Tenn., Sept. 30, 1863.

Augustus M. Fontes, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., March 29, 1865.

James Gibson, died of disease at New York Harbor, April 25, 1865.

Eli Gleason, missing in action at Stone River, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1862.

Alfred Gibbs, mustered out June 8, 1865.

James B. Holis, mustered out June 27, 1865.

John H. Hall, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Hoel P. Hosier, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Frederick W. Harris, mustered out July 3, 1865.

Schuyler Heath, died of disease at Louisville, Ky., Feb. 13, 1865.

Myron Heath, died of disease at Andersonville prison, July 31, 1864.

David D. Hall, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., June 26, 1863.

Thomas J. Hallock, died of disease at Crab Orchard, Ky.

Lester M. Jones, died of wounds, Jan. 2, 1863.

David Jordan, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Nelson Kilmer, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Peter Kilmer, killed in action at Bentonville, N. C., March 19, 1865.

John A. Kelly, died of wounds at Murfreesboro, Tenn., March 23, 1863.

Edgar C. Leonard, discharged for disability, April 27, 1863.

Francis Mead, discharged for disability, Oct. 12, 1863.

James Moulton, discharged for disability, April 7, 1863.

Francis W. Maynard, discharged for disability, June 18, 1863.

Alexander McArthur, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1862.

Eber C. Moffitt, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1862.

John Mead, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 17, 1862.

Byron H. Melroy, died of disease at Murfreesboro, Tenn., May 19, 1863.

Leonard Mauch, killed in action at Bentonville, N. C., March 19, 1865.

Lewis Massacar, killed in action at Bentonville, N. C., March 19, 1865.

Robert Mitchell, killed in action at Bentonville, N. C., March 19, 1865.

James D. Miller, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Sept. 1, 1863; mustered out June 8, 1865.

William Miller, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Nelson J. Millard, mustered out July 7, 1865.

John Osborn, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps.

Joseph Osborn, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Henry G. Orwing, discharged for disability, Feb. 10, 1863.

Adam Pratt, discharged for disability, July 7, 1863.

Henry D. Pierce, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Calvin H. Palmer, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Allen Roush, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Thomas W. Roush, must out June 8, 1865.

George M. Reed, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Frederick Rickle, discharged for disability, Aug. 25, 1863.

Horatio N. Sackett, died of disease at Louisville, Ky., Oct. 28, 1862.

Daniel P. Sixberry, died of disease, March 3, 1865.

John Smith, died of wounds at Murfreesboro, Tenn., Feb. 16, 1863.

John F. Swaine, missing in action at Stone River, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1862.

Silas W. Steelman, discharged for disability, July 22, 1863.

George P. Sweet, discharged for disability, Oct. 16, 1863.

W. H. S. Smoke, mustered out June 12, 1865.

James H. Sawdy, mustered out June 23, 1865.

John C. Spencer, mustered out June 26, 1865.

John Strouse, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Anthony Thompson, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Byron W. Tomlinson, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Ansel S. Thrasher, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 6, 1862.

Elisha Tracy, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 15, 1863.

William Varney, mustered out June 8, 1865.

George Varney, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Michael Vanderhoof, mustered out July 5, 1865.

William B. Warner, mustered out June 8, 1865.

James Williams, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Isaac B. Wooley, mustered out May 30, 1865.

Company D.

Joseph Kilmer, died of disease at Bardstown, N. Y.

Jacob Young, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Company E.

2d Lieutenant Selden E. Turner, Hastings; com. July 30, 1862; res. Jan. 13, 1863.

Musician George Croninger, Thornapple; enlisted Aug. 11, 1862; transferred to Inv. Corps, Feb. 15, 1861.

William E. McConnell, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Benjamin R. Ogden, mustered out June 8, 1865.

Samuel F. Rosencrans, died of disease at Stone River, Tenn., March, 1862.

Company I.

1st Lieutenant Herman Hunt, Hastings; com. July 30, 1862; died of disease, Dec. 16, 1862.

Robert M. Gamble, mustered out June 8, 1865.

James M. Hale, discharged by order, April 15, 1863.

Charles D. Kellogg, died of disease at Lancaster, Pa., Feb. 3, 1862.

MEMBERS OF THE TWENTY-FIRST INFANTRY FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Company C.

Almon D. Bisbee, mustered out June 16, 1865.

Reuben Fisher, died of disease in New York Harbor.

Frederick Leonard, died of disease at Chattanooga, Tenn., Feb. 12, 1865.

Company E.

William H. French, mustered out May 26, 1865.

TWENTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY.

This regiment was recruited during the summer and early autumn of 1864, and finally completed its organization by the consolidation of several partially-formed companies intended for the Twenty-Ninth Infantry.

It left Kalamazoo, under the command of Lieutenant-Col. Delos Phillips, October 26th, and arrived in Louisville, Ky., on the 29th.

On the 10th of November it was ordered to Camp Nelson to guard a wagon-train from that point to Nashville, Tenn., where it arrived on the 5th of December.

The advance of Hood's rebel army on Nashville soon brought the regiment to face the realities of war, and, under the command of Col. William W. Wheeler, it participated in the defense of that city by Gen. Thomas, from the 12th to the 16th of December, 1864, fully establishing its reputation as a gallant command, and reaching the uniform high standard of Michigan troops.

After the battle of Nashville the regiment was attached to the Twenty-Third Army Corps, which was sent to the Atlantic seaboard to constitute a part of the force concentrating in the vicinity of Wilmington, N. C., to cooperate with Gen. Sherman's army on its approach to the coast.

The regiment was assigned to the Second Brigade, First Division (Ruger's), and arrived at Morehead City Feb. 24, 1865, and on the 2d of March marched with its division towards Kinston, joining Gen. Cox.

Meeting the enemy at Wise's Forks, the Twenty-Eighth, commanded by Col. Wheeler, took an active part in the battles of the 8th, 9th, and 10th of March at that point.

On the 8th the regiment was engaged in heavy skirmishing during the entire day and night.

On the succeeding day the enemy pressed Cox's lines strongly without making an assault, and at the same time attempted to turn his right, but failed on account of a prompt reinforcement, of which the Twenty-Eighth formed a part.

On the morning of the 10th the rebels made a fierce and determined charge upon the left, breaking the lines, but were finally repulsed.

The Second Brigade charged the rebels on the double-quick, driving them back, and taking over three hundred prisoners, among whom were several field-officers.

About two P.M. the enemy made a heavy and desperate onset on the left and centre of Gen. Cox's lines, but again most signally failed by reason of reinforcements coming up so promptly from the right.

The Second Brigade, among the first to arrive, fought most gallantly for about two hours, when the enemy retired from the field, leaving his dead and wounded and a large number of prisoners.

In this spirited engagement the regiment lost seven men killed and thirteen wounded.

Continuing the march, the regiment reached Kinston on the 14th, and Goldsboro' on the 21st.

It was then placed on guard duty along the line of the Atlanta and North Carolina Railroad.

On the 9th of April it marched again to Goldsboro', and on the 13th arrived in Raleigh.

After the cessation of hostilities it was on duty at Goldsboro', Raleigh, Charlotte, Lincolnton, Wilmington, and Newbern, N. C., until June 5, 1866, when it was mustered out of service.

MEMBERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Field and Staff.

Adj. Hiram R. Ellis, Saugatuck; com. Sept. 10, 1861; mustered out June 5, 1866.

Non-commissioned Staff.

Sergeant-Major John M. G. Mavers, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 20, 1864; mustered out June 5, 1866.

Company D.

E. A. Lindley, died by suicide, March 6, 1865.

Henry C. Meeker, died of disease at Alexandria, Feb. 11, 1865.

Company E.

Captain Samuel S. Thomas, Allegan; com. Aug. 15, 1864; res. May 15, 1865. Sergeant

Jeremiah Walter, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 25, 1864; discharged Nov. 1, 1865.

Corp. Wm. A. Lisco, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 31, 1864; mustered out June 5, 1866.

Corp. George Cady, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 23, 1864; discharged by order, June 18, 1865.

George W. Cummings, mustered out June 5, 1866.

William Eggleston, discharged for wounds, Aug. 17, 1865.

William French, discharged for wounds, June 16, 1865.

FIRST ENGINEERS AND MECHANICS.

John Hamilton, discharged by order, Sept. 3, 1865.

Jacob Killam, mustered out Nov. 17, 1865.

Lyman Lamoreaux, mustered out June 5, 1866.

John Moore, mustered out June 5, 1866.

Ashley R. Nichols, mustered out June 5, 1866.

Alva L. Pierce, mustered out June 5, 1866.

Herman H. Palmer, mustered out June 5, 1866.

Frederick Porter, nust. out June 5, 1866.

James B. Paul, mustered out June 5, 1866.

Peter Sergeant, discharged for disability, April 26, 1865.

Aaron Van Patten, mustered out June 5, 1866.

Allen N. Wait, mustered out June 5, 1866.

Ira Woodstock, died of disease at Alexandria, February, 1865.

Company H.

James G. Lindsley, died of disease at Louisville, Ky., Feb. 19, 1865.

Company I

Sergeant Charles W. Hoskins, Hopkins; enlisted Sept. 12, 1864; discharged by order, April 7, 1865.

Corp. Lewis H. Fountain, Hopkins; enlisted Sept. 10, 1864; mustered out June 5, 1866.

Henry Bryant, mustered out Oct. 24, 1865.

Company K.

1st Lieutenant Jeremiah B. Haney, Leighton; com. Oct. 18, 1864; res. Nov. 8, 1865.

2d Lieutenant William Duryea, Lee; com. Oct. 18, 1864; res. July 6, 1865.

MEMBERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company B.

Sergeant Isaac J. Brooks, Maple Grove; enlisted Sept. 2, 1864; mustered out June 5, 1863.

Corp. Charles J. Hanley, Maple Grove; enlisted Sept. 10, 1864; died of disease at Nashville, Jan. 8, 1865.

Emanuel Briggs, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 14, 1865.

Levi Briggs, died of disease at Camp Nelson, Ky., Nov. 12, 1864.

Charles Edwards, discharged for disability, Sept. 13, 1865.

Isaac Green, mustered out April 4, 1865.

William S. Hyde, discharged at end of service, Feb. 21, 1866.

S. T. Lazarus, mustered out June 5, 1866.

C. R. Palmer, discharged at end of service, Feb. 21, 1866.

Ephraim Trimm, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 13, 1865.

John E. Wilcox, discharged at end of service, Feb. 21, 1866.

Company C.

Theodore Steinkram, mustered out June 5, 1866.

George W. Howell, mustered out June 5, 1866.

F. Havens, discharged at end of service, April 12, 1866.

Company D.

Dallas Downs, mustered out June 5, 1866.

Company E.

John Sell, mustered out June 5, 1866.

Company K.

David Pott, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., July 10, 1865.

THIRTIETH INFANTRY.

On account of the numerous attempts made by the enemy in Canada to organize plundering raids against our northern border, authority was given by the War Department to the Governor of Michigan, in the autumn of 1864, to raise a regiment of infantry for one year's service, especially designed to guard the Michigan frontier.

Its formation, under the name of the Thirtieth Michigan Infantry, was begun at Jackson in November, 1864, and was completed at Detroit on the 9th of January, 1865.

To this regiment Allegan and Barry Counties furnished between sixty and seventy men, who were scattered among various companies.

When the organization was completed, the companies were detached and stationed at different points along the Detroit and St. Clair Rivers,-at Fort Gratiot, St. Clair, Wyandotte, Jackson, Fenton, Detroit, and Detroit Barracks.

But the speedy collapse of the Rebellion put an end to Canadian raids, and the regiment, although the men were ready for service, had no active duty to perform.

It remained on duty until the 30th of June, 1865, and was then mustered out.

MEMBERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Non-commissioned Staff.

Principal Musician Chas. Barton, Gun Plain; enlisted Dec. 21, 1864; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Company A.

Corp. Oliver Westfall, Otsego; enlisted Nov. 30, 1864; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Corp. Henry H. Saunders, Otsego; enlisted Nov. 30, 1864; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Corp. Addison Childs, Otsego; enlisted Dec. 5, 1864; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Thos. Baxter, Wm. F. Cole, Clas. Davey, Thos. Jackson,

Samuel G. Mills, Win. G. Stearns, Michael Shaughnessy,

Harvey Sutton, John Shea, Ebenezer Warren, Chas. W. Wood, Wm. E. Yale,

Merrick Zautz, mustered out June 30, 1865.

Company B.

Arnson A. Culver, Daniel Wasker, Doctor M. Wasker, mustered out June 30, 1865.

Company C.

Mathew J. Allegan, Chas. K. Bowlin, Melvin Eastwood, Harvey McDonald, Jesse Van Camp, Sr., Jesse Van Camp, Jr., L. Van Camp, mustered out June 30, 1865.

Company E.

Wm. Curry,

Birney Hathaway, mustered out June 30, 1865.

Company F.

Wm. J. Durand, Wm. W. Freese, John McEwen, Edward Norman, mustered out June 30, 1865.

Company G.

Leander Fuller, Milford Roosa, mustered out June 30, 1865.

Company H.

Sergeant Saml. P. Spaulding, Gun Plain; enlisted Dec. 19, 1864; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Sergeant James R. Londray, Gun Plain; enlisted Nov. 26, 1864; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Corp. E. M. T.Silliman, Gun Plain; enlisted Dec. 19, 1861; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Corp. Jacob Hildebrand, Martin; enlisted Dec. 28, 1864; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Wm. A. Bratt, Frederick Bless, Franklin Burlingame, Thos. Carroll, Ralph B. Clark, Nelson Degraff, Marshall H. Ensign, Frederick Green, Gregory Navarre, Sylvester D. Randall, Sylvanus H. Randall, Orlando Ryan, Chas. Williams, Patrick Walch, all mustered out June 30, 1865.

Company K.

Sergeant James Shippie, Overisel; enlisted Dec. 24, 1864; mustered out June 30, 1865. Wm. P. Hunter, Chas. Maxon, Andrew J. Parsons, mustered out June 30, 1865.

MEMBERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company F.

William P. Fifield, Theodore A. Healey, Silas N. Miller, John H. Rook, Asa D. Rook, mustered out June 30, 1865.

Company I.

1st Lieutenant Geo. M. Brooks, Orangeville; com. Jan. 9, 1865; mustered out June 30, 1865.

FIRST ENGINEERS AND MECHANICS.

Organization of the Regiment-Departure for the Front-Service by Detachments-Building Bridges, etc.-Difficulties regarding Pay -Fight at Lavergne-The Regiment defeats Wheeler's and Wharton's Brigades-Service in the Summer of 1863-Placed on a Footing with Regular Engineers-Building Bridges in the Winter -Erecting Block-Houses-Importance of the Engineers' Services -Close of Original Term-The March through Georgia-Through the Carolinas-A Detachment left in Tennessee-It rejoins the Regiment-Closing Services-Allegan County Members-Barry County Members.

THIS regiment, every company of which contained men from Allegan and Barry Counties, was organized under the.law of Aug. 3, 1861, authorizing the President to receive into service five hundred thousand volunteers.

Its original members rendezvoused at Marshall during the months of August and September, 1861, remaining there in camp of instruction, busily preparing for their duties in the field, until the 17th of December, 1861.

It was then, with an aggregate force of one thousand and thirty-two men and officers, commanded by Col. William P. Innes, transferred by rail to Louisville, Ky., joining there the army commanded by Major-Gen. Buell.

From this time it began a series of varied services, principally by detachments.

One of these detachments, then under Gen. O. M. Mitchell, was the first Union force to enter Bowling Green, Ky., after its evacuation by the enemy, and another was at the battle of Chaplain Hills.

During the spring and summer of 1862 the regiment was mostly employed in the repair or reopening of the railroads between Nashville and Chattanooga, Nashville and Columbia, Corinth and Decatur, Huntsville and Stevenson, and Memphis and Corinth, and twice assisted in reopening the road between Louisville and Nashville.

In the month of June, 1862, alone, it built seven bridges on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, each from eighty-four to three hundred and forty feet in length-in the aggregate nearly three thousand feet-and from twelve to sixty feet in height.

After the battle of Pittsburg Landing it was engaged at that point eight weeks in the construction of steamboat-landings, etc., with only one day's rest.

Serious difficulties existed in the regiment during the first months of its service, owing to a misunderstanding as to the pay the men were to receive, it having been found after their organization that there was no law by which they could receive the pay expected.

This trouble was finally remedied by an act of Congress, which act also proposed to increase the regiment's strength from ten to twelve companies of one hundred and fifty men each, forming three battalions, each commanded by a major.

Half the men, as artificers, drew seventeen dollars per month, and the others thirteen dollars per month.

On the 1st of November, 1862, the regiment was encamped at Edgefield, Tenn., when the alterations and casualties to that date aggregated as follows:

Died of disease, seventy-five;

died of wounds received in action, two;

killed in action, one;

wounded in action, seventeen;

discharged, one hundred and twenty-four;

taken prisoners, fifteen;

deserted, twenty;

recruits received, sixty-seven.

Until June 29, 1863, the regiment was stationed at Edgefield and Mill Creek, near Nashville, at Lavergne, Murfreesboro, and Smyrna, and at a point near Nashville on the Tennessee and Alabama Railroad.

During this time the regiment built nine bridges, besides a number of magazines and buildings for commissary, quartermaster, and ordnance stores, and also repaired and re-laid a large amount of railroad track.

At Lavergne, Tenn., on the 1st of January, 1863, it was attacked by the rebel Gens. Wheeler and Wharton, who, with a force of over three thousand Cavalry and two pieces of artillery, were compelled to retire with loss, the loss of the regiment in this action being but one man killed and six wounded.

On the 29th of June, 1863, the regiment moved south from Murfreesboro and during the two succeeding months was engaged repairing and opening the railroad from Murfreesboro, Tenn., to Bridgeport, Ala.

Of five bridges completed in July, the one over Elk River was four hundred and sixty feet in length; that over Duck River, three hundred and fifty feet long.

During September and October detached companies were employed in building an immense bridge over the Tennessee River at Bridgeport, Ala., constructing commissary buildings at Stevenson, Ala., and building and repairing bridges, etc., on the lines of the Nashville and Chattanooga and the Nashville and Northwestern Railroads; the headquarters of the regiment being at Elk River Bridge, Tenn.

By an act of Congress passed in 1862, regiments and independent companies which had been " mustered into the service of the United States as volunteer engineers, pioneers, or sappers and miners" were " recognized and accepted as volunteer engineers, on the same footing, in all respects, in regard to their organization, pay, and emoluments, as the corps of engineers of the regular army of the United States."

The standard of organization thus established allowed the regiment twelve companies of one hundred and fifty enlisted men each, viz., two musicians, ten sergeants, ten corporals, sixty-four artificers, and sixty-four privates.

The alterations and casualties for the year, to Nov. 1, 1863, were:

Died in action or of wounds, six;

died of disease, fifty-eight;

discharged for disability, one hundred and eighty-nine;

discharged for other causes, fourteen;

deserted, twenty-seven;

officers resigned, ten;

joined as recruits, three hundred and seventy-two;

aggregate strength, nine hundred and sixty-five.

In the months of November and December, 1863, and January and February, 1864, the regiment was engaged in building trestle-work and bridges on the line of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad, and in the construction of store houses and other buildings at Chattanooga, Tenn., and Bridgeport, Ala., for the quartermaster, ordnance, and other departments of the army.

At the same time one battalion was engaged at Chattanooga in refitting saw-mills, where it continued during the months of March, April, and May, employed in running saw-mills, getting out railroad-ties, building hospital accommodations, and working on the defenses.

Detachments from the other battalions were engaged erecting block-houses on the lines of the Tennessee and Alabama, the Nashville and Chattanooga, and the Memphis and Charleston Railroads.

Two companies were at Bridgeport, Ala., building artillery block-houses.

Two companies were at Stevenson, Ala., completing its defenses, while another battalion was stationed on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, building block-houses at various points between Decatur and Stevenson.

The major portion of the regiment was finally concentrated upon the line of the Atlantic and Western Railroad during the summer months of 1864, where it built and repaired railroads, block-houses, etc.

The task allotted to this regiment during the fierce campaign of Sherman's army, in 1864, was one of great magnitude, and most nobly did its members fulfill their duty.

But for such men as composed the Michigan Engineers and Mechanics, and the rapidity with which they repaired the railroad right up to the enemy's skirmish-line, the more than one hundred thousand Union soldiers in front would many times have gone to sleep without their usual rations of "hard tack, sow belly, and coffee."

As Johnston's army fell back from one chosen position to another before the fierce attacks and flank movements of Sherman's veterans, the railroad was invariably destroyed by the enemy, and in a manner, too, that would seem to require days to repair it.

Imagine, then, the surprise and chagrin of the "Johnnies," when, in the course of a very few hours, a locomotive bearing the legend "United States”,

At the close of the Atlanta campaign, headquarters of the regiment were established in the latter city.

The alterations and casualties for the year were reported as follows:

Died of disease, one hundred and twelve; transferred thirty-six; discharged for disability, etc., fifty; re-enlisted as veterans, one hundred and forty-eight.

On the 31st of October, 1864, the original term of the regiment expired, and such officers as desired to leave the service were mustered out, as were also the enlisted men whose terms had expired.

The re-enlisted veterans, together with the recruits who had joined the regiment, enabled it to maintain its organization entire and nearly its full strength.

From the 1st to the 15th of November, 1864, the regiment, with the exception of Companies L and M, was stationed at Atlanta, Ga., being employed in constructing defenses, destroying rebel works, depots, rolling-mills, foundries, gas-works, and other rebel property, and in tearing up and rendering useless the various railroad-tracks in the vicinity.

After the complete destruction of Atlanta, the regiment set out on the morning of November 16, with the Fourteenth Army Corps, as part of the engineer force of Gen. Sherman's army; going to Sandersville, Ga., and thence with the Twentieth Army Corps, to Horse Creek, where it received orders to join the Seventeenth Army Corps, with which it continued on to Savannah, Ga., reaching there Dec. 10, 1864.

During this march the regiment was required to keep pace with the movements of the army, traveling over twenty miles a day, and meanwhile was engaged tearing up railroad-tracks, twisting rails, destroying bridges, repairing and making roads, building and repairing wagon-bridges, etc.

On the 10th and 11th of December the regiment built a dam across the Ogechee Canal under the fire of rebel batteries.

From that time until after the evacuation of Savannah by the enemy, the regiment was constantly at work tearing up railroad-track and destroying the rails of the several railroads leading out of the city, and in constructing long stretches of corduroy-road for the passage of army-trains.

On the 23d of December it moved into the city, and five days later commenced work on the fortifications laid out by direction of Gen. Sherman.

These works, constructed by and under the supervision of this regiment, were over two miles in length, and included several strong battery-positions and lunettes.

The regiment was again put in motion on the 3d of January, 1865; marching to Pooler Station, converting the railroad into a wagon-road, and then returning to Savannah.

It embarked on board transports for Beaufort, S. C., January 26, 1865, and on the 31st started with the victorious Military Railroad," driven by a greasy Northern mechanic, would dash up in their very midst, as it were, saluting them with several toots, and then a prolonged shrill whistle.

The salute, however, as well as the cheers from the "Yanks," usually, and very quickly, too, received a response in the shape of shells from a rebel battery.

Afternoon and night of Nov. 15, 1864. army on its march to Goldsboro', N. C.

It moved with the Fifteenth Army Corps to Banbury, S. C., thence with the Twentieth Army Corps to Columbia, S. C., thence with the Seventeenth Corps to Fayetteville, N. C., and thence with the Twentieth Army Corys to Goldsboro', N. C., where it arrived March 23, 1865.

It is estimated that during this campaign, besides making and repairing a great distance of corduroy-road, the regiment destroyed and twisted the rails of thirty miles of railroad-track and built eight or ten important bridges and crossings.

At Edisto the bridge was constructed under fire from the enemy's sharpshooters.

At Hughes Creek and at Little and Big Lynch Creeks the bridges and approaches were built at night.

At the last-named stream the men worked in water waist-deep.

A foot-crossing was made there in one night, nearly a mile in length, and the next day the space was corduroyed for the heavy army-trains and artillery to pass over.

The regiment destroyed factories and rebel army supplies at Columbia, rebel ordnance and stores at Cheraw, and the old United States arsenal at Fayetteville, N. C., etc.

Companies L and M, which had been detached from the regiment early in the summer of 1864 and placed upon the defenses at Stevenson, Ala., having completed those works, which consisted of a system of eight block-houses, were retained in the Army of the Cumberland.

They assisted to fortify and defend the line of the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad for some weeks, and on the 28th of November, 1864, were moved to Elk River Bridge.

For some time after that, when not interrupted by Hood's rebel army, they were engaged in building block-houses between that bridge and Murfreesboro, Tenn.

During the most of the month of December a portion of the Engineers and Mechanics was engaged in completing and repairing Fort Rosecrans, Murfreesboro, Tenn., while the rebels, under Hood, were investing Nashville.

A detachment, consisting of Company L of this regiment, with several companies of an Illinois regiment which had been sent out to bring through from Stevenson, Ala., a railroad-train of supplies, was captured Dec. 15, 1864, after several hours' hard fighting.

On the 1st of March, 1865, Companies L and M left Murfreesboro, Tenn., to rejoin their regiment, and proceeding by rail, via Louisville, Indianapolis, Crestline, Pittsburgh, and Philadelphia, to New York, they then took steamer to Beaufort, N. C., thence by rail to Newbern, and finally joined their comrades at Goldsboro', N. C., March 25, 1865. Gen. Sherman's army began its last campaign April 10, 1865.

By breaking camp at Goldsboro' and moving rapidly to the northward, Johnston's fleeing forces were pursued to, through, and beyond Raleigh.

The Engineers and Mechanics marched with the Twentieth Army Corps, but proceeded no farther than Raleigh, where they remained until after Johnston's' surrender on the 30th April the regiment moved out on its homeward march with the Seventeenth Army Corps.

It crossed the Roanoke River at Monroe, and, passing through the cities of Petersburg, Richmond, and Alexandria, Va., arrived at Washington, D. C.  April 26, 1865.

During the latter part of May, 1865, it participated in the grand review of two hundred thousand veteran soldiery held at the nation's capital, May 23 and 24, 1865, and then went into camp near Georgetown, D. C.

Early in June the regiment was ordered to Louisville, Ky., thence to Nashville, Tenn., where it was employed upon the defenses until September 22d, when it was mustered out of the United States service.

It arrived at the designated rendezvous, Jackson, Michigan, September 25th, and on the 1st day of. October, 1865, was paid off and disbanded.

The battles and skirmishes which by general orders it was entitled to have inscribed upon its colors were those of Mill Springs, Ky., Jan. 19, 1862; Farmington, Miss., May 9, 1862; siege of Corinth, Miss., May 10 to 31, 1862; Perryville, Ky., Oct. 8, 1862; Lavergne, Tenn., Jan. 1, 1863; Chattanooga, Tenn., Oct. 6, 1863; siege of Atlanta, Ga., July 22 to Sept. 2, 1864; Savannah, Ga., Dec. 11 to 23, 1864; Bentonville, N. C., March 19, 1865.

MEMBERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Company A.

Charles R. Averill, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Edward Averill, discharged by order, July 18, 1865.

Cvrus E. Babbitt, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Hiram Bisby, died of disease at Willets' Point, N. Y., May 14, 1865.

Theodore Crapey, discharged by order June 6, 1865.

William Degoit, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

David Frank, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Henry Frank, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Samuel Frank, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

0. L. Gleason, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Cyrus E. Goodspeed, discharged by order, July 21, 1865.

George H. Goodspeed, died of disease at Chattanooga, Tenn., Jan. 9, 1865.

Russell H. Jones, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Hugh Johnson, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Riley Miller, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Jefferson Reed, died of disease at Goldsboro', N. C., March 28, 1865.

William M. Shepherd, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

J. M. Sterling, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Mathias Van Tassell, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Company B.

Philip Bovee, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Walter Curtis, died of disease at Alexandria, Va., July 8, 1865.

Lyman M. Henderson, died of disease at Annapolis, Md., April 4, 1865.

Myron Heffron, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Elisha Poland, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

George R. Roach, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Myron Sullivan, disch by order, June 6, 1865.

Michael Strayer, discharged by order, May 22, 1865.

William E. Ticknor, died of disease in Indiana, May 17, 1864.

Company C.

Augustus P. Howe, discharged by order, May 30, 1865.

William H. Wallace, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company D.

Corp. George H. Fausler, died of disease in Kentucky, Feb. 7, 1863.

David F. Ayers, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Theodore M. Ayers, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Richard Boyle, died of disease at Savannah, Ga., Jan. 26, 1865.

Leaider Brewer, discharged for disability, Dec. 11, 1865.

Andrew E. Bates, veteran, enlisted Jan. 3, 1864; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Joseph Douglass, discharged for disability, Jan. 18, 1863.

William Everhardt, died of disease at Nashville, March 28, 1863.

Moses H. Fausler, died of disease at Nashville, May 3, 1862.

Samuel Hunter, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

John C. Hirspool, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Leonard T. Kinner, died of disease, March 11, 1862.

Henry Leslie, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Hezekiah Mason, disch by order, June 6, 1865.

Lyman Mathews, discharged by order, May 29, 1865.

Leroy Root, discharged for disability, July 8, 1862.

Andrew J. Ross, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

John Parsons, discharged for disability, March 9, 1863.

Edgar A. Thompson, veteran, enlisted Jan. 3, 1864; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William Witherell, discharged for disability, June 20, 1865.

Company E.

1st Lieutenant John W. Spoor, Allegan; com. Nov. 3, 1864; 2d Lieutenant, Jan. 1, 1864; Sergeant; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Corp. Philip J. Coon, Wayland; enlisted Sept. 11, 1861; discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Amasa B. Carpenter, died of disease, Feb. 25, 1863.

Marshall Darrow, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Francis M. Filkins, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

James Goodspeed, died of disease at Alexandria, May 8, 1865.

Cyrus E. Hollister, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Lucius F. Hill, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Minot Hoyt, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Isaac N. Hoyt, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Charles W. King, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Curtis Murray, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Chester D. Walchl, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Company F.

Ambrose Mudge, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Jacob W. Ridgely, died of disease in Tennessee, March 11, 1865.

Company G.

Gilbert Eagle, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Henry H. Jennings, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Albert H. Lillie, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

William Osman, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Frank F. Russell, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Henry Starring, discharged for disability, June 23, 1862.

Charles Stratton, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Company H.

2d Lieutenant Osmer Eaton, Otsego; cornm. Jan. 1, 1864; discharged at end of service, Oct. 26, 1864.

Albert Brundage, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

David Fargo, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Perly Mann, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

George Robbins, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Parker Truax, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Aaron Wing, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Company L

Ephraim Prindle, discharged by order, June 27, 1865.

James B. Yeamans, discharged by order, June 29, 1865.

Company K.

Clement C. Bement, died of disease at Chattanooga, March 10, 1864.

John Dean, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Ira S. Harriman, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

John B. King, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Francis P. Williams, discharged for disability, June 18, 1862.

Robert Williams, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Company L.

Sergeant Cornelius Engles, Otsego; enlisted Jan. 1, 1863; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Augustus Dean, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

William Heydenberg, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Sanford Scott, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Company M.

John W. Leoply, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William F, Leoply, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

BARRY COUNTY MEMBERS.

Company A.

William Scott, discharged by order, July 21, 1865.

Company B.

Charles Dowse, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., June 24, 1862.

William C. Goodyear, discharged for disability, Dec. 19, 1863.

Company C.

Sergeant Zophar Sidmore, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 14, 1861; discharged for disability, April 17, 1863.

Sergeant Andrew J. Beers, Irving; enlisted Sept. 12, 1861; veteran, Jan. 1, 1864; promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Co. L.

Corp. Joseph L. Hewett, Irving; enlisted Sept. 17, 1861; discharged by order, July 14, 1863.

Musician Jonathan R. Russell, Thornapple; enlisted Oct. 9, 1861; discharged for disability, Sept. 2, 1862.

George H. Brownson, discharged for disability, Oct. 8, 1863.

Nathaniel Birdsall, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

William H. Bayless, discharged by order, May 29, 1865.

Eliphalet R. Cartwright, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

James Curtis, discharged for disability, Sept. 9, 1862.

Benona A. Cotant, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Dec. 15, 1863.

James Clark, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

James W. Cutler, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Oliver Cheeney, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William Clark, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

George H. Darmat, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Frederick A. Fuller, discharged at Nashville, Tenn.

James M. Flanigan. veteran, enlisted Jan. 1, 1864; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Alson Gray, discharged for disability, April 24, 1862.

Oliyer P. Hewitt, discharged for disability, March 7, 1862.

William Hazen, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Abner Hall, died of disease-at Nashville, Tenn., March 29, 1864.

Solomon Hardenburgh, died of disease at Chattanooga, Tenn., March 15, 1864.

T homas Haney, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865. H

iram Jones, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Horatio Morgridge, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

John MeOmber, died of disease at Chattanooga, Tenn., March 15, 1864.

Orson Myers, died of disease at Chattanooga, Tenn., March 17, 1864.

Daniel S. Mead, died of disease at Hastings, Michigan, Feb. 5, 1864.

Liberty Marble, discharged for disability, March 3, 1863.

William Morgan, discharged for disability, Nov. 28, 1863.

John H. McLellan, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Theodore R. Mattison, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Francis Nye, veteran, enlisted Jan. 1, 1864; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

George W. Osborn, discharged for disability, July 25, 1862.

William Roberts, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Walter Robinson, discharged by order, June 27, 1865.

Mathias Reiser, died of wounds at Cincinnati, Ohio, Jan. 25, 1863.

David H. Sanford, discharged for disability, April 30, 1862.

Samuel Sweet, discharged for disability, Oct. 6, 1862.

Norman Seaver, discharged for disability, Dec. 4, 1862.

Ezra Sweet, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Charles W. Sheldon, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Edwin B. Sidmore, veteran, enlisted Jan. 2, 1864; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Abel Shepard, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Charles 11. Stone, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Washington Topping, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Jefferson Turner, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Alonzo Van Horn, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

William D. Vaughan, discharged for disability, July 28, 1862.

William Vester, discharged for disability, Jan. 25, 1863.

John Vredenburgh, discharged for disability, Oct. 29, 1862.

Watson E. Woodruff, discharged for disability, June 3, 1863.

Amos W. Warner, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

James C. Woodruff, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

John Weisert, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Oscar H. Young, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Company D.

James H. Gault, died of disease at Ypsilanti, Michigan, May 25, 1862.

Matthew A. Patrick, discharged for disability, Aug. 8, 1865.

Roswell Webster, discharged for disability, Jan. 31, 1863.

Company F.

Samuel Gibbs, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Robert Holliday, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William H. Johnson, discharged by order, Aug. 4, 1865.

Albert B. Sayles, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company G.

Edwin M. Bowman, died of disease at Town Creek, Ga., Nov. 24, 1864.

Lewis C. Bugby, died of disease at Savannah, Ga., Feb. 16, 1865.

Andrew E. Breese, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Stephen E. Crandall, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Henry Haugh, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Wilson F. Hart, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Southern Monroe, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Levi Palmatier, discharged by order, June 6, 1865.

Company H.

Stephen Downs, discharged at end of service, Oct. 31, 1864.

Lewis Ives, discharged for disability, April 26, 1862.

Company K.

John Jacobs, veteran, enlisted Dec. 31, 1863; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William H. H. Miller, discharged for disability, Feb. 18, 1863.

John Vandermere, died of disease at New York Harbor, May 4, 1865.

Company L.

Andrew J. Beers, 1st Lieutenant, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD CAVALRY.

The First Cavalry goes to Virginia in October, 1861-Winters in Maryland-Its Battles in 1862-Assigned to the "Michigan Brigade"-Defeats Hampton's Legion-The New Battalion-Loss in the Wilderness-At Trevillian-At Front Royal, Winchester, and Cedar Creek-In at the Death of the Rebellion-Ordered to the Rocky Mountains-Disbanded in March, 1866-Allegan County Soldiers-Barry County Soldiers-The Second Cavalry goes to St. Louis-Operates on the Mississippi-Services around Corinth Philip H. Sheridan its Colonel-Ordered to Kentucky-A March to East Tennessee-Then to Middle Tennessee-A Fight with Forrest -More Fighting in Middle and East Tennessee-Re-enlistment Resisting Hood's Advance in the Fall of 1864-Closing Services Officers and Soldiers from Barry County-From Allegan County Allegan County's Representation in the Third Cavalry-Operations on the Mississippi and around Corinth-A Gallant Achievement Battle of Iuka-Fights in the Winter of 1862-63-Fighting Guerrillas in 1863-Description of that Kind of Warfare-Re-enlistment -Subsequent Services-Ordered to Texas-Mustered out-Officers and Men from Allegan County-Soldiers from Barry County.

FIRST CAVALRY.

The First Regiment of Michigan Cavalry was organized during the summer of 1861, and left its rendezvous at Detroit for the seat of war in Virginia, under the command of Col. T. F. Brodhead, on the 29th of September of the same year.

Among its original members were several from Allegan County, and before the close of the war some fifty men had joined its ranks from the counties of Barry and Allegan.

The regiment passed the winter of 1861-62 in camp near Frederick, Md., and in the following spring entered upon active service on the Upper Potomac, in the Shenandoah Valley, and near the eastern slopes of the Blue Ridge.

It was in battle at Winchester, Va., March 23, 1862; at Middletown, Va., March 15th; at Strasburg, March 27th; at Harrisonburg, April 22d; at Winchester again, May 24th; at Orange Court-House, July 16th; at Cedar Mountain, August 9th; and at Bull Run, Aug. 30, 1862.

In the last-named battle Col. Brodhead was mortally wounded, and the regiment lost twenty men killed and wounded, seven prisoners, and one hundred and six missing.

To Nov. 1, 1862, ten others had died of wounds received in action, and sixty of disease.

After passing another winter near Frederick, Md., the regiment again entered the field, and during the early part of 1863 performed picket duty along the line of Union defenses extending from Edward's Ferry to the mouth of the Occoquan.

On the 27th June it moved northward in the Gettysburg campaign, and for fifteen days it was almost constantly engaged in conflicts with the enemy.

The First formed part of the celebrated “Michigan Cavalry Brigade," of which Gen. Custer was so long the commander, and which contributed very largely to the renown of that distinguished Cavalry leader.

At Gettysburg, on the 3d of July, 1863, the First met and charged Hampton's Legion, consisting of three regiments of rebel Cavalry, and defeated it in six minutes, having eleven officers and eighty men killed and wounded out of three hundred who went into the action.

In September, 1863, the War Department authorized the consolidation of the twelve companies into eight and the raising of a new battalion of four companies.

These were speedily raised, and the new battalion was mustered into service at Mount Clemens, in December, 1863.

This battalion went to Camp Stoneman, near Washington, in December, 1863, and remained there until the spring of 1864.

Meanwhile, the two old battalions re-enlisted, came home on veteran furlough, and joined the new levies at Camp Stoneman.

The three battalions went to the front together, and in the latter part of March, 1864, joined Gen. Sheridan's Cavalry corps at Culpeper, Va., being still a part of the “Michigan Cavalry Brigade."

The regiment had ten men killed and twenty wounded in the battle of the Wilderness.

It was engaged at Hanovertown, on the 27th of May, and at Hawes' Shop on the 28th, where fifteen of its members were killed and wounded, and at Old Church on the 30th, where fifteen were killed and wounded.

On the 31st of May and 1st of June it was engaged, together with other Cavalry regiments, at Cold Harbor, where it fought, dismounted, in advance of the infantry; having eighteen men killed and wounded.

It shared the fortunes of the brigade throughout the summer; having fifty-one men killed and wounded at Trevillian Station (where six commissioned officers were killed), eleven killed and wounded at Front Royal in the Shenandoah Valley, thirty-two at Manchester, and twenty-seven at Cedar Creek.

During the six months closing on the 1st of November, 1864, the regiment had eighty-two men killed or mortally wounded in action, and one hundred and two less seriously wounded, while only thirty-three died of disease.

After being in quarters with the brigade near Winchester through the winter, the First went with it in Sheridan's great raid in March, 1865, and was warmly engaged in the closing scenes of the Rebellion.

After this the regiment moved into the edge of North Carolina, then returned to Washington, and immediately after the review of the Army of the Potomac, on the 23d of May, 1865, was sent by rail and steamer to Fort Leavenworth, Kan., whence it was ordered across the Plains.

There was much dissatisfaction, but most of the regiment set out on the march; reaching Camp Collins, at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, on the 26th of July.

Its headquarters remained there until about the 1st of November, when it was moved to Fort Bridger.

There it was consolidated with those men of the Sixth and Seventh Michigan Cavalry who had the longest time to serve; forming an organization known as the First Michigan Veteran Cavalry.

Company K was distributed among several other companies.

After the consolidation eight companies were sent to Camp Douglas, near Salt Lake City, while four remained at Fort Bridger.

The regiment garrisoned those two stations until the 10th of March, 1866, when it was mustered out, paid off, and disbanded.

The men were given their choice,-to be disbanded in Utah then, or to remain till June and then be marched to Fort Leavenworth, without horses or tents.

All but about seventy made the former choice.

The commutation paid them in lieu of transportation, however, was not enough to carry them home, and, on representation of the injustice to Congress, that body voted three hundred and twenty-five dollars to each member of the regiment, minus the amount already paid as commutation money.

This gave each member about two hundred and ten dollars extra, which was duly paid them by the government.

ALLEGAN COUNTY SOLDIERS.

Company A.

John Rutan, (lied of disease at Alexandria, Va., June 10, 1862.

Company B.

Robert W. Martin, mustered out May 14, 1866.

Amos Ruland, mustered out Dec. 5, 1865.

Company C.

Miles Wright, mustered out Dec. 5, 1865.

Company E.

George Brown, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Aretus E. Black, mustered out March 10, 1866.

James H. Birkhead, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Henry L. Monteith, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Florence Sullivan, mustered out Dec. 5. 1865.

Company F.

Hiram O. Miller, mustered out March 25, 1866.

Company G.

Darius J. Cushman, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Darwin E. White, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Company H.

Thomas Hoagland, mustered out.

Origen Hamilton, mustered out.

Company I.

2d Lieutenant Orrin M. Bartlett, Gun Plain; cor. March 7, 1865; killed in action at Five Forks, Va., April 1, 1865.

1st Sergeant Nahum Gilbert, Otsego; enlisted Aug. 21, 1861; discharged for disability, July 14, 1863.

Corp. Charles W. Belcher, Otsego; enlisted Aug. 21, 1861; missing in action at Brandy Station, Oct. 11, 1863.

Corp. Otis A. Cackler, Otsego; enlisted Aug. 21, 1861; discharged for disability, Jan. 7, 1862.

MusicianThomas Jeffs, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 21, 1861; veteran, Dec. 21, 1863; transferred to Co. L; discharged by order, July 1, 1865.

Saddler William J. Monteith, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 21, 1861; veteran, Dec. 21, 1863; transferred to Co. L; discharged by order, July 1, 1865.

Company K.

Franklin J. Church, mustered out.

Company L.

Jefferson Brown, mustered out Dec. 5, 1865.

William Brown, mustered out by order, June 7, 1865.

Horace Dunning, discharged by order, Sept. 12, 1864.

Isaac Furgeson, mustered out Dec. 5, 1865.

Nelson Russ, mustered out Nov. 14, 1865.

Friend Reed, mustered out Dec. 5, 1865.

Thomas Schlayer, discharged by order, June 26, 1865.

David C. Smith, discharged at end of service, Aug. 22, 1865.

Company M.

Barzillai Houston, mustered out June 30, 1866.

Johnson Mellott, mustered out July 24, 1865.

MEMBERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company D.

Andrew L. Barnum, died in action at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864.

Company E.

William D. Mathews, must out March 2, 1865.

Rollin C. Norton, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Company F.

Grant H. Van Voorhies, mustered out June 30, 1866.

Company G.

William M. Davis, mustered out Dec. 5, 1865.

Company K.

Alfred Train, mustered out March 25, 1866.

Company L.

Clinton J. Williamson, died of disease at Fort Kearney, July 23, 1865.

FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD CAVALRY.

SECOND CAVALRY.

Allegan and Barry Counties were both represented by good men in the Second Cavalry.

The companies comprising this fine regiment rendezvoused at Grand Rapids early in the fall of 1861.

On the 28th of November, 1861, the Second proceeded to St. Louis, Mo., where it was encamped at Benton Barracks until early in the spring of 1862, when it joined the forces organizing under Gen. John Pope to operate against New Madrid and Island No. 10.

After the capture of those rebel strongholds the regiment proceeded with Pope's " Army of the Mississippi," via the Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee Rivers, to Hamburg Landing, Tenn.

It was engaged in the battle of Farmington, Miss, May 5, 1862, and in the subsequent siege of Corinth during the remainder of that month.

It pressed closely upon Beauregard's retreating columns when they fled south from Corinth, and fought them at Boonville, Blackland, and Baldwin, Miss.

Thereafter, throughout the summer of 1862, the regiment was actively employed on various duties in Northern Mississippi and Western Tennessee.

Its colonel was then Philip H. Sheridan, now lieutenant-general, who had recently been detailed fiom duty as a captain in the regular army to receive the colonelcy lately vacated by the promotion of Gen. Gordon Granger.

Col. Sheridan commanded a brigade, consisting of the Second Michigan, Second Iowa, and Seventh Kansas Cavalry, and at its head made numerous excursions through the country around Corinth, to keep down guerrillas and learn the movements of the enemy.

Early in the autumn, however, Col. Sheridan was made a brigadier-general of volunteers and transferred to the Army of the Cumberland, and about the same time the Second Cavalry was sent to Kentucky.

In December, 1862, and January, 1863, it was engaged in a movement into East Tennessee, the men being in the saddle twenty-two days and taking part in several sharp skirmishes.

Soon afterward it moved into Middle Tennessee, and for several months its headquarters were at or near Murfreesboro, while it was almost constantly engaged in scouts and raids through that region.

On the 25th of March, 1863, it had a sharp encounter with a large rebel force under Gen. N. B. Forrest, killing and wounding many and capturing fifty-two prisoners.

The Second had seven men killed and wounded.

On the 4th of June it had another brisk skirmish between Franklin and Triune, Tenn., five of its men being killed and wounded.

When the army advanced from Murfreesboro in June, 1863, the Second accompanied it in the Cavalry division, driving the enemy from Shelbyville, Middletown, and other points.

In the autumn it was engaged in scouting around Chattanooga, at one time being part of a force which chased Gen. Wheeler's Cavalry one hundred and ninety-one miles in six days (October 3d to 8th, inclusive).

In November it marched into East Tennessee, and on the 24th of December it participated in an attack on a large force of the enemy at Dandridge, Tenn., having ten men killed and wounded.

On the 26th of January, 1864, the Second with other forces attacked a brigade of rebel Cavalry on Pigeon River, capturing three pieces of artillery and seventy-five prisoners, and having eleven of its own men wounded.

Three hundred and twenty-eight of the men re-enlisted as veterans, and in April went home on veteran furlough.

The rest of the regiment accompanied Gen. Sherman in his Atlanta campaign, having several sharp skirmishes with the enemy, but being ordered back from Lost Mountain to Franklin, Tenn., where it was rejoined by the veterans in July.

During the summer and autumn the Second was busily engaged in marching through Middle Tennessee, fighting with the horsemen of Forrest and other rebel generals.

On the 5th of November, 1864, the regiment was attacked at Shoal Creek, Ala., by a large Confederate force (a part of Hood's army, then advancing against Nashville), and was forced back with heavy loss.

It steadily fell back, skirmishing almost constantly with the enemy, and at Franklin, on the 30th of November, it resisted his advance all day, having eighteen officers and men killed and wounded.

After Hood's defeat before Nashville, the Second pressed hard on his rear, and at Richland Creek, on the 24th of December, charged repeatedly, driving the foe sixteen miles, and having seven men killed and wounded.

After Hood's final retreat from the State the regiment remained mostly in Middle Tennessee until March 11, 1865, when it set out on a long raid through Northern Alabama to Tuscaloosa, and thence through Talladega to Macon, Ga., where it arrived on the 1st day of May, 1865.

After remaining in Georgia on garrison duty until the 17th of August, the regiment was mustered out and sent home, arriving at Jackson on the 25th of August, 1865, where it was paid off and disbanded.

OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Field and Staff.

Lieutenant-Col. Marshall J. Dickenson, Vermontville; c, m. July 31, 1865, but not mustered; Major Sept. 13, 1863; Captain Co. B, May 17, 1862; 2d Lieutenant Sept. 2, 1861; mustered out as major, Aug. 17, 1865.

Company B.

Captain Marshall J. Dickenson. (See Field and Staff.)

Captain Isaac Griswold, Vermontville; com. Jan. 31, 1865, but not mustered; 1st Lieutenant Oct. 1, 1864; mustered out as 1st Lieutenant Aug. 17, 1865.

Company C.

Captain Martin L. Squier, Vermontville*; com. Oct. 22, 1864; 1st Lieutenant March 1, 1864; 2d Lieutenant April 15, 1863; sergeant; mustered out Aug. 17, 1865.

Musician Augustus Atkins, died of disease in Iowa, July 26, 1862.

James W. Hotchkiss, discharged for disability, Sept. 11, 1862.

James R. Shadden, mustered out July 26, 1865.

Herman E. Wood, discharged for disability, May 2, 1862.

Company F.

Philip Arthur, mustered out June 21, 1865.

Lorenzo Livingston, mustered out Aug. 17, 1865.

Charles I. McMurray, discharged for disability.

Julius Otto, mustered out June 21, 1865.

Company G.

James Heaton, veteran, enlisted Jan. 5, 1864.

Company H.

Henry Parker, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Company L

Franklin Austin, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 15, 1863.

Myron S. Cook, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, April 10, 1864.

Highland Honeywell, discharged at end of service, Oct. 22, 1864.

George Henshaw, discharged at end of service, Oct. 22, 1864.

Richard Hoffenden, veteran, enlisted Jan. 5, 1864; mustered out Aug. 17, 1865.

Frank M. Osgood, discharged by order, May 23, 1865.

Samuel N. Woodman, veteran, enlisted Jan. 5, 1864.

Company L.

John Lamaure, mustered out Aug. 17, 1865.

ALLEGAN COUNTY MEMBERS OF THE SECOND CAVALRY.

Company I

Corp. Alonzo Mapes, Martin; enlisted Sept. 3, 1861; veteran, Jan. 5, 1864; sick in hospital.

Corp. Joseph Lindsley, Otsego; enlisted Sept. 15, 1861; discharged for disability, July 31, 1862.

Albert Brewer, discharged for disability, March 22, 1862.

John C. Bugbee, died of disease at Benton Barracks, Feb. 13, 1862.

Leonard Camhout, discharged for disability, July 31, 1862.

William Fessenden, died of disease at Stevenson, Ala., Nov. 22, 1863.

Elick Elickson, veteran, enlisted Jan. 5, 1864; mustered out Aug. 17, 1865.

Seward Harrington, veteran, enlisted Jan. 5, 1864; mustered out Aug. 17, 1865.

Stillman Shepherd, veteran, enlisted Jan. 5, 1864; mustered out Aug. 17, 1865.

THIRD CAVALRY.

This regiment rendezvoused at Grand Rapids in the summer of 1861, and was there mustered into the United States service, November 1st of the same year.

Company A, which proceeded to the front under the command of Captain Gilbert Moyers, was an Allegan County company, and the same county was also represented in every other company of the Third.

Barry had but few men in the regiment, and they were scattered among Companies E, K, L, and M. Under the command of Lieut Col. Robert H. G. Minty, previously major of the Second Michigan Cavalry, the regiment left its rendezvous Nov. 28, 1861, and proceeded to Benton Barracks, Mo., where Col. John K. Mizner soon after assumed command.

It remained at St. Louis until early in the spring of 1862, when it joined Gen. John Pope's “Army of the Mississippi," and actively participated in the operations which resulted in the capture of the rebel strongholds Island No. 10 and New Madrid.

With Gen. Pope's army it then proceeded, via the Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee Rivers, to Pittsburg Landing, where it arrived soon after the battle of Shiloh, and took an active part in the advance of Gen. Halleck's army upon Corinth, Miss.

Immediately after the evacuation of Corinth by Beauregard the Third was ordered to Booneville, Miss., to ascertain the position and strength of the enemy.

While in the performance of this duty a small detachment of the regiment was sent out in advance, under Captain Botham.

It ran on to a rebel force of all arms, drove them from their position, halted, and bivouacked for the night.

The following morning, while eating breakfast, a Union scout discovered the enemy in the vicinity.

The men left their breakfast half eaten, mounted, and hurried forward.

They soon found a small body of rebel Cavalry, who fled before them.

The Union horsemen advanced at a rapid pace, and soon came upon an entire regiment of rebel Cavalry drawn up to dispute their further progress.

There was no time for consideration.

If the little command had then retreated, it would have been attacked and crushed by the elated Confederates.

Captain Botham knew it was essential for Cavalry to get the advantage of its own momentum in a combat, and accordingly shouted the order to charge.

The detachment dashed forward at the top of its speed, burst through the Confederate lines, and then turned and charged back.

The enemy was so demoralized by these movements that no attempt was made to follow.

How many of the foe were killed and wounded was not known, but it was certain that at least eleven were dismounted, for eleven of their horses accompanied the Union force on its returning charge.

After retreating a short distance, Captain Botham halted and sent a dispatch to camp.

About four o'clock in the afternoon he was relieved by the Second Michigan Cavalry, under the command of Col. Philip H. Sheridan.

The latter drove back the enemy four or five miles, and then rejoined the main army.

The regiment was actively engaged in the usual Cavalry duty of picketing and scouting throughout the whole season.

Through the month of August it was at Tuscumbia and Russellville, Ala. On the approach of Price's rebel Cavalry it returned to the vicinity of Corinth. At Iuka, Miss., on the 19th of September, 1862, while in command of Captain L. G. Wilcox,-Col. Mizner being chief of Cavalry,-the regiment was actively engaged, and was specially mentioned in Gen. Rosecrans' report of that battle.

When Price and his defeated rebel army retired from the field the Third hung on his flanks and rear for many miles; becoming several times hotly engaged, and causing him repeatedly to form line of battle to check the Union advance.

At the close of the year ending Nov. 1, 1862, the regiment had lost one hundred and four men who died of disease, seven killed in action, forty-five wounded in action, and fifty-nine taken prisoners.

Its battles and skirmishes to that date were New Madrid, Mo., March 13, 1862; siege of Island No. 10, Mo., March 14th to April 7th; Farmington, Miss., May 5th; siege of Corinth, Miss., May 10th to 31st; Spangler's Mills, Miss., July 26th; Bay Springs, Miss., September 10th; Iuka, Miss., September 19th; Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th; and Hatchie, Miss., October 6th.

It advanced with Gen. Grant's army into Mississippi in November and December, 1862, and engaged the enemy at Holly Springs, November 7th; at Hudsonville, November 14th, where it captured an entire rebel company; at Lumkin's Mill, November 29th; and at Oxford, December 2d; and shared in the defeat of the Union Cavalry at Coffeeville, December 5th.

The following winter it was on active duty in North Mississippi and West Tennessee.

During the year 1863 the Third Cavalry was principally engaged in the arduous service of driving out the numerous bands of guerrillas which infested Western Tennessee and Northern Mississippi, and repelling the incursions of Confederate forces from other quarters; its camp being most of the time at Corinth, Miss.

There were few very severe battles in this kind of warfare, and few opportunities for winning martial glory amid the shock of charging squadrons, but it tested to the utmost the endurance, the fortitude, and the patriotism of the hardy sons of the West.

Day and night, in sun and rain, the Cavalry was kept in motion.

Often, when all the camp lay locked in the deep slumbers of two o'clock in the morning, the silence would suddenly be broken by the stirring sounds of the bugle, and a moment later the officers would be heard going from tent to tent, arousing the half-awakened men with the orders, "Turn out here, Company B." "Turn out, Company F." " Get ready to march with three days' rations."

"Lively now; lively, I say."

Then would follow a hurried drawing of rations, the filling of haversacks and saddle-bags with coffee, pork, and " hard tack," and perhaps the cooking of a hasty meal for immediate consumption.

Presently the bugles would sound ' Boot and Saddle," the horses would be speedily equipped, mounted, and ridden into line, the voices of a dozen captains would be heard in succession commanding "Fours Right-Column Right-March!" and away into the darkness would go the Third Michigan, or the Seventh Kansas, or the Third Iowa, or any two of them, or all of them, as the occasion might seem to require.

Nobody would know where they were going except the field-officers, and very frequently they didn't; but all sorts of rumors would pass rapidly among the boys: "Forrest is coming to attack the camp " "Roddy is out here ten miles;" " Chalmers is raising the devil over at Holly Springs," etc.

A ride would follow, perhaps lasting two or three hours, perhaps extending through three or four days and half as many nights, and sometimes embracing a period of one, two, or three weeks, during which the bold riders were generally compelled to live upon the country they traversed.

In that half-cleared country there was seldom an opportunity for the dashing charge which one naturally associates with the idea of Cavalry service; but whenever they met the foe, which was quite frequently, both sides dismounted, and a lively skirmish with carbines against shot-guns ensued, which lasted until one party or the other retreated.

The retreating party was usually, though not always, the rebels, for notwithstanding the best Confederate troops, after the battle of Corinth, in October, 1862, were taken away to other sections, leaving only undisciplined bands of what was called " shot-gun Cavalry" in Northern Mississippi and Western Tennessee, the " chivalry" fought well.

In such tasks the Third Michigan Cavalry was engaged throughout 1863, taking part in sharp fights (and generally defeating the enemy) at Clifton on the 20th of February; at Panola, Miss., on the 20th of July; at Byhalia, Miss., on the 12th of October; at Wyatt's Ford, Miss., on the 13th of October.

At Grenada, Miss., also, on the 14th of August, the Third led the Union advance, and, after a vigorous fight, drove back the enemy, captured the town, and destroyed more than sixty locomotives and four hundred cars, gathered there by the Confederate authorities.

In the latter part of January, 1864, the regiment being then in winter-quarters at Lagrange, Tenn., three-fourths of the men re-enlisted, and the command became the Third Michigan Veteran Cavalry.

After the men had enjoyed their veteran furlough the command went to St. Louis in March, 1864, and in the latter part of May proceeded, dismounted, to Little Rock, Ark.

It was not mounted until the 1st of August, when it resumed the work of chasing guerrillas, scouting for information, etc., with an experience similar to that already described.

From November, 1864, to February, 1865, the Third was in garrison at Brownsville Station, on the Memphis and Little Rock Railroad, where the men built such a fine16 I appearing set of quarters and stables that the place was commonly called Michigan City, instead of Brownsville Station.

In March, 1865, the regiment, as a part of the First Brigade, First Division, Seventh Army Corps, proceeded to New Orleans, and in April continued its course to Mobile.

After the capture of that place the Third was on outpost duty in that vicinity until the 8th day of May, when it marched across the country to Baton Rouge, La.

In June it set out for Texas by the way of Shreveport, and on the 2d of August arrived at San Antonio, in that State.

Its headquarters remained at San Antonio until the 15th of February, 1866, while successive detachments were scouting the country, protecting the frontier against Mexicans and Indians.

In February, 1866, the regiment was dismounted, mustered out, and sent home; being paid off and disbanded at Jackson, Michigan, on the 15th of March, 1866, after a service of four years and a half unsurpassed as to hardship and fidelity by that of any other regiment in the army.

It is claimed to have captured during the time over two thousand five hundred prisoners, besides those taken in co-operation with other regiments.

OFFICERS AND ENLISTED MEN FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Field and Staff.

Lieutenant-Col. Gilbert Moyers, Allegan; com. Aug. 13, 1862; Major, Feb. 27, 1862; res. Dec. 2, 1864. (See Co. A.)

Major James G. Butler, Allegan; com. July 4, 1865; Captain, Sept. 7, 1864; 1st Lieutenant and q.m., Sept. 15, 1862; 2d Lieutenant, May 25, 1862; com. Sergeant, Sept. 2, 1862; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Company A.

Captain Gilbert Moyers, Allegan; com. Aug. 28, 1861; promoted to Major, Feb. 27, 1862. (See Field and Staff.)

Captain Thomas Dean, Allegan; com. Oct. 26, 1864; 1st Lieutenant, Feb. 16, 1863; 2d lieut., Oct. 1, 1862; enlisted Sept. 1, 1861; res. Oct. 17, 1865.

1st Lieutenant Horace H. Pope, Allegan; com. Aug. 28, 1861; transferred 1st Lieutenant to Co. I, Feb. 27, 1862. 1st Lieutenant

Isaac Wilson, Saugatuck; com. Feb. 27, 1862; 2d Lieutenant Sept. 7, 1861; promoted to Captain Co. K, Oct. 1, 1863.

1st Lieutenant Nathan V. Btuck, Allegan; com. Oct. 26, 1864; 2d Lieutenant, Sept. 13, 1864; res. June 2, 1865.

1st Sergeant Frank W. Mix, Saugatuck; enlisted Sept. 1, 1861; promoted to 2d Lieutenant Co. G, March 26, 1862.

Q.M.-Sergeant George R. Stone, Allegan; enlisted Sept. 6, 1861; discharged by order, Jan. 15, 1863, for promoted in 4th Cavalry.

Sergeant Nelson 0. Moon, Allegan; enlisted Sept. 3, 1861; discharged for disability, Oct. 18, 1862.

Sergeant Robert W. Helmer, Saugatuck; enlisted Sept. 12, 1861; discharged for promoted June 27, 1863.

Corp. Martin C. Garver, Allegan; enlisted Sept. 3, 1861; died in Tennessee of accidental wounds.

Corp. Nathan V. Buck, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 28, 1861; veteran, Jan. 19, 1864, Sergeant; promoted to 2d Lieutenant

Corp. William W. Pullen, Allegan; enl Sept. 2, 1861; discharged for disability, July 14, 1862.

Corp. Stephen Odell, Allegan; enlisted Sept. 9, 1861; veteran, Jan. 19, 1864; Sergeant; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Corp. William Lawrie, Allegan; enlisted Sept. 2, 1861; discharged for disability, July 24, 1863.

Musician Osteen G. Pike, Allegan; enlisted Sept. 3, 1861; discharged for disability, June 14, 1862.

Farrier Solomon Stanton, Saugatuck; enlisted Sept. 4, 1861; discharged for disability, Oct. 28, 1862.

Wagoner William Fisher, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 28, 1861; discharged for disability, Nov. 10, 1862.

Joseph Agan, died of disease in Tennessee.

Samuel Andrews, mustered out Aug. 25, 1865.

James Alger, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864: mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

George D. Bronson, died of disease in Arkansas, March * 1862.

William Bignall, died of disease in Arkansas, Nov. 23, 1864.

Charles Billings, discharged at end of service, Oct. 24, 1864.

Lewis Blaisdell, discharged by order, June 2, 1865.

Edgar Blaisdell, mustered out June 7, 1865.

Lorenzo Brown, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Elijah Brown, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Morris Burr, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

George Bowman, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Benjamin F. Briggs, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Reuben D. Barker, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Daniel Collins, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

George Cody, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Joshua Cornwell, discharged for disability, Aug. 25, 1862.

Lucius T. Cobb, discharged for disability, Jan. 23, 1863.

John Cummins, discharged for disability, March 28, 1864.

William A. Cheney, discharged at end of service, Oct. 24, 1864.

Ralph Cass, died of disease at Cairo, Ill., July 20, 1864.

William Colon, died of disease at Austin, Texas, July 29, 1865.

Warren K. Carman, died of disease at San Antonio, Texas, Oct. 4, 1865.

Andrew Cochrane, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

James K. Dale, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Seymour Dye, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Horatio E. Emery, veteran, enlisted Feb. 1, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Frederick Edwards, died of disease at Rienzi, Miss., July 25, 1862.

A. H. Esterbrook, discharged at end of service, Oct. 24, 1864.

Albert Fenn, discharged at end of service, Oct. 24, 1864.

Theo. Flitcraft, mustered out July 14, 1865.

Joseph Gray, mustered out June 7, 1865.

John Garrison, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Hiram N. Goodell, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Kneeland Graves, died of wounds, April 25, 1863.

Horace P. Haight, died of disease, March 2, 1862.

Washington Howe, died of disease on steamer, June 15, 1865.

Wesley E. Howe, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Jacob Herringer, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Henry Hoak, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Charles H. Jones, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Morris Kent, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Theo. Kleeman, discharged for disability, Nov. 9, 1862.

Bertrand Loomis, died of disease at Memphis, Tenn., March 27, 1864.

Isaac Laws, died of disease at Duvall's Bluff, Ark., July 15, 1864.

Oliver Martin, died of disease at Monterey, Michigan, Sept. 12, 1864.

William H. McCormick, discharged at end of service, Oct. 24, 1864.

William McMillan, discharged at end of service, Oct. 24, 1864.

Christopher Martin, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

William E. Martin, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

John Mocklencute, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; discharged for promotion, March 21, 1865.

Morgan Maybee, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; discharged for promotion, June 5, 1865.

Thomas McQueeny, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Martin Millis, discharged for disability, Feb. 16, 1865.

Bernard McKerney, died of disease at Memphis, Tenn., Feb. 6, 1863.

John Pangburn, died of disease, Sept. 24, 1862.

Alonzo Prentiss, died of disease at Duvall's Bluff, July 6, 1864.

Edward Phelan, discharged for disability, March 28, 1864.

George Pierce, discharged for disability, Dec. 24, 1862.

Benjamin C. Palmer, discharged at end of service, Oct. 24, 18C4.

Benjamin F. Parker, veteran, eul. Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1865.

John Priest, veteran, enlisted Feb. 27, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Charles F. Peck, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Washington Pound, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

John Piersons, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Freeman Ross, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Martin V. Reed, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Lyman Reed, discharged for disability, Aug. 26, 1862.

Miles Reed, discharged for disability, Dec. 20, 1862.

William Rull, discharged for disability, Dec. 20, 1862.

Charles Ruber, died of wounds at Memphis, Feb. 15, 1864.

Stephen D. Stone, discharged for disability, Oct. 12, 1862.

Edward Slocum, discharged at end of service, Oct. 24, 1864.

Seely Squires, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; discharged by order, Oct. 22, 1865.

John Stone, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

William L. Stannard, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

John H. Sage, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866. Henry Starring, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Edmund Starring, died of disease at Memphis, Tenn., April 13, 1864.

Thomas J. Stilson, died of disease at Cairo, Ill., Aug. 8, 1864.

Charles Tiefenthal, discharged at end of service, Oct. 24, 1864.

Frederic Wiseman, discharged at end of service, Oct. 24, 1864.

Seth H. Winn, discharged for disability, Nov. 10, 1862. /

Ralph Winn, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

David White, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; 2d Lieutenant; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Alonzo Wilcox, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Emmett Ward, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Edward Warren,mustered out Feb. 12, 1866. Albert Wilson, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Joshua C. Young, died of disease at New Madrid, Mo., March 8, 1862.

Company B.

2d Lieutenant David White, Saugatuck; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Company C.

1st Lieutenant Frank W. Mix, Saugatuck; comm. May 25, 1862; promoted to Captain in 4th Cavalry. Aug. 13, 1862. (See Co. G.)

Company D.

Chas. Hartwell, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Company E.

2d Lieutenant Jas. G. Butler, com. May 25, 1862; promoted to 1st Lieutenant and q.m., Sept. 15, 1862.

Chas. H. Allen, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Wm. Ballinger, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Almon J. Boyles, died of disease at Duvall's Bluff, Aug. 2, 1864.

Mortimer Culver, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Columbus Greenman, discharged by order, May 3, 1865.

Wm. Orr, discharged by order, Jan. 8, 1865.

John H. Rhodes, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Solomon Staunton, mustered out Sept. 23, 1865.

Company F.

Captain Jas. G. Butler, com. Sept. 7, 1864; promoted to Major, July 4, 1865.

Dennis Considine, mustered out Feb. 12,18t6.

Clias. Deval, discharged for disability, Nov. 1, 1864.

Spencer Deval, died of disease at Duvall's Bluff, Aug. 16, 1864.

Clias. Gleason, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

John L. Simpkins, discharged for disability, Jan. 31, 1863.

Company G.

1st Lieutenant Wm. H. Campion, Allegan; com. Nov. 17, 1864; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

2d Lieutenant Frank W. Mix, promoted to 1st Lieutenant, Co. C, May 25, 1862.

Company H.

James Burnham, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Ephraim Gleason, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Adolphus Haire, died of disease at Duvall's Bluff, July 24, 1864.

John Muunger, mustered out Sept. 23, 1865.

Geo. G. Manning, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Harmon Vosburgh, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Company I.

Captain Horace H. Pope, com. June 11, 1862; 1st Lieutenant, Feb. 27, 1862; resigned Nov. 7, 1864.

John Frank, discharged for disability, Sept. 18, 1862.

Israel McCall, veteran, enlisted Jan. 19, 1864.

Company K.

Captain Isaac Wilson, Saugatuck; com. Oct. 1, 1863; honorably discharged June 6, 1865.

1st Lieutenant Chas. W. Tenny, Allegan; com. Nov. 8, 1865; 2d Lieutenant, Jan. 2, 1865; sergeant; mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Stephen M. Finch, died of disease at Chicago, Dec. 18, 1864.

Company L.

Nelson Beer, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Thos. C. McGinley, mustered out Aug. 11, 1865.

Company M.

Ezra D. Barlow, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

David Barney, mustered out May 25, 1865.

Robert Buchan, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Henry Earl, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

David Fox, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Albro Gardner, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

James Jones, died of disease in Arkansas, Aug. 29, 1864.

Myron Lighthieart, discharged by order, Sept. 1, 1865.

Silas B. Pike, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Samuel Reed, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

William Shoemaker, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Absalom Walker, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

SOLDIERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company E.

Francis A. Benson, died of disease at Memphis, Tenn., June 28, 1864.

William F. Benson, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Company K.

James Ward, veteran, enlisted Jan. 20, 1864; mustered out June 2, 1865.

Company L.

William Ransom, mustered out Feb. 12, 1866.

Company M.

Leonidas Wright, died of disease at Rienzi, Miss., July 2, 1862.

FOURTH CAVALRY.

The Regiment recruited by Col. Minty-Company L, under Captain Pritchard, from Allegan-Other Allegan and Barry Men-Fighting Qualities of the Fourth-It moves to Kentucky in September, 1862 -Chasing John Morgan-Capture of Franklin, Tenn.-Battle of Stone River-Expedition to Harpeth Shoals-Charging and routing a Confederate Brigade-The Battle of Shelbyville-Col. Minty's Report-In Advance of Rosecrans' Army-The Battle in Lookout Valley-Seven thousand Infantry and Cavalry fought all Day by Minty's Brigade-Full Report by Col. Minty-Covering the Retreat from Chickamauga-Fighting Wheeler's Cavalry-All but One Hundred and Twenty-Eight Horses worn out by Service-The Regiment remounted at Nashville-Forward to Atlanta-Fight at Tanner's Bridge-Gallant Service near Kingston-Continuous fighting Brilliant Conflict at Lattimore's Mill-Repulsing an Overwhelming Force-A Rebel Correspondent praises Yankee Valor-Minty's Reports-Advancing and Fighting-In the Trenches as Infantry Mounted and off under Kilpatrick-Defeating the Rebel Horse at Fairburn-March to Lovejoy's-Surrounded by Confederates of all Arms-Cutting out-Minty's Brigade on the Advance-A Splendid Charge-The Cincinnati Commercial's Report-In Pursuit of Hood -Routing the Enemy at Rome-A Corporal's Gallant Defense of a Block-House-The Regiment remounted at Louisville-Once more to the Front-Wilson's Great Raid through Alabama-Dangers of the March-Arriving at Selma-Its Strong Defenses-The Fierce Attack-Splendid Success-Forward into Georgia-Capture of Macon-Pursuit of Jefferson Davis-Surprising his Camp-Particulars of his Capture-A Stalwart Mother-in-law-" Don't shoot him" An Unfortunate Rencontre-A Lucky Scamp-A Special Escort to Washington-The Regiment disbanded-Officers and Soldiers from Allegan County-From Barry County.

THE Fourth Michigan Cavalry, which gained such renown in the Department of the Cumberland during the war for the Union, was recruited and organized during the summer of 1862 by Col. Robert H. G. Minty, previously lieutenant-colonel of the Third Cavalry.

It rendezvoused at Detroit, and was there mustered into the United States service, Aug. 29, 1862.

Of its twelve companies, of one hundred men each, Company L, which took the field under the command of Captain Benjamin D. Pritchard, was recruited almost entirely from Allegan County, while the same county was also represented in the field and staff, non-commissioned staff, and Companies A, C, D, E, F, and G. Barry's representation of less than thirty men was distributed among eight companies.

During its whole term of service it proved a most reliable and gallant regiment.

It was justly proud of its fighting reputation, and accomplished an unusual amount of duty.

In fact, the fighting of the Fourth seems to have been so uniformly vigorous and effective that much difficulty is found in particularizing those engagements in which it was most distinguished.

On the 26th of September, 1862, the regiment left Detroit for the seat of war in Kentucky, receiving its arms at Jeffersonville, Ind.

It at once crossed the Ohio River, and was soon engaged with the redoubtable guerrilla Gen. John H. Morgan.

It was in the advance on the attack on Morgan at Stanford, Ky., Oct. 14, 1862, and pursued him as far as Crab Orchard.

It also led in the attack on Lebanon, Ky., on the 9th of November, five hundred and forty-three of its men pushing in Morgan's pickets at a gallop, entering the town two miles in advance of the infantry, and driving out the guerrilla leader with seven hundred and sixty followers.

After a short stay at Nashville the regiment marched, on the 13th of December, to Franklin, Tenn., drove out the rebels, thirteen hundred strong, killed, wounded, and captured a number of them, and also captured their colors.

On the 26th of December it moved in advance of the army towards Murfreesboro, and began the fighting at Lavergne.

At Stone River, on the 31st, it charged the enemy three times, each time driving a brigade of rebel Cavalry from the field, and having ten of its own men killed and wounded.

The Fourth was the first regiment to enter Murfreesboro on the morning of Jan. 5, 1863, and from the 9th to the 19th of the same month it was engaged in an important Cavalry expedition to Harpeth Shoals, by which Wheeler's, Forrest's, and Wharton's mounted rebels were driven beyond Harpeth River.

In this movement the men suffered terribly from lack of supplies, cold weather, and constantly wet garments.

During the month of February the regiment was constantly on the move, and captured one hundred and forty-five prisoners, including two colonels and fourteen other commissioned officers.

Numerous other expeditions were made from Murfreesboro during the spring of 1863, in all of which more or less prisoners were taken and stores destroyed.

On the 22nd of May following, the regiment, with two companies of United States Cavalry, charged into the camp of the Eighth Confederate, First Alabama, and Second Georgia Cavalry, at Middleton, Tenn., and after a sharp engagement routed them, taking fifty-five prisoners and destroying their camp.

The colors of the First Alabama were captured by the Fourth Michigan, and are now in the office of the State adjutant-general.

At Shelbyville, Tenn., on the 27th of June, 1863, the success attending the brigade commanded by Col. Minty was mainly accomplished by the brilliant and tenacious fighting of the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, then commanded by Major Frank W. Mix. Col. Minty, in his report of this battle, says: - Gen. Benjamin D. Pritchard was born in Nelson, Portage Co., Ohio, in 1835.

He received an academical course of instruction in the public schools, and at the Western Reserve College, in his native State, where he continued to reside until 1856, when he became a resident of Allegan, Michigan

Engaging in the study of law, he completed his course in the law department of the University of Michigan in 1860, and soon after formed a law-partnership with Hon. William B. Williams, late member of Congress, and now commissioner of railroads.

He recruited Company L of the Fourth Michigan Cavalry in the summer of 1862, and was commissioned its captain August 13th of the same year.

From that time until the close of the war he performed most gallant and efficient service, which is described at length in the accompanying history of his regiment.

He was brevetted a brigadier-general of United States Volunteers, to rank from May 10, 1865, for faithful and meritorious services in the capture of Jeff Davis, and was mustered out of service with his regiment July 1, 1865.

He again resumed his law-practice with Mr. Williams, and in 1866 was elected, on the Republican ticket, commissioner of the land-office of the State, and was re-elected in 1868.

In 1878 he was elected State treasurer by the Republicans, over Alex. McFarlan, Democrat, and Herman Goeschel, National. Gen. Pritchard is still a resident of Allegan, and, besides attending to his professional duties, is president of the First National Bank of that village.

At Shelbyville I found myself, with a force of fifteen hundred men, in front of formidable breastworks, with an abatis of over one fourth of a mile in width in front of them, behind which Gens. Wheeler and Martin had an opposing force of four thousand men and three pieces of artillery.

I detached the Fourth Michigan, in command of Major Mix, well to the right, with orders to force their way through the abatis, and assault the works, and if successful to turn to the left and sweep up the entrenchments, promising that so soon as I heard their rifles speaking I would make the direct assault on the Murfreesboro and Shelbyville pike.

They did their work so well that as I entered the works on the main road they joined me from the right, having carried the works and taken prisoners from six different regiments.

The fruits of that day's work were the whole of the enemy's artillery and six hundred prisoners, while over two'hundred dead bodies were afterwards taken out of Duck River, into which I had driven Wheeler and his entire command."

After two or three minor skirmishes the regiment entered Chattanooga, Tenn., on the 11th of September, 1863.

On the 13th, Col. Minty's command-viz., the Fourth United States, Fourth Michigan, and Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry regiments, and one section of the Chicago Board of Trade battery-marched from Chattanooga and reported to Major-Gen. Crittenden, commanding the Twenty-First Army Corps, at Gordon's Mills.

The brigade was ordered to cross Mission Ridge into Lookout Valley on the 14th, and on the three succeeding days was employed in learning the enemy's whereabouts.

On the 18th it was warmly engaged with a large force of the enemy's infantry, the combat being thus described in Col. Minty's report:

"At six A.M. of September 18th I sent one hundred of the Fourth United States Cavalry towards Leet's, and one hundred from the Fourth Michigan and Seventh Pennsylvania towards Ringgold.

At about seven A.M. couriers arrived from both scouts, with information that the enemy was advancing in force.

I immediately strengthened my pickets on the Lafayette road, and moved forward with the Fourth Michigan and one battalion of the Fourth Regulars and the section of artillery, and took up a position on the eastern slope of Pea Vine Ridge, and dispatched couriers to Major-Gen.

Granger, at Rossville; Col. Wilder, at Alexander's Bridge; Gen. Wood, at Gordon's Mill; and Gen. Crittenden, at Crawfish Springs.

The enemy's infantry in force, with about two hundred Cavalry, advanced steadily, driving my skirmish-line back to my position on the side of the ridge.

The head of a column getting into good range, I opened on them with the artillery, when they immediately deployed and advanced a strong skirmish-line.

At this moment I observed a heavy column of dust moving from the direction of Graysville towards Dyer's Ford.

"I sent a courier to Col. Wilder, asking him to send a force to hold the ford and cover my left, and sent my train across the creek.

As the force from Graysville advanced I fell back until I arrived on the ground I had occupied in the morning.

Here Col. Miller, with two regiments and two mountain howitzers, reported to me from Col. Wilder's brigade.

I directed Col. Miller to take possession of the ford, and again advanced and drove the rebel skirmish-line over the ridge and back on their line of battle in the valley, where a force was in position which I estimated at seven thousand men, thirteen sets of regimental colors being visible.

"The rebel line advanced, and I was steadily driven back across the ridge.

My only means of crossing the creek was Reed's bridge, a narrow, frail structure, which was covered with loose boards and fence-rails, and a bad ford about three hundred yards higher up.

I masked my artillery behind some shrubs near the ford, leaving one battalion of the Fourth United States to support it, and ordered the remainder of that regiment to cross the bridge, holding the Fourth Michigan and Seventh Pennsylvania in line to cover the movement. "

Before the first squadron had time to cross, the head of a rebel column carrying their arms at 'right shoulder shift,' and moving at the double-quick, as steadily as if at drill, came through the gap not five hundred yards from the bridge.

The artillery opening on them from an unsuspected quarter evidently took them by surprise, and _.. 4.

I immediately checked their advance, again causing them to deploy immediately checked their advance, again causing them to deploy.

The Fourth Michigan followed the Fourth United States, and the Seventh Pennsylvania the Fourth Michigan, one squadron of the Fourth United States, under Lieutenant Davis, most gallantly covering the crossing of the Seventh Pennsylvania.

One squadron of the Fourth Michigan, under Lieutenant J. H. Simpson, on picket on the Harrison road, was cut off by the rapid advance of the enemy.

They made a gallant resistance, and eventually swam the creek without the loss of a man.

The artillery crossed the ford in safety, and I placed it in position to dispute the crossing of the bridge, from which Lieutenant

Davis' men had thrown most of the loose planking.

"Here I was soon hotly engaged, and was holding the rebels in check, when I received a note from the officer in charge of my wagon-train (which I had sent back to Gordon's Mill), stating, ' Col. Wilder has fallen back from Alexander's Bridge; he is retreating towards Gordon's Mill, and the enemy is crossing the river in force at all points.'

I sent an order to Col. Miller to join me without delay, and on his arrival I fell back to Gordon's Mill, skirmishing with the enemy, who followed me closely.

"With less than one thousand men, the old ' First Brigade' had disputed the advance of seven thousand from seven o'clock in the morning until five o'clock in the evening, and during that time fell back only five miles.

"On arriving at Gordon's Mill my men were dismounted, and with Col. Wilder's brigade of mounted infantry, and a brigade from Gen. Van Cleve's division, repulsed a heavy attack about eight o'clock P.M.

We lay in position all night within hearing of the enemy, and were without fires, although the night was bitterly cold.

At break of day Gen. Palmer's division relieved us.

I then moved to the rear and procured forage for our horses and rations for the men, who had been entirely without since the previous morning."

During the 18th the regiment lost fourteen men, killed, wounded, and missing.

Among the wounded was Captain Pritchard, then in command of a battalion.

The next day it fired the first shots in the disastrous battle of Chickamauga, and subsequently protected the left and rear of Rosecrans' army and the trains moving to Chattanooga.

On the 20th, while assisting to hold the enemy in check until the shattered Union forces could retire from the field, Minty's brigade attacked and defeated Scott's rebel brigade of Cavalry and mounted infantry, driving it back across the creek.

The regiment bivouacked on the ground it had held, but the next day was compelled to share in the general retreat.

On the 30th of September it was driven by Wheeler's rebel Cavalry near Cotton's Ferry, on the Tennessee; but from the 1st to the 3d of October the tables were turned, and the Fourth had the pleasure of following its late pursuers with ardor and success.

By the 1st of November, 1863, the service of the regiment had been so severe that only three hundred of the men were mounted.

This battalion was actively engaged on picket and scout duty in Southeastern Tennessee and Northern Georgia and Alabama throughout the winter; the number of mounted men being reduced by the latter part of March, 1864, to one hundred and twenty-eight.

Meanwhile, the dismounted men had been employed in various duties in the same locality, and also in Middle Tennessee.

The regiment, except the one hundred and twenty-eight mounted men, set out for Nashville on the 28th of March, 1864, where, under the supervision of Captain Pritchard, the men received new horses and equipments, and were armed with Spencer carbines.

On the 14th of April, under the command of Major F. W. Mix, the regiment joined the Second Cavalry Division at Columbia, Tenn.

Thence it advanced with eight hundred and seventy-eight men into Captain Pritchard led the advance battalion in this assault.

In Georgia, where the Cavalry began its arduous and dangerous labors in co-operation with Gen. Sherman's army, which was then advancing on Atlanta.

On the 15th of May the command attacked the enemy's Cavalry at Tanner's Bridge, nine miles from Rome, Ga., routing and pursuing them seven miles, when, meeting a superior force with artillery, it retired; this regiment having lost in the affair ten wounded and missing.

From Woodland, on the 18th, seven companies, under Captain Pritchard, were sent toward Kingston on a reconnoissance.

Meeting the enemy's Cavalry, the detachment drove them several miles, until at length it was stopped by the rebel infantry.

The opposing horsemen then threw themselves on the flanks and rear of the Michigan men, but the latter drew their sabres and cut their way out, with a loss of twenty-four in killed, wounded, and missing.

Crossing the Allatoona Mountains and Etowah River, Col. Minty's command moved on to Dallas, where it was warmly engaged, and captured many prisoners.

It also participated in all the flank movements which forced Gen. Johnston's rebel army back from one stronghold to another, resulting in the engagements at New Hope Church and Big Shanty.

On the 9th of June the regiment assisted in driving the enemy's Cavalry, supported by infantry, to the base of Kenesaw Mountain, capturing a number of prisoners, and on the 12th again encountered the enemy at McAfee's Cross-Roads, where a line of rebel entrenchments was carried.

Skirmishing with the enemy's Cavalry was daily continued until the 20th of June, 1864, on which day, at Lattimore's Mill, on Noonday Creek, two battalions of the Fourth performed one of the most brilliant feats of the war.

A small detachment of the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry had crossed the creek, and, becoming hotly engaged with a superior force of the enemy, Captain Pritchard, with two battalions of the Fourth Michigan, was ordered across to its support.

This force had scarcely reached the position assigned it when a whole rebel division, eight times their own number, swept down upon the Pennsylvania and Michigan men, with the evident purpose of driving them back across the creek.

They did not, however, propose to go immediately, so, dismounting and availing themselves of the protection afforded by the inequalities of the ground, they met their assailants with terrific and continuous volleys from their Spencer carbines.

Again and again did the rebels bear down upon them, making desperate efforts to destroy the little force of Unionists, but being as often repulsed.

At length, after holding their ground against the repeated assaults of the enemy for more than two hours, they retired slowly and in good order at the command of Col. Minty.

The following extract from a letter published in the Memphis Appeal, at Atlanta, Ga., June 25, 1864, gives the rebel version of this fight, and shows very plainly the gallantry of Minty's brigade and the immense preponderance of the rebel force: "On the 20th instant two divisions, Kelly's and Martin's, and one brigade, Williams', of our Cavalry, went round to the left flank and 'The Memphis Appeal was published at half a dozen different places, to which it was successively driven by the victorious Unionists. rear of Sherman's army, it was said to capture a brigade of Yankee Cavalry situated at McAfee's.

We succeeded in getting to the right place, where the enemy, Minty's brigade, was vigorously attacked by Williams' and a portion of Anderson's brigade.

After a sharp conflict the enemy was driven from the field, Ilannon's brigade having come up and attacked them on the flank.

The Yankees fought desperately and fell back slowly, with what loss we are unable to ascertain, as they carried off their wounded and most of their dead.

To one who was an eye-witness, but not an adept in the 'art of war,' it seemed very strange that the whole Yankee force was not surrounded and captured.

Dibrell's brigade was drawn up a few hundred yards from and in full view of the battle-ground, with Martin's whole division immediately in the rear.

This is one of the best fighting brigades the Yankees have, and to have captured or routed it would have added a bright feather to the plume of the successful hero accomplishing the feat.

After he (Minty) had been driven from his first position, Martin's whole division was brought up, and lost several men of Allen's brigade.

Brig.-Gen. Allen had his horse shot.

The Eighth Confederate and Fifth Georgia of Anderson's brigade lost several killed and wounded.

Williams' Kentucky brigade also lost several good soldiers."

Col. Minty, in his report, after quoting this statement, added:

"According to the above, there was the following rebel force in the field: Kelly's and Martin's divisions, consisting of the brigades of Anderson, six regiments; Hannon's, five regiments; Allen's, five regiments; and Johnson's, five regiments; and the independent brigades of Williams and Dibrell, composed of five regiments each; say in all, thirty-one regiments, of which the Fifth Georgia numbered over eight hundred.

The entire force I had engaged was, of the Seventh Pennsylvania one hundred and seventy men, and of the Fourth Michigan two hundred and eighty-three; in all, four hundred and fifty-three.

These few men held their ground against the repeated assaults of the enemy for over two hours, and when I ordered them to fall back, they retired slowly, in good order.

I beg to call the attention of the general commanding to the heavy loss sustained by this small force.

In a loss of over twelve per cent., the very small proportion reported missing shows how steadily and stubbornly they fought."

In a note appended to this report, Col. Minty said: "My loss in this engagement was two officers and sixty-five men.

The Marietta (Ga.) papers acknowledge a loss of ninety-four killed and three hundred and fifty-one wounded.

Two battalions of the Fourth Michigan repulsed three sabre charges made by the Eighth Confederate and Fifth Georgia, numbering over one thousand men, and one battalion led by Captain Hathaway repulsed a charge made by Williams' Kentucky brigade by a counter-charge."

Of the two hundred and eighty three officers and men of the Fourth engaged at Lattimore's mill, thirty-seven were killed and wounded, and three were reported missing, Lieutenant T. W. Sutton being among the killed.

Having crossed the Chattahoochee River, the regiment, under the command of Major F. W. Mix, participated in a constant succession of raids and fights until the 1st of August, 1864, during which many miles of railroad-track and many bridges were destroyed, thus impeding the operations of the enemy and facilitating those of Gen. Sherman, who had steadily advanced to the front of Atlanta.

From the 1st to the 14th of August it was employed as infantry, occupying a portion of the trenches before the besieged city. Col. Minty's brigade then received orders to report to Gen. Kilpatrick.

At one o'clock on the morning of the 18th the command broke camp, and quietly moved out to the rendezvous of the expedition at Sandtown, arriving there at six A.M.

The movement was commenced under cover of darkness, to prevent, if possible, any information being obtained by the enemy, yet a rebel letter captured on the 20th, dated at Atlanta on the 18th, gave the number of Minty's command and the destination of the raiders.

Gen. Kilpatrick's force consisted of the Third Cavalry Division, commanded by himself in person, and Minty's and Long's brigades of the Second Cavalry Division, in all some five thousand men, with two sections of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery.

On the evening of the 19th the combined forces moved out toward the West Point Railroad, which was reached near Fairburn, where the first rebel assault was made.

Ross' and Ferguson's brigades of rebel Cavalry struck the Union column on the left flank with so much force as to cut the Seventh Pennsylvania in two, but it was immediately reinforced by the Fourth Michigan, when a vigorous and irresistible attack was made on the enemy, driving him from the ground in great disorder.

The rebels were pursued to Flint River, and finally into the town of Jonesboro', two thirds of the town being destroyed by fire.

While this was being done the rebel Cavalry was reinforced by a brigade of infantry.

Kilpatrick's main object being to destroy the railroad rather than to whip the enemy, except when necessary in the execution of his purpose, he left Jonesboro' and marched directly toward Lovejoy's Station, on the Macon road.

At a point one and one-half miles from the station the command began destroying the railroad.

In the mean time the enemy was hurrying forward heavy bodies of troops by rail from Atlanta and Macon, and ere much time had elapsed Kilpatrick was surrounded by from eighteen to twenty thousand rebel troops of all arms, commanded by Gens. Cleburn, Reynolds, Jackson, Armstrong, Ferguson, and Ross.

The position of Gen. Kilpatrick's force and the overpowering numbers opposing him rendered his condition most critical, leaving him to choose between surrender and the imminent prospect of destruction in the effort to extricate himself.

He chose the latter alternative, and Minty's brigade was instantly formed in a line of regimental columns to lead the charge.

The Seventh Pennsylvania was on the right, the Fourth Michigan in the centre, and the Fourth United States on the left, with Long's brigade in the rear, and the Third Division, under Kilpatrick, on the left of the road.

The advancing enemy was immediately charged upon by Minty's men, who, with drawn sabres, burst through the ranks of the rebels like a whirlwind, chasing them off the field, opening the way for the safe passage of other commands and the accomplishment of the objects of the expedition.

A correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial described this charge of Minty's brigade as follows:

“While the various regiments were being maneuvered into position to meet the onslaught of the rebels, who were sweeping down upon them, the men had time to comprehend the danger that surrounded them,-rebels to the right of them, rebels to the left of them, rebels in rear of them, rebels in front of them; surrounded, there was no salvation but to cut their way out.

Visions of Libby prison, Andersonville, and starvation flitted through their imagination, and they saw that the deadly conflict could not be avoided.

Placing himself at the head of his brigade, the gallant and fearless Minty drew his sabre, and his voice rang out clear and loud: 'Attention, column! Forward, regulate by the centre regiment, trot, March!-gallop, march!' and away the brigade went with a yell that echoed away across the valleys.

“The ground from which the start was made, and over which they charged, was a plantation of about two square miles, thickly strewn with patches of woods, deep water-cuts, fences, ditches, and morasses.

At the word away went the bold dragoons at the height of their speed.

Fences were jumped, and ditches were no impediment.

The rattle of the sabres mingled with that of the mess-kettles and frying-pans that jingled at the side of the pack-mule brigade, which was madly urged forward by the frightened darkies who straddled the animals.

Charging for their lives and yelling like devils, Minty and his troopers encountered the rebels behind a hastily constructed barricade of rails.

Pressing their rowels deep into their horses' flanks, and raising their sabres aloft, on, on, on, nearer and nearer to the rebels they plunged.

The terror-stricken enemy could not withstand the thunderous wave of men and horse that threatened to engulf them.

They broke and ran just as Minty and his men were urging their horses for the decisive blow.

In an instant all was confusion.

The yells of the horsemen were drowned in the clashing of steel and the groans of the dying.

On pressed Minty in pursuit, his men's sabres striking right and left, and cutting down everything in their path.

The rebel horsemen were seen to reel and pitch headlong to the earth, while their frightened steeds rushed pell-mell over their bodies.

Many of the rebels defended themselves with almost superhuman strength; but it was all in vain.

The charge of Federal steel was irresistible.

The heads and limbs of some of the rebels were actually severed from their bodies.

It was, all admit, one of the finest charges of the war.

The individual instances of heroism were many.

Hardly a man flinched, and when the brigade came out more than half the sabres were stained with human blood."

The command reached Lithonia on the 21st; having made a circuit around Atlanta and the rebel armies, and having been in the saddle, and almost constantly engaged, since early in the morning of the 18th.

After the fall of Atlanta the regiment moved northward, and on the 4th of October, 1864, joined its division-the Second-at Marietta, Ga., with which it started in pursuit of Hood's rebel army, then on its way into Middle Tennessee; having had numerous skirmishes with its rear-guard.

One of the sharpest of these encounters occurred near Rome, Ga., on the 13th of October.

A body of Union troops was occupying Rome, and a force of mounted rebels undertook to drive it out.

While a brisk skirmish was going on, Minty's brigade crossed the Oostenaula River and made a sabre charge on the flank of the Confederates.

The latter fled in the utmost confusion.

The Unionists rode over a rebel battery, captured it in an instant, and then pursued the enemy several miles, capturing many prisoners, and sabring those who resisted.

The Fourth Michigan alone took one hundred and twenty-eight prisoners, which was about the number of the mounted men in the regiment; nearly all the horses having been worn out by the severity of the service.

The regiment, in pursuit of Hood's forces, then re-crossed the Oostenaula and marched, vid Rome, Kingston, Adairsville, Resaca, Summersville, and Galesville, Ala., to Little River, where, on the 20th, it engaged Wheeler's Cavalry; forcing the enemy to retire.

Meanwhile the dismounted men, whose horses had been killed and worn out by the arduous service of the past six months, were sent to the rear from time to time, and employed in garrisoning block-houses on the line of the Nashville and Huntsville Railroad.

On the 17th of September, 1864, Corp. Charles M. Bickford and seventeen men of the regiment, stationed in a block-house, were attacked by Wheeler's rebel Cavalry, a force of several thousand, with artillery, but, although the assailants shelled the blockhouse for over five hours, they could not compel the gallant little squad to surrender, and finally retired, after having eight men killed and sixty wounded.

The corporal was promoted to be a commissioned officer, and the names of his men were honorably mentioned in general orders.

After the fight at Little River, before mentioned, the mounted men of the regiment, then numbering but about one hundred, transferred their horses to the Third Brigade, and proceeded to Louisville, Ky.

The dismounted men also concentrated at the same point.

They remained there until the latter part of December, 1864, being in the mean time remounted and furnished with new Spencer seven-shot carbines.

On the 28th of December, commanded by Lieutenant-Col. Benjamin D. Pritchard, the Fourth again moved southward, with twenty-six officers and six hundred and ninety-six enlisted men.

It proceeded by way of Nashville to Gravelly Springs, Ala., where it remained until the 12th of March, 1865.

Here its members suffered severely for want of rations, and were obliged to live on parched corn for several days.

On the latter day the regiment broke camp, and set out on Gen. Wilson's great Cavalry movement through Alabama and Georgia.

Four divisions of Cavalry stretched in an almost interminable line as the command made its way southward over mountains, rivers, creeks, and swamps, building miles of corduroy-roads, etc.

It crossed the Black Warrior River on the 29th of March by swimming the horses, losing one man and from thirty to forty horses.

During the night the Locust was crossed in the same manner, and on the 31st Shades Creek and the Cahawba River was crossed by passing the accompanying battery over the railroad bridge, which was temporarily floored with ties; five or six horses and mules being killed by falling nearly a hundred feet from the bridge to the river.

The enemy's Cavalry under Forrest was encountered and defeated at Mulberry Creek on the 1st of April, and on the 2d, Minty's brigade, being in the advance, started at four A.M. on the direct road to Selma; arriving in front of that place at two o'clock P.M.

This, the chief city of Central Alabama, was surrounded by two lines of bastioned entrenchments.

The works were found to be stronger and more perfect than those at Atlanta; consisting of an inner line of redans and redoubts, mounted with 12-pounder howitzers and 20-pounder Parrots.

The main and outer line, which extended entirely around the city from river to river, consisted of twenty-five redoubts or bastions connected by curtains, the parapet being about twelve feet high and surrounded by a ditch and well-built palisade, in front of which was swampy ground, partially covered with abatis.

These works were defended by Gen. Forrest with a force estimated at nine thousand.

The Second Division, in which was the Fourth Michigan, was ordered to assault the works on the Summerville road, and the Fourth Division those on the Plantersville road.

About the time the assault was to take place, the rebel Gen. Chalmers attacked the rear of the Second Division.

Three regiments were detached to oppose him; the remainder, including the Fourth Michigan, swept forward to the assault.

Besides the men holding the horses, the force resisting Chalmers, and other detachments, there were about fifteen hundred men of the Second Division in the assaulting column.

These moved forward under a terrific fire from the breastworks, which was followed by a swift succession of volleys from the Spencer carbines of the Unionists steadily aimed at the top of the parapet.

Col. Long, the division commander, was shot in the head at the beginning of the assault, and Col. Minty,* of the Fourth Michigan, assuming command, led the division against the works.

Increasing their pace, the Unionists dashed forward with resounding cheers, swarmed into the ditch and over the breastworks, killed, captured, or drove away the rebels almost in an instant, and took possession of the enemy's main line in twenty minutes after the first advance.

Three hundred and twenty-four out of the fifteen hundred assailants were killed and wounded in this brief period.

The inner line of works was also taken by the Second Division by the time the Fourth Division arrived at the outer line.

The result of the whole operation was the capture of one hundred pieces of artillery, two thousand eight hundred prisoners, and an immense amount of ammunition and stores.

On the 7th of April the command moved eastward; passing through Montgomery and Columbus into Georgia.

A portion of Minty's brigade,-the Fourth Michigan and Third Ohio, commanded by Lieutenant-Col. Pritchard, marched all the night of the 17th of April to save the double bridges over the Flint River, reaching them early in the morning of the 18th, when a gallant sabre charge was made by one battalion of the Fourth Michigan, which carried the bridges and captured every man of the rebel force left to destroy them.

The Second Division, which was in the advance, after a rapid march of twenty-seven miles on the 20th of April, was met some twelve or fifteen miles from Macon, Ga., by a rebel officer with a flag of truce, who informed Col. Minty that an armistice had been stipulated between the contending armies, and requested him not to enter Macon. Col. Minty immediately reported the matter to Gen. Wilson, and awaited orders.

The general replied that he had no notification of any armistice existing and that he should not stay out of Macon; and ordered Col. Minty to move forward.

Thereupon Col. Minty said to the rebel officer, ' I will give you five minutes start (taking out his watch) in returning to Macon, and you had better make good use of it."

The officer and his escort set out on the gallop.

Col. Minty sat on his horse, watch in hand, until the five minutes had elapsed, when he returned the watch and gave the order:

" Forward! Gallop, March!"

The division dashed forward, in thundering column, toward Macon.

Over hill and down dale it pursued its headlong course.

The flag-bearers were run down and passed; some small detachments stationed along the road were swept away like chaff, and at six p.M. the division dashed forward.

It is reported that Col. Minty was the first man to get inside the enemy's works alive.

In this charge the Fourth United States and Third Ohio were at first repulsed, but the Fourth Michigan, under Lt.-Col. Pritchard, pressed steadily onward, and were the first to leap over the works.

On into Macon, where it received the unconditional surrender of Gen. Howell Cobb and about two thousand men, with sixty-two pieces of artillery.

Being there officially notified of the surrender of the rebel armies under Lee and Johnston, Gen. Wilson stayed the farther advance of his corps.

Gen. Cobb was highly indignant at the unceremonious manner in which the Union officers possessed themselves of Macon, and gave it as his opinion that when the matter was referred to the proper headquarters the Union troops would be ordered to withdraw.

On the other hand, Gen. Wilson replied in most emphatic language that when his troops left the city, under such circumstances, there would not remain one brick upon another.

On the 7th of May the Fourth Michigan, four hundred and forty strong, under Lieutenant-Col. Pritchard, left Macon for the purpose of capturing Jefferson Davis and his party, who were known to be making their way toward the coast.

Having struck the trail of the fugitives at Abbeville on the 9th of May, Col. Pritchard selected one hundred and fifty-three of his best-mounted officers and men, and moved rapidly by a circuitous route to intercept them.

At Irwinsville, at one o'clock in the morning of the 10th of May, the colonel learned that a train, which probably belonged to Davis, was encamped a mile and a half distant.

Moving out into the vicinity of the camp, he sent Lieutenant Purinton, with twenty-five men, to wait on the other side of it.

At daybreak Col. Pritchard and his men advanced silently, and without being observed, to within a few rods of the camp, then dashed forward and secured the whole camp before the astonished inmates could grasp their weapons, or even fairly arouse themselves from their slumbers.

A chain of mounted guards was immediately placed around the camp, and dismounted sentries were stationed at the tents and wagons.

While this was going on, Corporal George M. Munger, of Company C, and Private Andrew Bee, of Company L, observed two persons in women's dress moving rapidly away from one of the tents.

"That ought to be attended to," said one of the soldiers.

Yes," replied the other; and Munger immediately rode around in front of the two persons and ordered a “Halt!"

"This is my mother-in-law," said one of them; “she is going after some water; can't you let her pass?"

Her companion, a tall person, much bent, wrapped in a woman's "water-proof," with a shawl over the head and a pail in one hand, remained silent.

“No, you can't pass," replied Munger.

At that moment other soldiers rode up, and the hitherto silent personage, seeing that further disguise was useless, straightened up, dropped the pail, threw off the water-proof and shawl, and disclosed a tall, thin, sharp-faced, sour-looking man, with gray hair, gray whiskers under his chin, and one blind eye.

No one at first seemed to recognize in this forlorn fugitive the renowned chief of the defunct Confederacy.

Mrs. Davis, however (for she was his companion), had her wifely fears aroused by the grim faces and clanking arms around her, and threw her arms around her husband's neck, exclaiming, "Don’t shoot him! Don’t shoot him!”

“ I’ll Let them shoot," said Davis, "if they choose; I may as well die here as anywhere."

But no one was inclined to be his executioner, and the squad, with the two prisoners, moved back toward the tents.

Mrs. Davis, when questioned, admitted that her companion was the ex-President of the Confederacy.

Meanwhile Col. Pritchard had taken the greater part of the force and gone to the assistance of Lieutenant Purinton, in whose front heavy firing was heard.

It proved to come from a most unfortunate rencontre with a detachment of the First Wisconsin Cavalry, which was also in pursuit of Davis, and the advance-guard of which began firing on Purinton's men before ascertaining who they were.

After this error was discovered (which was not until several men had been killed and wounded), Col. Pritchard returned to camp and discovered that, besides Davis, his wife, and four children, his command had also captured two of his aides de-camp, his private secretary, several other Confederate officers, thirteen private servants, waiting-maids, etc., making a total of about thirty persons.

As he rode up, Col. Pritchard was accosted by Davis, who asked if he was the officer in command.

The colonel said he was, and asked how he should address his interlocutor. “Call me what or whoever you please," said the rebel chieftain.

"Then I shall call you Davis," replied Pritchard.

After a moment's hesitation the former admitted that that was his name.

He then suddenly drew himself up with great dignity and exclaimed, “I suppose you consider it bravery to charge a train of defenseless women and children; but it is theft; it is vandalism."

Without stopping to inquire whether the distinguished prisoner considered himself a woman or a child, the colonel set out with his command for Macon, joining the rest of the regiment on the way.

The lucky man of the expedition was one Michael Lynch, (A worthless, quarrelsome, unprincipled fellow.) and deserter from the Confederate army, who had enlisted in the Fourth Michigan.

He secured a pair of saddle-bags containing five thousand dollars in Confederate gold.

Although vigilant search was made for it by the officers, he managed to conceal it, got out of camp with it, and buried it.

He was strongly suspected from various circumstances of being the person who had it, and the acting adjutant-general of the brigade endeavored to persuade him to give it up, saying it would certainly be found, and then he would lose it, but if he would give it up he (the officer) would use his influence to have it, or a part of it, given back to him.

“Well now, captain," said Lynch, with great apparent frankness, "I haven't got that money, but if had it I shouldn't be green enough to give it up."

"Why, what could you do with it?" queried the officer.

"What could I do with it?" replied Lynch; “why, I would bury it, and after I was discharged I would come back and dig it up.

But then I haven't got it."

And this was precisely what he had done, and what after his discharge he did do.

From Macon, Col. Pritchard, with twenty-five officers and men, was ordered to Washington, as a special escort for Davis and his party.

While this party went to Washington (giving Mr. Davis into the custody of the commandant at Fortress Monroe), the rest of the regiment returned, by way of Atlanta and Chattanooga, to Nashville, where it was mustered out and paid off on the 1st of July, 1865.

It reached Detroit on the 10th of the same month.

OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Those marked with an asterisk were present at the capture of Davis.

Field and Staff.

Lieutenant-Col. Benj. D. Pritchard,* Allegan; com. Nov. 26, 1864; bvt. brig.-gen. U. S. Vols. May 10, 1865, "for faithful and meritorious services in the capture of Jeff. Davis;" mustered out. with regiment, July 1, 1865.

Major Frank W. Mix, Allegan; com. Feb. 18, 1863; Captain Aug. 13, 1862; 1st Lieutenant 3d Cavalry., May 25, 1862; res. Nov. 24, 1864.

1st Lieutenant and Q.-M. Geo. R. Stone, Allegan; com. March 18, 1863; promoted Captain Co. A, Aug. 25, 1864.

1st Lieutenant and Q.M. Perry J. Davis,* Allegan; com. Aug. 23, 1864; bvt. Captain U. S. Vols. May 10, 1865, “for meritorious services in the capture of Jeff. Davis;" mustered out July 1, 1865.

Noncommissioned Staff.

Com.-Sergeant Harlan P. Dunning, Allegan; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Principal Musician John B. Champion, Allegan; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Company A.

Captain Geo. R. Stone, Allegan; com. Aug. 25, 1864; 1st Lieutenant and q.m. March 18, 1863; mustered out July 1, 1865.

1st Lieutenant Thos. J. Parker, Allegan; com. Feb. 18, 1863; 2d Lieutenant Co. L, Aug. 1, 1862; res. Dec. 21, 1864.

Madison Bipler, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., April 8, 1864.

Gilbert Haight, mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

Marion Hicks, died of disease at Nashville, Feb. 12, 1864.

Daniel Hendrick, died of disease at Nashville, Feb. 4, 1864.

John Nero, mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

Company C.

Peter Semyn, died of disease at Nashville, July 21, 1865.

Andrew I. Shepherd, mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

Company D.

2d Lieutenant Chas. W. Fisk, Allegan; com. Dec. 6, 1863; Sergeant Co. L; promoted 1st Lieutenant Co. H, Aug. 1, 1864; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Company E.

Geo. W. Banks, discharged by order, June 21, 1865.

Sherman Egan, mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

Company F.

Captain John H. Simpson, Allegan; com. Dec. 10, 1864; 1st. lieutenant Aug. 23, 1863; 2d Lieutenant March 31, 1863; Sergeant Co. L; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Company G.

Timothy C. Green, mustered out. Hiram Comstock, died of disease at Chattanooga, June 13, 1864.

Company L.

Captain Benj. D. Pritchard, Allegan; com. July 25, 1862; promoted Lieutenant-col. Nov. 26, 1864.

1st Lieutenant Isaac Lamoreaux, Allegan; com. Aug. 4, 1862.

1st Lieutenant Geo. R. Stone, Allegan; com. March 1, 1863; apt. Q.M., March 18, 1863.

2d Lieutenant Thos. J. Parker, Allegan; com. Aug. 1, 1862; promoted 1st Lieutenant, Co. A. 2d Lieutenant

Samuel F. Murphy, Allegan; com. Jan. 18, 1865; mustered out July 1, 1865.

1st Sergeant John F. Beebe, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 1, 1862; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Q.M. Sergeant John H. Simpson, Allegan; enlisted July 26, 1862; promoted 2d Lieutenant

Company F.

Com.-Sergeant Orson D. Dunham, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 14, 1862; discharged for disability, March 18, 1863.

Sergeant Chas. W. Fisk, Allegan; enlisted July 31, 1862; promoted 2d Lieutenant

Company B.

Sergeant Hiram B. Hudson, Allegan; enlisted July 21, 1862; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Sergeant Francis L. Hickock, Allegan; enlisted July 28, 1862; discharged by order, June 7, 1865.

Sergeant Silas F. Stauber, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 1, 1862; discharged for promotion, May 22, 1864.

Sergeant Samuel F. Murphy, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 11, 1862q promoted 2d Lieutenant

Sergeant Chas. Carter, Allegan; enlisted July 30, 1862; discharged for disability, Sept. 26, 1864.

Corp. Samuel S. Baldwin, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 1, 1862; discharged Feb. 16, 1863.

Corp. Horatio N. Price, Allegan; enlisted July 21, 1862; died at Murfreesboro, March 5, 1863.

Corp. Alex. Hurd, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 1, 1862; Wagoner; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Corp. Elijah Wilcox, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 11, 1862; died at Murfreesboro, Feb. 20, 1863. 17

Corp. Chas. L. Knight, Allegan; enlisted July 26, 1862; sergeant; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Corp. Alvah C. Fisk, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 2, 1862; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Farrier Wm. Pulcipher, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 4, 1862; died at Bowling Green, Ky.

Farrier Jesse S. Penfield, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 4, 1862; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Saddler Wilts H. Williams, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 7, 1862; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Teamster Jonathan Brewer, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 4, 1862; transferred to Inv. Corps, Aug. 1, 1863.

Wagoner Jos. Hofmaster, Allegan; enlisted July 25, 1862; quartermaster-sergeant; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Allen Ash, mustered out July 1, 1865'

Jacob I. Bailey, mustered out July 1, 1865.

John Bentley, discharged by order, June 19, 1865.

Wm. H. Baker, discharged for disability, Oct. 19, 1863.

Bradley M. Bates, discharged for disability, June 5, 1863.

Henry C. Braman, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Feb. 15, 1864.

David Beck, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 1, 1863.

Miles Bidwell, died of disease at Allegan, Feb. 2, 1865.

Alonzo C. Burnham, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Andrew Bee, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Elijah Cummins, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Benj. K. Colt,* Sergeant, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Edward R. Crawford, died of disease in Michigan, Jan. 28, 1863.

David V. Davidson, died of disease at Murfreesboro, Dec. 1, 1862.

Herbert H. Davidson, died of disease at Lebanon, Ky., March 5, 1863.

John C. Everts, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 5, 1863.

Henry C. Edgerton, discharged by order, May, 1865.

Andrew T. Foote, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 10, 1863.

Alexander Fry, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Feb. 15, 1864.

Leander J. Fields, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 12, 1862.

Jas. M. Flowers, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Chas. H. Gurney, discharged Dec. 10, 1862.

Lewis C. Goodrich, discharged for disability, March 11, 1863.

Martin J. Guyot, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 24, 1862.

Abner B. Hughes, died of disease at New Albany, Ind., June 13, 1863.

Edwin C. Hughes, died in action at Sumumerville, Ala., April 2, 1862.

David H. Hall, discharged for disability, Feb. 28, 1863.

Jas. Holdsworth, discharged by order, July 25, 1865.

John Harrington, mustered out July 1, 1865.

David H. Haines, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Hiram B. Hudson, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Otis L. HIalton, mustered out July 1, 1865.

John Keyser, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Jacob Keyser, died of disease at Lebanon, Ky., Feb. 14, 1863.

Walton Kibbey, died of disease at Louisville, Ky., Jan. 7, 1863.

Gordon N. Kenyon, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Edgar Lindsley, mustered out July 1, 1865.

John W. Lindsley, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Edward Lane,* mustered out July 18, 1865.

John McLoughrey, died in action at Stone River, Dec. 29, 1862.

Chas. C. Marsh,* corp., mustered out July 1, 1865.

Alonzo Miller, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Win. Mann,* mustered out July 1, 1865.

E. L. G. Myers, discharged by order, July 27, 1865.

Albert Miller, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Sept. 30, 1863.

Geo. W. Moore, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 1, 1863.

Francis Merchant, died of disease.

Geo. F. Nichols, died of disease at Nashville, July 10, 1863.

Jos. Naregang, died of disease at Murfreesboro, April 27, 1863.

Geo. Noggle, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Win. M. Oliver, corp., mustered out July 1, 1865.

Peter Passenger, mustered out July 1, 1865.

David D. Parkhurst, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Charles Pettit, died of disease in Kentucky, Nov. 3, 1862.

Horatio N. Price, died of disease at Murfreesboro, March 5, 1863.

Edward W. Pardee, died of disease at Nashville.

Edward Reed, mustered out July 1, 1865.

William G. Rowe, mustered out July 1, 1865. J

oseph Richie, discharged for disability, Aug. 9, 1863.

Jonathan D. Squires, discharged for disability, Oct. 19, 1863.

Charles F. Smith, died of disease in Ohio, Feb. 1, 1863.

Edward F. Safford, died of disease at Nashville, June 15, 1863.

Leland H. Shaw, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 15, 1864.

Ferdinand Sebright, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Gilbert Stone, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Henry Smith, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Joseph Stewart, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Isaac C. Seely, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Charles F. Tubah, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Ira Tuttle, discharged by order, July 21, 1865.

Salem True, discharged for disability.

E. S. Finley, discharged for disability, July 18, 1863.

Frederick Woodham, mustered out July 1, 1865.

John Wilson, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Daniel Willis, mustered out July 1, 1865.

William West, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Sylvester Wedge, mustered out July 1, 1865.

BARRY COUNTY MEMBERS OF THE FOURTH CAVALRY.

Company A.

Levitt D. Faulkerson, mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

Company C.

Simon Cooper, mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

John D. Rockwood, died of disease.

Company D.

Watson S. Williams, mustered out. Aug. 15, 1865.

Company H.

Lucius Bates, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Milo D. Cooper, mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

Horace Freeman, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 4, 1863.

John W. Holmes, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Madison A. Hoose, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Ira Leach, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 25, 1862.

Newell Nichols, discharged for disability, Feb. 22, 1863.

Owen A. Nichols, discharged for disability, July 14, 1863.

J. P. Reynolds, transferred to Yet. Res. Corps, Sept. 30, 1864; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Chester Savacool, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, April 10, 1864; mustered out July 1, 1865.

Company I.

Hiram Lamb, discharged Feb. 8, 1865.

Company K.

Byron R. Purdy, discharged by order, May 19, 1865.

Herman C. Purdy, discharged by order, May 19, 1865.

Company L.

Ira D. Brooks, mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

Benjamin F. Carpenter,* mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

Albert D. Carpenter, mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

Rooney G. Flowers, mustered out Aug. 15, 1865.

Company M.

Samuel H. Hubbard, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Company I, of the Fifth, from Allegan County-The Regiment assigned to the Michigan Brigade in the Spring of 1863-Battles in the Summer of 1863-Casualties-Winter-Quarters in 1863-64-Kilpatrick's Raid to Richmond-Col. Dahlgren's Expedition-Back to North Virginia-Reorganization of Sheridan's Command-Battle of the Wilderness-Sheridan's Raid to Richmond-The Dash into Beaver Dam-Battle with Stuart at Yellow Tavern-Stuart routed and slain-Before Richmond-Battle on the Chickahominy-Especial Gallantry of the Michigan Brigade-Return to the Army of the Potomac-Fight at Hawes' Shop-Old Church Tavern and Cold Harbor-Battle of Trevillian Station-Brilliant Victory-Fight at Louisa Court-House-In the Shenandoah Valley, Middletown, Front Royal, etc.-Victories at Opequan and Winchester-Casualties during the Year-Winter-Quarters-Sheridan's Great Raid to the Army of the Potomac-Dealing the Death-Blow to Rebellion-Ordered West-Men with Two Years to serve transferred-Regiment mustered out-Allegan County Members-Barry County Members -The Allegan and Barry Representation in the Sixth Cavalry-Its Battles and Casualties in 1863-Kilpatrick's Richmond Raid-The Wilderness-Beaver Dam, Meadow Bridge, and Ilawes' Shop-Trevillian Station-The Shenandoah Campaign-The Great Ride to Richmond-Closing Scenes-Ordered to the Rocky MountainsPowder River Expedition-A Guard "corralled"-The Regiment mustered out-Barry County Soldiers-Allegan County SoldiersFormation and Departure of the Sixth Cavalry-Assigned to the Michigan Brigade-Its Battles in 1863 —Its Battles in 1864-The Brilliant Close in 1865 —Its Frontier Service-The Muster out-The Barry County Members-The Allegan County Members.

FIFTH CAVALRY. COMPANY I, of this regiment, was wholly an Allegan County organization.

It was recruited by ex-Congressman, This celebrated body was composed of the First, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Cavalry.

It was organized in the fore-part of 1863^ and I William B. Williams, of Allegan, in the summer of 1862, and under his command proceeded to Detroit, Michigan, the regimental rendezvous, in August of the same year.

The regiment was first commanded by Col. J. T. Copeland, and was mustered into the United States service Aug. 30, 1862.

It was subjected to a long delay in procuring arms and equipments; a spirit of discontent prevailed in consequence, and numerous desertions occurred.

The regiment finally left the State for Washington on the 4th of December, 1862, only partly armed, but otherwise fully equipped and well mounted.

Down to that date it had carried on its rolls the names of one thousand three hundred and five officers and enlisted men.

Upon its arrival at the seat of war it was assigned to the Second Brigade, Third Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, otherwise known as the Michigan Cavalry brigade. (See note at beginning of chapter.)

It was engaged with the enemy at Hanover, Va., June 30, 1863; at Hunterstown, Pa., July 2d; Gettysburg, Pa., July 3d, where it was hotly engaged, charging the enemy repeatedly and losing heavily.

It was also in conflicts of more or less importance at Monterey, Md., July 4th; Cavalryetown, Md., July 5th; Smithtown, Boonsboro', Hagerstown, and Williamsport, Md., July 6th; Hagerstown and Williamsport, Md., July 10th; Falling Waters, Md., July 14th; Snicker's Gap, Va., July 19th; Kelly's Ford, Va., September 13th; Culpeper Court-House, Va., September 14th; Raccoon Ford, Va., September 16th; White's Ford, September 21st; Jack's Shop, Va., September 26th; James City, Va., October 12th; Brandy Station, Va., October 13th; Buckland's Mills, Va., October 19th; Stevensburg, Va., November 19th; and Morton's Ford, Va., Nov. 26, 1863.

Sixty-four men were killed and wounded during the year 1863, besides one hundred and twenty-one reported missing in action, many of whom were killed.

Other reports of alterations and casualties show that from the time the regiment was organized until the close of 1863 forty men died of disease, sixty-eight were discharged for disability, twenty-one by sentence of general court-martial, fifteen by order, two for promotion, one hundred and seventy-seven deserted, twenty officers resigned, one officer was dismissed, and the total number of recruits received was thirteen.

During the winter of 1863-6-1 the Fifth had its quarters at Stevensburg, Va., and was employed mostly on picket duty along the Rapidan.

In the latter part of February, 1864, it took part in the raid made by the Cavalry under Kilpatrick to the outer defenses of Richmond.

The main body of the regiment T. continued in service as a brigade until the close of the war; being commanded successively by Gens. Kilpatrick and Custer, and gaining, whether rightly or wrongly, the highest reputation of any Cavalry brigade in the service.

As three of the regiments of which the brigade was composed follow each other consecutively, and as all of them contained a considerable representation from Allegan and Barry Counties, we have grouped them together under the general title given above.

As there are numerous matters, however, which concern the regiments separately, we have furnished separate sketches of these bodies; giving the fullest description of the operations of the brigade in the history of the Fifth Regiment, which had the largest representation from these counties.

The fifth crossed the Rapidan, marched thence, via Spottsylvania and Beaver Dan Station to Hungary Station, and moved down the Brook turnpike to within five miles of the city of Richmond.

Being attacked on the 2d of March by a superior force of the enemy, the Union Cavalry was compelled to fall back on Gen. Butler's forces, stationed at New Kent Court-House.

A detachment of the regiment had also accompanied the forces commanded by the gallant Col. Ulric Dahlgren.

They moved down the James River to within five miles of the rebel capital.

The detachment of the Fifth, being in front, charged the enemy's works and captured his first line of fortifications.

Following up its advantage, Dahlgren's command pushed back the enemy from one line to another, until a point was reached within two miles of the city, when it was found impossible to advance farther with so small a force.

Meanwhile the rebels were gathering from all points, and in the endeavor to extricate itself from its perilous position the detachment of the Fifth became separated in the night, which was rainy and very dark, from the main portion of Dahlgren's command.

On the following day this detachment cut its way through a strong rebel force posted at Old Church, and succeeded in rejoining the regiment near White House Landing.

At Yorktown, Va., on the 11th of March, the regiment embarked on board transports for Alexandria, whence it marched to Stevensburg, arriving there on the 18th of April, 1864.

Here a reorganization of the Cavalry forces, under Gen. Sheridan's command, took place, and the Michigan Cavalry Brigade was thenceforth known as the First Brigade of the First Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac.

On the 5th of May the brigade, commanded by the fiery Custer, again crossed the Rapidan, and soon became engaged in the great battle of the Wilderness; fighting mounted, the first three days, against the forces led by the renowned rebel Cavalry leader, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart.

On the 9th of May the Cavalry corps set out, under Gen. Sheridan, on his great raid toward Richmond.

Three divisions, numbering full twelve thousand men, turned their horses' heads to the southward; the blue-coated column, as it marched by fours, extending eleven miles along the road, from front to rear.

On the route they overtook a large body of Union soldiers, who had been taken prisoners at Spottsylvania, released them, and captured the rebel guard.

Toward evening, the same day, the Michigan brigade, followed closely by the rest of the column, dashed into the rebel depot at Beaver Dam Station, scattering, almost in an instant, the force stationed for its defense.

All night long the men were busy destroying the immense amount of rebel supplies accumulated at Beaver Dam, worth millions of dollars, consisting of three long railroad trains, with locomotives, stores of goods of various kinds, and one hundred loaded army-wagons, the flames of which rose in lurid columns through the darkness amid the cheers of the exultant soldiers.

At daybreak the next morning the command moved forward, and after tearing up the railroad-track at Negro Foot Station it reached “Yellow Tavern," ten miles from Richmond, on the 11th of May.

There Gen. Stuart had assembled a large force of rebel Cavalry and a severe battle ensued.

The Fifth Cavalry fought dismounted, and charged' the enemy's position under a heavy fire; routing him after a most stubborn resistance.

The rebels lost heavily in this engagement, including their commanding officer, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, who was mortally wounded by a private of this regiment.

Having brushed aside all the forces opposed to it, the Union column pursued its way “on to Richmond" unmolested.

The next day the command arrived within a mile and a half of Richmond, but found fortifications in front on which Cavalry could make no impression.

Gen. Sheridan then turned his course toward the Chickahominy at Meadow Bridge.

The rebels had destroyed the bridge, and a large force of them disputed his further progress.

The approaches to the stream led through a swamp, along which not more than four men could ride abreast, and a well posted battery on the opposite side cut down the head of the Union column, completely checking its advance.

The leading brigade vainly endeavored to force a passage.

The next one likewise failed. Gen. Sheridan then sent for Custer and his Michigan brigade, which at once hastened to the front.

There the youthful general dismounted the Fifth and Sixth Michigan, and sent them forward into the swamp as flanking-parties, while with drawn sabres the First and Seventh Michigan breathlessly awaited the order to charge.

The dismounted men drove the enemy from their first position, advanced through water waist-deep to the railroad-bridge, crossed it on the ties, and then plied their Spencer rifles on the rebel cannoniers with such effect that the latter were obliged to turn their guns on these assailants to prevent being entirely enfiladed.

The moment they did so Custer gave the order to “Charge," and the two mounted regiments, with brandished sabres and ringing cheers, dashed forward at the top of their horses' speed.

The rebels had barely time to limber their guns and retreat; leaving the road again open for the advance of the whole corps.

The command then proceeded, via Malvern Hill, Hanover Court-House, White House, Ayelitt's and Concord Church, to Chesterfield Station, where it joined the main Army of the Potomac.

On the 28th of May the regiment was hotly engaged near Hawes' Shop, where it aided in driving the enemy from their position after a desperate hand-to-hand fight.

The loss of the regiment in this action was very severe.

Moving to Old Church Tavern on the 30th, it was engaged with its brigade in the routing of Young's rebel Cavalry.

On the 31st of May and 1st of June it was engaged, together with other Cavalry regiments, at Cold Harbor, where it fought dismounted in advance of the infantry, and, although losing heavily, succeeded in capturing many prisoners.

The Michigan brigade soon after set out under Gen. Sheridan to join Gen. Hunter, who was moving from the Shenandoah Valley to Lynchburg.

On the 11th of June the command met at Trevillian Station a large force of the enemy, both infantry and Cavalry.

During that day and the next there ensued one of the severest Cavalry fights of the war, the Union Cavalry mostly fighting dismounted.

The Michigan brigade did most of the fighting the first day, and lost heavily.

The brigade battery was three times captured by the enemy, and as many times recaptured by the determined efforts of the Michigan men.

The rebels were finally driven from the field and pursued several miles; six hundred prisoners, fifteen hundred horses, one stand of colors, six caissons, forty ambulances, and fifty wagons being captured by the victorious Unionists.

Moving subsequently in the direction of Louisa Courthouse, the regiment encountered a column of the enemy, but cut its way through with considerable loss in prisoners. Gen. Hunter failed to make the passage of the mountains.

Gen. Sheridan, in consequence, then marched his troops to White House Landing, and soon after joined the Army of the Potomac, south of Petersburg.

After serving on picket and scout duty in front of Richmond and Petersburg during the month of July, 1864, the Michigan brigade was taken on transports to Washington, D. C., early in August, and thence marched to the Shenandoah Valley.

Here it followed Custer in many a desperate charge, fully sustaining its old renown.

At Middletown the Fifth Cavalry was attacked by a strong force of the enemy, but repulsed them, capturing sixty-five prisoners.

Again, on the 19th of August, while a squadron of the regiment were scouting to the front, they were attacked by a greatly superior force of the enemy under the guerrilla leader Moseby, and being overpowered were driven into camp with a loss of sixteen men killed.

It was also engaged at:

 

  • Front Royal. August 16th;
  • Leetown, August 25th;
  • at Shepardstown, August 25th;
  • Smithfield, August 28th;
  • Berryville, September 3d;
  • Opequan Creek, September 19th, where the Michigan brigade utterly routed the enemy's Cavalry and broke their infantry lines, capturing two battle-flags and four hundred prisoners; Winchester, September 19th; Luray, September 24th;

 

Woodstock, October 9th; and Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864, where Custer's command charged the enemy's main line; driving it back in confusion and capturing a large number of prisoners.

During the year ending Nov. 1, 1864, the regiment had seventy-six men killed, one hundred and seventeen wounded in action, fourteen missing in action, one hundred and ninety-four taken prisoners, two hundred and nine recruits joined the regiment, while but thirty-three men died of disease and but two desertions were reported.

The Michigan brigade went into winter-quarters near Winchester, Va., in December, 1864, and remained until the latter part of February, 1865.

On the 27th it broke camp, and with the Cavalry corps commanded by Gen. Sheridan started on a long and rapid march up the Shenandoah Valley, past Staunton, over the mountains, and down the James River to the Army of the Potomac.

The command met with but little opposition, dispersed all forces opposed to it, destroyed much property on the line of the Lynchburg and Gordonsville Railroad, locks, mills, and aqueducts on the James River Canal, and on the 19th of March joined the forces assembled to give the last blow to Lee's rebel army.

On the 30th and 31st days of March and 1st of April, 1865, the Michigan brigade was warmly engaged at Five Forks.

During these three days of battle it was in the advance, and on the extreme left of the Union armies, fighting dismounted,-and finally succeeded, with the rest of Sheridan's corps, in capturing the enemy's line of defense, and several thousand prisoners.

From this time until the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, April 9, 1865, it was constantly engaged with the enemy, and, being in the advance, the flag of truce to negotiate the surrender was sent through its lines.

After the surrender of Lee this regiment moved with the Cavalry corps to Petersburg, Va.

Soon afterward it made an incursion, with other forces, into North Carolina; thence it marched to Washington, D. C., participated in the review of the Army of the Potomac, May 23, 1865, and immediately thereafter, with the Michigan Cavalry Brigade, was ordered to the Western frontier.

The Fifth was sent by rail and steamboat to Fort Leavenworth, Kan., where the men having two years or more to serve were transferred to the First and Seventh Michigan Cavalry Regiments.

On the 22d of June the regiment, as an organization, was mustered out of service.

It arrived in Detroit, Michigan, July 1, 1865, and was there paid off and disbanded.

ALLEGAN COUNTY MEMBERS.

Company I.

Captain Win. B. Williams, Allegan; com. Sept. 3, 1862; resigned June 11, 1863.

Captain Geo. N. Dutcher, Saugatuck; com. June 13, 1863; 1st Lieutenant, Aug. 14, 1862; discharged for disability, Nov. 2, 1863.

1st Lieutenant Geo. W. Lonsbury, Allegan; com. July 15, 1864: 2d Lieutenant, Sept. 1, 1863 (previously sergeant); promoted to Captain Co. M, Nov. 10, 1864; bvt. Major, March 13, 1865, "for gallant and meritorious services during the war;" mustered out June 22, 1865.

2d Lieutenant Geo. N. Gardner, Saugatuck; enlisted April 14, 1865; mustered out June 22, 1865.

Q.-M. Sergeant L. L. Crosby, Saugatuck; enlisted Aug. 12, 1862; transferred to Signal Corps, April, 1864.

Com. Sergeant Hannibal Hart, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 18, 1862; discharged for wounds, June 14, 1864.

Sergeant Wm. C. Weeks, Allegan; enlisted July 22, 1862; mustered out June 23, 1865.

Sergeant Hiram R. Ellis, Saugatuck; enlisted Aug. 19, 1862; discharged for promotion, Aug. 29, 1864.

Sergeant Geo. W. Earl, Gun Plains; enlisted Aug. 21, 1862; mustered out June 23, 1865.

Sergeant Martin Baldwin, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 21, 1862; mustered out June 23, 1865.

Sergeant Wm. A. Piper, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 15, 1862; discharged for disability, Dec. 12, 1864.

Sergeant Wm. White, Saugatuck; enlisted Aug. 15, 1862; promoted to 2d Lieutenant Co. L, May 2, 1865.

Sergeant Geo. H. Smith, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 22, 1862; discharged by order, June 13, 1865.

Sergeant Irving Batchelor, Gun Plains; enlisted Aug. 21, 1862; mustered out June 23, 1865.

Corp. David P. Taylor, Ganges; enlisted Aug. 14, 1862; died of accidental wounds, March 27, 1863.

Corp. Austin A. Andrews, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 21, 1862; mustered out June 23, 1865.

Corp. Herman Garvelink, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 15, 1862; killed in action at Hawes' Shop, May 28, 1864.

Corp. Louis Hirner, Saugatuck; enlisted Aug. 15, 1862; killed in action at Yellow Tavern, May 11, 1864.

Farrier Mortimer Andrews, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 21, 1862; discharged by order, June 13, 1865.

Farrier Geo. Masson, Gun Plain; enlisted Aug. 22, 1862; transferred to Inv. Corps, Sept. 1, 1863.

Saddler Jacob E. Miner, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 22, 1862; absent sick at City Point, Va.

Teamster John Cook, Allegan; enlisted Aug. 21, 1862; discharged for disability, Sept. 16, 1863.

Wagoner Dewitt C. Sanford, Gun Plain; enlisted Aug. 22, 1862; discharged for disability, Feb. 13, 1863.

Samuel Atkins, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Oriss Buchanan, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Caleb Bennett, discharged by order, July 12, 1865.

E. J. Burlingame, missing in action at Richmond, March 1, 1864.

Hendrick Cook, missing in action at Trevillian Station, June 11, 1864.

George Canouse, missing in action at Trevillian Station, June 11, 1864.

Elliott Chase, died of disease at Detroit, Oct. 19, 1862.

Lawrence L. Crosby, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, April, 1861.

James Collins, died in Andersonville prison-pen, July 9, 1864.

David Cummings, died a prisoner of war, of disease, Aug. 15, 1864.

Daniel C. Collier, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Samuel Clark, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Gabriel Cole, (Medal of Honor) mustered out June 23, 1865.

Robert Dyer, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Russell Dyer, mustered out June 2:3, 1865.

Seth Dyer, discharged by order, July 17, 1865.

James Dyer, missing in action at Trevillian Station, June 11, 1864.

George Drury, missing in action at Trevillian Station, June 11, 1864.

William Drury, missing in action, Oct. 1(, 1864.

Benjamin S. Dalrymple, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Abner Emmons, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Orliter P. Eaton, discharged by order, May 19, 1865.

Lafayette Fox, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Cornelius Gavin, discharged by order, July 20, 1865.

Vernon Groucher, mustered out June 23, 1865.

William Goodman, died of disease, a prisoner of war, July 24, 1864.

George H. Hicks, died in action at Smithfield, Va., Aug. 29, 1864.

Hannibal Hart, discharged by order, Jan. 14, 1864.

George Hodgetts, transferred to 7th Michigan Cavalry.

John Will, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Morgan B. Hawks, mustered out June 23, 1865.

James Kitchen, discharged at end of service, Aug. 20, 1865.

Morgan D. Lane, transferred to Signal Corps, April 23, 1864,

William McWilliams, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, March 15, 1864.

H. W. Mann, (lied in action at Shepardstown, Va., Aug. 25, 1864.

Gottlieb Miller, missing in action at Richmond, Va., March 1, 1864.

Charles E. Moses, died of disease, a prisoner of war, Sept. 29, 1865.

John E. Murphy, mustered out June 23, 1865.

George E. Munn, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Orlando C. Masson, mustered out June 2:3, 1865.

Franklin Miller, mustered out June 23, 1865.

William Neuhof, discharged by order, May 3, 1865.

M. A. Powell, discharged by order, Feb. 2, 1865.

George Pullman, died of disease, a prisoner of war, April 12, 1864.

Giles A. Piper, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Albert Rynick, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Raphael Ross, trans to Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 15, 1861.

Caspar Robb, discharged by order, July 11, 1865.

Jacob Rinehart, discharged by order, July 12, 1865.

Joseph Slagel, discharged by order, Dec. 24, 1863.

Samuel Shaver, mustered out June 23, 1865.

David H. Seaman, mustered out June 2:3, 1865.

George Shuport, mustered out June 23, 1865.

George Shepard, missing in action at Richmond, Va., March 1, 1864.

Marcus C. Thompson, Died of disease, a prisoner of war, Sept. 4, 1864.

George W. Thompson, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Henry Warner, discharged for wounds.

Homer Watson, mustered out June 23, 1865.

Henry Zoneman, mustered out June 23, 1865.

BARRY COUNTY.

William H. Cook, Co. L, of this regiment, was from Barry County. He was last reported as missing in action at Trevillian Station, Va., June 11, 1864.

SIXTH CAVALRY.

Allegan County had but few members in the Sixth Cavalry, but Barry was represented in all its companies except I; Company K being almost exclusively from that county.

The regiment rendezvoused at Grand Rapids.

Its ranks were rapidly filled, and it was mustered into the United States service, under the command of Col. George Gray, on the 13th of October, 1862.

Mounted and equipped, but not armed, carrying on its rolls the names of one thousand two hundred and twenty-nine officers and men, it left the regimental rendezvous on the 10th of December following, and proceeded to the seat of war in Virginia.

It was soon assigned to the Second Brigade of the Third Division of the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac (the Michigan Cavalry Brigade), of which a somewhat extended notice has been given in the sketch of the preceding regiment, to which the reader is referred for details.

Before the beginning of its first campaign Company K, by reason of discharges and resignations, had lost all its original commissioned officers except Lieutenant Pendill.

The regiment fought at Hanover, Pa., June 30, 1863; at Hunterstown and Gettysburg, Pa., and Monterey, Cavalryetown, Smithtown, Boonsboro', Hagerstown, Williamsport, 7 and Falling Waters, Md., in July of the same year; at Snicker's Gap, Va., July 19, 1863; at Kelly's Ford, Culpeper Court-House, Raccoon Ford, White's Ford, and Jack's Shop, Va., in September, 1863; at James City, Brandy Station, and Buckland's Mills, Va., in October, 1863; and at Stevensburg and Morton's Ford, Va., in November of the same year.

At Gettysburg and Falling Waters it particularly distinguished itself.

Its principal casualties from the time it entered the service until Nov. 1, 1863, were reported as thirty-six killed in action, seventy-five missing in action, and forty-five who died of disease.

During the winter of 1863-64 it was quartered at Stevensburg, Va.

In the latter part of February it started for Richmond, forming part of Gen. Kilpatrick's raiding force.

It participated in all the hard riding, skirmishing, etc., attendant upon that unsuccessful expedition, and, with others of the command, succeeded in joining the Union forces at New Kent Court-House.

Thence it moved down the Peninsula, proceeded on transports to Alexandria, and then marched to its former camp at Stevensburg.

On the 18th of April the Michigan brigade was transferred to the First Cavalry Division, and thereafter until the close of the war was known as the First Brigade of the First Division Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac.

Companies I and M, which had been operating in the Shenandoah Valley during the year 1863, rejoined the regiment on the 3d of May, 1864, and on the 6th of that month the Michigan brigade was in the midst of the terrible battles going on in the Wilderness.

As victors, it emerged into the open country on the 8th of May, and on the morning of the 9th started with Sheridan's corps on a raid to the rear of the rebel armies, the brigade leading this splendid body of twelve thousand veteran Cavalrymen.

The Sixth assisted in destroying the immense rebel depot of supplies at Beaver Dam Station, fought in the thickest of the battle at Yellow Tavern, and gained imperishable honor at the crossing of the Chickahominy at Meadow Bridge.*

Again, at Hawes' Shop, on the 28th of May, 1864, the regiment took part in a decisive charge on the enemy's lines.

After a severe conflict the rebels were forced to retire, leaving their dead and wounded on the field.

The Sixth lost heavily in this engagement.

Of its members present, one-fourth were either killed or wounded in less than ten minutes.

Engaging in the raid of Sheridan's forces towards Gordonsville, the regiment, on the 11th of June, participated in the battle of Trevillian Station, charging the enemy repeatedly, and capturing many prisoners, most of whom, however, were recaptured.

From the time it crossed the Rapidan, on the 5th of May, until it passed the James, on the 28th of June, the regiment lost twenty-nine men killed, sixty wounded, and sixty-four missing.

Early in August the Michigan brigade, with others of Sheridan's command, was transferred to the Shenandoah Valley, where it took an active part in all the skirmishes, battles, marches, and counter-marches that occurred during this part of the Shenandoah campaign.

The actions in which the Sixth participated in the valley may be summarily catalogued as those of Front Royal, Leetown, Smithfield, Opequan Creek, Winchester, Luray, Port Republic, Mount Crawford, Fisher's Hill, Woodstock, and Cedar -Creek.

In December, 1864, it went into winter quarters near Winchester.

Its total list of killed to November 1st amounted to fifty-five, while forty-four of its members had died of disease.

During the last days of February, 1865, the regiment began its final Virginia campaign.

After a long and eventful march under Sheridan, during which it helped to defeat the rebel Gen. Rosser at Louisa Court-House, to break up the Lynchburg and Gordonsville Railroad, and to destroy the locks, aqueducts, and mills on the James River Canal, it reached White House Landing on the 19th of March, and immediately took part in the succession of brilliant triumphs which ended at Appomattox Court-House on the 9th of April, 1865.

After the surrender, the rebel Gen. Pickett, who was taken prisoner in one of these engagements, spoke of a charge made by this regiment which he witnessed as being the “bravest he had ever seen."

After participating in the grand review held at Washington, D. C., May 23, 1865, the Michigan brigade was ordered, vid the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the Ohio, Mississippi, and Missouri Rivers, to Fort Leavenworth, Kan.

At that point the Sixth received orders to cross the Plains.

These orders produced much dissatisfaction among its members, as they, with all other volunteers, had supposed that with the collapse of the Rebellion their services would no longer be required.

Remembering, however, their noble record as a regiment, adhering firmly to the high degree of discipline and faithful observance of orders which had ever distinguished them, its members marched forward by way of Fort Kearney and Julesburg to Fort Laramie.

At the latter point the regiment was divided into detachments by order of Gen. Connor.

One was to form a part of the “left column, Powder River expedition," one was to remain at Fort Laramie, while another was to escort a train to the Black Hills.

The Powder River detachment, on reaching that stream, found that the Indians, of whom it had been sent in pursuit, had managed to escape.

The troops then built the fort since known as Fort Reno.

On this expedition Captain O. F. Cole, of Company G, lost his life; having needlessly ridden a long distance from the column, he was surprised by Indians and shot to death with arrows.

From Fort Reno a small detachment was sent out as a train-guard to Virginia City, Montana.

Meeting a large war party of Arapahoe Indians, the guard was "corralled" that is, surrounded and stopped-by them for twelve days.

'Gen. Connor was finally apprised of their condition, when reinforcements were sent to their relief.

Sergeant Hall, of Company L, and Private Evans, of Company F, were the brave men who succeeded in conveying the intelligence to Gen. Connor.

They traversed a distance of fifty miles through a wild and to them unknown country, swarming with hostile savages, and thereby saved the detachment.

On the 17th of September, in pursuance of orders issued by Major-Gen. Dodge, the men of the Sixth whose term of service did not expire before Feb. 1, 1866, were consolidated with the First Michigan Cavalry, and the rest of the regiment was ordered to Fort Leavenworth, Kan.

It was there mustered out of service Nov. 24, 1865, and on the 30th of the same month it arrived at Jackson, Michigan, where its members received final pay and discharge-papers.

BARRY COUNTY SOLDIERS.

Field and Staff.

Q.-M. W. H. Jewell, Assyria; com. Dec. 11, 1864; mustered out Nov. 7, 1865. (See Co. K.)

Non-Commissioned Staff.

Hosp. Steward Benj. R. Rose, Carlton; enlisted Nov. 1, 1863; discharged by order from Co. K, May 3, 1865.

Company A.

Andrew L. Barnum, died in action at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864.

Company B.

Peter Dunham, discharged by order, Dec. 4, 1865.

Myndert Yemans, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Company C.

Thomas Cowell, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry., Nov. 17, 1864.

Andrew J. Fisher, discharged at end of service, Feb. 17, 1866.

Simson D. Inman, mustered out Feb. 17, 1866.

George M. Jenkins, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry., Nov. 17, 1864.

Company D.

John P. Mallin, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry., Nov. 17, 1865.

Andrew Rogers, mustered out March 31, 1866.

Company E.

Wilson Perkins, died in action at Beaver Pond Mills, Va., April 4, 1865.

Joseph Snith, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry., Nov. 17, 1865.

Company F.

Robert McNee, transferred to Yet. Res. Corps, July 1, 1863.

Asa Smith, mustered out.

Company G.

Daniel Bowerman, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry., Nov. 17, 1865.

Orrin Clark, mustered out Feb. 10, 1866.

George W. Cline, mustered out Feb. 15, 1866.

James V. Judd, discharged Oct. 1, 1863.

Company H.

Hiram F. Lawrence, mustered out Feb. 17, 1866.

Thomas Mayo, died of disease at Andersonville prison, Ga., Oct. 9, 1864.

Oliver S. Reed, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry.

Company K.

1st Lieutenant Peter Cramer, Woodland; com. Aug. 26, 1862; res. Feb. 18, 1863. 2d Lieutenant

Lewis H. Jordon, Irving; com. Sept. 25, 1862; discharged March 6, 1863. 2d Lieutenant

Cortez P. Pendill, Prairieville; com. March 16, 1863; enlisted as 1st Sergeant, Aug. 26, 1862; res. for disability, Sept. 16, 1S64.

Q.-M. Sergeant Chas. W. Taylor, Maple Grove; enlisted Aug. 26, 1862; discharged.

Com. Sergeant H. C. Hendershott, Irving; enlisted Oct. 11, 1862; transferred to Inv. Corps, Jan. 15, 1864.

Sergeant Wm. H. Jewell, Assyria; enlisted Sept. 2, 1862; promoted to regimental quartermaster.

Sergeant Lorenzo D. Cobb, Yankee Springs; enlisted Sept. 8, 1862; promoted to 2d Lieutenant

Company  L.

Sergeant Parley H. Rice, Hope; enlisted Sept. 7, 1862; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps; mustered out July 5, 1865.

Sergeant John C. Dillon, Maple Grove; enlisted Aug. 29, 1862; discharged for disability, Jan. 28, 1865.

Sergeant Selden E. Norton, Castleton; enlisted Aug. 26, 1862; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Corp. Jas. K. Francisco, Prairieville; enlisted Sept. 2, 1862; died of wounds, Sept. 26, 1864.

Corp. Mathew Baird, Hope; enlisted Aug. 30, 1862; mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Corp. John L. Williams, Yankee Springs; enlisted Sept. 20, 1862; mustered out July 7, 1865.

Corp. Clifton G. Barnum, Carlton; enlisted Aug. 27, 1862; died of disease at Fairfax, Va., April 18, 1863.

Corp. Henry C. Rice, Hope; enlisted Sept. 7, 1862; transferred to Inv. Corps, Jan. 15, 1864.

Corp. Presley W. Haskinson, Yankee Springs; enlisted Sept. 20, 1862; mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Corp. Milo 0. West, Hope; enlisted Aug. 30, 1862; died of disease, Aug. 24, 1864.

Musician John J. Cobb, Yankee Springs; enlisted Sept. 8, 1862; mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Musician Myron Paul, Thornapple; enlisted Sept. 8, 1862; mustered out July 25, 1865.

Farrier Aaron J. Walker, Irving; enlisted Oct. 10, 1862; transferred to Inv. Corps, Jan. 15, 1864.

Farrier Jeremiah Baribaugh, Castleton; enlisted Oct. 10, 1862; mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Teamster Anson Cary, Thornapple; enlisted Aug. 18, 1862; discharged for disability, Sept. 26, 186:3.

Teamster Samuel Barton, Irving; enlisted Aug. 30, 1862; mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Wagoner David R. Trego, Irving; enlisted Oct. 10, 1862; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 3, 1864.

Jacob Alverson, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Clifren Bowerman, died of disease at Washington, D. C.

W. H. Brown, died of disease at Washington, D. C.

David Brown, died of disease, Jan. 8, 1864.

Munson Buck, missing in action at Hanover, Pa., June 30, 1863.

John Beach, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Amos Beach, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Stephen P. Barnum, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

William E. Bolton, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

George H. Brownell, died of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa.

Frederick Bergman, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, April 10, 1864.

Josiah L. Campbell, discharged for disability, Jan. 2, 1863.

Myron Chamberlain, discharged for disability, Sept. 6, 1863.

Norman E. Clark, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry.

Emerson Cartwright, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Austin W. Clark, mustered out Nov. 19, 1865.

Marquis A. Dowd, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

John A. Dennis, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

George W. Dart, discharged for disability, Feb. 11, 1863.

Edward Dacons, died of disease, Jan. 13, 1865.

Amos J. Eggleston, discharged for disability, Sept. 30, 1863.

Joseph Fishburn, died of disease at his home, Nov. 11, 1864.

William Gordon, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Feb. 15, 1864.

Adam Hart, died of disease at Washington, D. C.

Benjamin lHeath, discharged for disability.

Frederick Hart, discharged for disability, May 15, 1865.

James H. Hunt, mustered out June 12, 1865.

John Irwin, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Van Rensselaer Jones, discharged for disability, July 21, 1863.

Lyman C. Jayquays,* mustered out June 30, 1866.

Ira Kelsey, died at Newby's Cross-Roads, Va., July 24, 1863.

Dewitt C. Kenyon, mustered out June 29, 1865.

Jeremiah Killmer, mustered out Nov 24, 1865.

Jefferson Kelley, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Jacob Kabler, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Franklin R. Lewis, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Samuel Murdock, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Hiram McCartney, died of disease at Andersonville prison, Ga., March 29, 1864.

Justin W. Miles, mustered out March 31, 1866.

Edwin Meads, discharged for wounds, April 6, 1864.

John A. Miller, discharged for wounds, Oct. 5, 1864.

Archibald Murdock, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Oct.12, 1865.

Mark Norris, mustered out March 31, 1866.

Mason Norton, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Levi Presley, mustered out March 26, 1866.

George M. Payne, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Samuel Presley, discharged for disability.

Jonathan Smith, died at Newby's Cross-Roads, Va., July 24, 1863.

Albert H. Sidman, discharged for disability.

Justice Smith, reported missing in action, but returned.

Stephen A. Stanley, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry.

Robert W. Slhriner, mustered out June 20, 1865.

Russell K. Stanton, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Justin A. Smith, mustered out July 10, 1865.

Eber A. Stanley, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Elisha Skillman, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

James A. Vandechoten, mustered out June 13, 1865.

L. F. Vester, died of disease at Baltimore, Md., Sept. 22, 1864.

David Way, Jr., died of disease.

Orville Wheeler, died of disease in Michigan, Nov. 28, 1864.

Joel 0. Wheeler, discharged for disability, Jan. 2, 1863.

Lycurgus J. Wheeler, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 3, 1864.

William R. Wheeler, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Oscar White, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Henry A. Ward, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Company L.

2d Lieutenant Lorenzo D. Cobb, Yankee Springs; com. Dec. 10, 1864; mustered out Nov. 21, 1865.

Martin Babcock, mustered out Aug. 12, 1865.

Jeremiah Crandall, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Alfred Fraine, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry.; mustered out March 25, 1866.

Charles Furness, mustered out July 6, 1865.

Calvin C. Norton, transferred to 1st Michigan Cay., Nov. 17, 1865.

Charles Terry, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry.

Company M.

Sergeant Silas M. Smith, Irving; enlisted Sept. 7, 1862; must out Nov. 24, 1865.

J. Q. A. Briggs, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry... ' Or Jaques.

I. Johnson N. Bowen, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Deloss D. Bassett, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Alfred Flanders, mustered out June 30, 1866.

Daniel Hewitt, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

John Klock, died of disease at tarper's Ferry, Va., Aug. 1, 1864.

William C. Kelly, died of disease at Andersonville prison, Ga., Sept. 15, 1864.

Robert McNee, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, July 1, 1863.

MEMBERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Field and Staff.

1st. Lieutenant and Adj. Elliott M. Norton, Wayland; com. Jan. 4, 1865; 2d Lieutenant Co. H, Jan. 1, 1864; transferred to Vet. Cavalry. Nov. 17, 1865; mustered out March 10, 1866.

Company A.

Merritt C. Mosher, missing in action at Todd's Tavern, Va., May 6, 1864.

Company B.

Sergeant E. M. Norton. (See Field and Staff.)

Edwin E. Whitney, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Company I.

Peter J. Alden, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

John Madison, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Company K.

Versal P. Fales, must out June 2, 1865.

Justus German, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

Henry F. Haney, mustered out Oct. 24, 1865.

Origen Hamilton, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry.

Elisha Inman, supposed killed by guerrillas.

Wells T. Latourette, mustered out Nov. 24, 1865.

SEVENTH CAVALRY.

This regiment numbered among its members sixty officers and men from Barry County, and less than a dozen from the county of Allegan, these being scattered among all its companies, except G and L.

The rendezvous was at Grand Rapids, where the regiment was organized during the fall of 1862 and the ensuing winter.

Two battalions left Grand Rapids for the seat of war in Virginia, Feb. 20, 1863, and were joined by the third battalion in May following, Col. William D. Mann being in command of the regiment.

The Seventh was assigned to the Michigan Cavalry Brigade, so often mentioned already, and until the close of the war participated in all its glory and renown.

It took part in minor actions at Thoroughfare Gap, Va., May 21, 1863; at Greenwich, Va., May 30th, and at Hanover, Pa., on the 30th of June.

On the 3d of July at Gettysburg it was very hotly engaged, charging the enemy repeatedly, and having fifty-seven of its men killed and wounded, besides twelve missing and twelve taken prisoners.

It was also engaged at Smithtown, Md. July 6th; at Boonsboro', Md., July 6th and 8th; at Hagerstown, Md., July 6th and 10th; at Falling Waters, Md., July 14th; at Snicker's Gap, Va., July 19th; at Kelly's Ford, Va., September 13th; at Culpeper Court-House, Va., September 14th; at Raccoon Ford, Va., September 16th; Brandy Station, Va., October 13th, and others.

Ninety-two men were killed and wounded in action, forty-six were reported missing in action, many of whom were killed, and down to Nov. 1, 1863, the date of making that report, fifty of its numbers had died of disease.

During the winter of 1863-64 the Seventh was mostly employed on picket duty in front of the Army of the Potomac, but resumed more active service on the 28th of February, 1864, when it marched with its brigade on the "Kilpatrick raid."

Arriving before Richmond on the 31st of February, it was placed on picket the following night.

Here it was attacked by a superior force of the enemy, and, being unsupported, was driven back.

Forty-four men were reported missing, among whom was the commander of the regiment, Lieutenant-Col. A. C. Litchfield, The command soon marched to Yorktown, whence it proceeded by transports to Alexandria, Va.

Having crossed the Rapidan with the Army of the Potomac on the 5th of May, the regiment set out on the 9th in Gen. Sheridan's movement against the enemy's communications.

On the 11th it was in the battle of Yellow Tavern; charging the enemy's Cavalry and driving it from the field, and having eighteen of its own men killed and wounded.

The operations of the Michigan Cavalry Brigade on that raid have been mentioned in the sketch of the Fifth Cavalry, previously given, and the Seventh took its full share in them all.

After rejoining the army it attacked the rebel Cavalry on the 27th of May, charging and driving one of their brigades several miles, and capturing forty-one men.

The next day it was in a fight at Hawes' Shop, where fourteen of its men were killed and wounded.

It also took part in the attack on the enemy's works at Cold Harbor on the 30th of May, fighting dismounted in advance of the infantry.

With the rest of the Michigan brigade and other regiments, it then moved, under Gen. Sheridan, towards Gordonsville, and on the 11th and 12th of June had a hard Cavalry fight at Trevillian Station, losing twenty-nine killed and wounded during the conflict.

On the first day of the fight a small squad of the Seventh recaptured from a large force of the rebels a piece of artillery which had been taken from a Union battery.

The command then returned to the main army, and on the 31st of July the Michigan brigade set out for Washington and the Shenandoah Valley.

On the 16th of August the Seventh Cavalry was in the battle of Crooked Run, where it had twelve men killed and wounded, and where, according to the official report, "one battalion charged a brigade of rebel Cavalry, routing them and capturing nearly a hundred prisoners."

On the 25th of August it was engaged near Shepherdstown, with slight loss.

On the 29th, its division being attacked by infantry in force, it covered the retreat to Smithfield, having fourteen killed and wounded.

On the 19th of September the regiment was warmly engaged in the battle of Opequan Creek.

It charged across that stream, drove the enemy from the bank, advanced and aided in driving him at headlong speed through the town of Winchester.

Twenty-three officers and men were killed and wounded in the Seventh; among the mortally wounded being its commander, Lieutenant-Col. Melvin Brewer.

Five days later the regiment was in another combat at Luray, driving the enemy back in great confusion, and capturing sixty prisoners.

On the 9th of October the Seventh took part with its corps in routing the rebel Cavalry under Gen. Rosser.

Ten days later, at Cedar Creek, while the regiment was on picket, the enemy, by a sudden attack, broke through the line of the Union infantry and struck it in the rear.

It made good its retreat, however, without serious loss.

When Sheridan galloped up from Winchester and retrieved the fortunes of the day, the Seventh Michigan Cavalry took an active part in the conflict, and in the final charge which drove the foe in confusion from the field it captured about one hundred prisoners.

During the year ending Nov. 1, 1864, the regiment had had no less than one hundred and fifty-nine officers and men killed and wounded, a very heavy loss for a Cavalry regiment.

The Seventh remained in camp near Winchester most of the time until the 27th of February, 1865, when it moved up the Shenandoah Valley, with its corps, to take part in Gen. Sheridan's celebrated march to the James River.

On the 8th of March the regiment aided in routing a portion of Rosser's Cavalry near Louisa Court-House, and capturing the town.

After destroying a large part of the Lynchburg and Gordonsville Railroad, and the locks, aqueducts, and mills on the James River Canal, the command reached White House Landing on the 19th of March, and was soon, with, the Cavalry corps, established on the left of the Army of the Potomac.

The Seventh took an active part in the battle of Five Forks, and was engaged with the enemy almost till the moment of Lee's surrender at Appomattox.

After a short stay in North Carolina the Michigan brigade returned to Washington, and thence proceeded to Fort Leavenworth, whence it was ordered to cross the Plains and operate against the hostile Indians.

There was much bitterness felt by the men at this extension of their service to another field from what was originally intended.

Nevertheless, they crossed the Plains to the Rocky Mountains, and were employed until November in guarding the overland stage-route from the Indians.

About the 1st of November the regiment transferred two hundred and fifty men, whose term extended beyond March 1, 1866, to the First Michigan; the remainder of the regiment returning to Fort Leavenworth, and being there mustered out of the service.

It was paid off and disbanded at Jackson, Michigan, on the 25th of December, 1866.

BARRY COUNTY MEMBERS.

Field and Staff.

Surg. Wm. Upjohn, Hastings; com. Nov. 1, 1863; mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

1st Lieutenant and Com'y James W. Bentley, Hastings; com. Oct. 15, 1862; mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

Hosp. Steward George A. Smith, Hastings; appointed Nov. 14; 1862; discharged by order, May 3, 1865.

Company A.

Henry Allen, mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

Marshall Billinger, mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

James Barber, mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

Charles Cook, mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

Edgar A. Clark, died of disease at Little Blue, Neb., July 5, 1865.

Edward H. Harvey, discharged by order, Dec. 22, 1864.

Alexander McNeal, mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

Edgar Nye, mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

Company B.

Alfred Dyvis, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Company C.

James Thomas, mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

Company D.

James F. Saddler, mustered out July 14, 1865.

Company E.

James Dawson, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry. Nov. 17, 1865.

Charles E. Hyde, discharged from Vet. Res. Corps, Aug. 7, 1863.

Jacob D. Hendrick, discharged from Vet. Res. Corps, Aug. 2, 1866.

Company F.

Sergeant Harmon Smith, Prairieville; promoted 2d Lieutenant Dec. 12, 1865; mustered out as Sergeant Dec. 15, 1865.

James Blanchard, died of disease in Andersonville prison, Ga., Sept. 15, 1864.

Charles 11. Bergnman, mustered out March 10, 1866.

John L. Chandler, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Eugene Cooper, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry. Nov. 17, 1865.

R. Cone, died of disease at Jackson, Michigan, May 18, 1864.

Daniel Eldridge, mustered out March 10, 1866.

James Henry, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Isaac 0. Howe, died of disease at Andersonville prison, Ga., Nov. 17, 1864.

Charles J. Jenner, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry. Nov. 17, 1865.

Robert A. Kelly, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Thomas H. McLeod, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps.

Alexander F. McIntosh, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 15, 1864.

John M. Peck, died of disease.

Peleg T. Phelps, died of disease at York, Pa., Aug. 27, 1864.

O. F. Ralph, died in action at Falling Waters, Md., July 14, 1863.

Norman Ruggles, discharged for disability, Sept. 14, 1863.

Joseph F. Trenchard, discharged for disability, June 24, 1865.

Joy S. Terry, discharged for disability, Oct. 13, 1863.

Peter Wilbert, discharged for disability, Sept. 14, 1863.

George L. Wilcox, mustered out July 11, 1865.

Job J. Williams died of disease at Alexandria, Va., July 25, 1863.

Company H.

W. C. Bush, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Edwin Bissell, mustered out June 2, 1865.

Perry G. Fisher, mustered out March 10, 1866.

Byron Fisher, mustered out June 24, 1865.

Robinson Norwood, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Milton F. Nottingham, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry. Nov. 17, 1865.

Loski 0. Peck, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry. March 10, 1866.

William Shean, died of disease at Brandy Station, Va., March 10, 1864.

Irvin Teneyck, missing in action at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864.

Company I.

Robert Strong, discharged April 24, 1863.

Company K.

Q.M.-Sergeant Fitch M. Searles, Orangeville; enlisted Dec. 27, 1862; mustered out Jan. 26, 1865.

Corp. William W. Bitgood, Orangeville; discharged for disability, Aug. 3, 1863.

Blacksmith Jesse G. Sprague, Hastings; transferred to Inv. Corps, Nov. 1, 1863.

Jsmes Campbell, missing in action at Boonsboro', Md., July 8, 1863.

Oliver Chalker, mustered out March 6, 1866.

Frederick Hahn, mustered out March 6, 1866.

Edward Leslie, mustered out July 12, 1865.

Colburn Osgood, mustered out March 6, 1866.

Hugh Smith, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry., Nov. 17, 1865.

John L. Young, mustered out March 6, 1866.

Company M.

Erastus Havens, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, April 10, 1864.

MEN FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY, Michigan in the Seventh Cavalry.

D. Eldridge, discharged for disability, Nov. 6, 1863.

Company F.

Irving Jambs, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry.

Company H.

Samuel B. Delaney, mustered out March 20, 1866.

George R. McHenry, mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

Sidney R. Prentiss, died of disease at Baltimore, Sept. 24, 1864.

Company I.

William H. Kirshner, mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

Nelson J. Kendall, mustered out Dec. 15, 1865.

 

Company K.

Joseph Staley, transferred to 1st Michigan Cavalry.

Company M.

John Will, transferred to lbt Michigan Cavalry.

EIGHTH, TENTH, AND ELEVENTH CAVALRY, Etc.

Organization of the Eighth

Company F from Allegan County-Officers from the Two Counties-Service in Kentucky —Routing Morgan at Buffington's Island —Hard Marching-Services in East Tennessee-Back to Kentucky on Foot-Remounted-Joins Sherman at Kennesaw-Services in the Atlanta Campaign-Surrounded, but breaks out-Afterwards surprised and routed-Those who escaped sent to Nashville-Fighting Hood-The End-Officers and Soldiers from Allegan County —From Barry County-The Tenth Cavalry-On Duty in Kentucky and Tennessee-Engagement at Carter's Station-At Butt's Gap —The Summer of 1864 –Routing and Killing Morgan-Expedition to Saltville, Va.-Expedition into North Carolina-Hard Marching and Fighting at Henry Court-House-Victory at Salisbury, N. C. —Barry County Soldiers-

Allegan County Soldiers in the Eight Cavalry.

This regiment, the rendezvous of which was at Mount Clemens, was recruited during the fall of 1862 and the winter following, but did not take the field until May, 1863, when, with one thousand one hundred and seventeen officers and men, it proceeded to Kentucky.

Allegan and Barry Counties were well represented in the Eighth; the former county furnishing almost all of Company F, which was recruited by Captain (afterwards Col.) Elisha Mix, of Manlius.

Asst.-Surg. Samuel D. Toby, of Ganges; Adjt. Homer Manvel, of Saugatuck;

Second Lieutenant Miles Horn, of Otsego;

Captain John E. Babbitt, of Allegan County; and First Lieutenant Adrian L. Cook, of Hastings, were also conspicuous officers of this regiment.

Martin Cook, of Allegan, was a hospital steward. From Covington, Ky., the regiment entered upon active service on the 1st of June, 1863, and between that time and August 10th, in that year, marched twelve hundred and forty-two miles, exclusive of over sixteen hundred miles marched by detachments of the regiment while scouting, etc.

It was first engaged with the enemy on the Triplet, Kentucky, and Salt Rivers, and at Lebanon, Ky.

When the rebel Gen. John H. Morgan made his celebrated raid through the States of Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio, the Eighth was one of the foremost in the chase, and, hanging closely on his flanks and rear, at length brought him to bay at Buffington Island, Ohio.

Here, on the 19th of July, 1863, it immediately attacked and routed his forces; capturing two hundred and seventeen prisoners, besides killing and wounding many others.

Twice during this pursuit of Morgan the regiment marched forty-eight hours, halting but twice on each occasion, and then only for a few minutes.

At another time the chase was kept up for twenty-four hours, without stopping to feed and rest but once.

From Buffington Island the regiment returned to Kentucky, where it fought and defeated Scott's rebel Cavalry.

In August it advanced with the Union forces into East Tennessee.

At Calhoun and Athens, Tenn., on the 26th and 27th of September, the brigade to which it was attached was attacked and defeated by a rebel force of some ten thousand men, commanded by Forrest and Wheeler.

The Unionists retreated to Loudon; the Eighth having suffered a loss of forty-three men, killed and wounded, besides several missing.

Until the early part of February, 1864, the regiment was very actively engaged marching and skirmishing up and down the valleys of the Tennessee and Holston Rivers.

It had also engaged in all the operations termed the “siege of Knoxville," pursued Longstreet's retreating army, and fought him at Bean's Station, Dandridge, and Strawberry Plains.

On the 3d of February the regiment moved to Knoxville, transferred its horses to the quartermaster's department, and thence marched on foot to Mount Sterling, Ky., a tedious tramp of more than two hundred miles over the Cumberland Mountains.

It was there remounted, and on the 28th of June joined Gen. Sherman's army in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. On the march from Mount Sterling the regiment had scoured the country bordering the railroad; capturing one hundred and forty prisoners.

Forming part of Gen. Stoneman's Cavalry force, it covered the right of Gen. Sherman's infantry during the crossing of the Chattahoochee and the advance on Atlanta.

It participated in the Campbelltown and Macon raids in July, 1864, and a detachment of the Eighth succeeded in capturing and destroying three railroad-trains loaded with rebel stores.

In the latter raid, at Clinton, Ga., July 31st, the forces commanded by Gen. Stoneman were surrounded by a superior force of the enemy, and he ultimately surrendered, but prior to that time the Eighth, having obtained permission, charged through the enemy's ranks and endeavored to reach the Union lines near Atlanta.

On the 3d of August, however, being heavily worn out with service, having been in the saddle with little or no rest or sleep for seven days and eight nights, it was surprised and routed by the enemy with heavy loss; losing two hundred and fifteen officers and men, mostly taken prisoners.

The remainder of the regiment was employed on picket duty until the middle of September, 1864, when it was ordered to Nicholasville, Ky., and then back to Nashville, where it arrived on the 26th of October.

The Eighth was engaged through the month of November, skirmishing with the Cavalry advance of Hood's army, being several times surrounded by the enemy, but always managing to cut its way out.

After Hood was defeated at Franklin and Nashville and driven out of Tennessee, this regiment had no service more severe than that of suppressing the guerrilla bands who still infested the country.

In July the Eleventh Cavalry was consolidated with the Eighth, the combined regiment retaining the latter name.

It was mustered out of the United States service at Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 22, 1865, and was soon after paid off and disbanded at Jackson, Michigan

OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Field and Staff.

Col. Elisha Mix, Manlius; com. Dec. 3, 1864; Lieutenant-colonel., April 16, 1864; Major, March 2, 1863; mustered out with regiment, Sept. 22, 1865. (See Co. F.)

Asst.-Surg. Samuel D. Toby, Ganges; com. July 20, 1864; mustered out July 20, 1865.

1st Lieutenant and Adj. Homer Manvel, Saugatuck; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Non-Commissioned Staff.

Hosp.-Steward Martin Cook, Allegan; enlisted March 15, 1865; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company A.

Z. W. Hopkins, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Gordon B. Rust, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Company B.

David M. Austin, mustered out June 10, 1865.

James Fuller, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Delos W. Hare, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Charles O. Hicks, missing in action in Tennessee, Nov. 23, 1864.

William Jones, mustered out June 10, 1865.

William Pratt, mustered out June 10, 1865.

James B. Rhodes, mustered out June 10, 1865.

William 11. Rhodes, mustered out June 10, 1865.

William II. Randall, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Truman Smith, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Charles C. Wallen, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Edwin C. Wallen, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Fernando Yemens, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Company C.

Sylvester Farnsworth, mustered out June 6, 1865.

Company E.

2d Lieutenant Miles Horn, Otsego; com. Jan. 1, 1863; died of disease at Kalamazoo, Sept. 8, 1865.

W. D. Austin, mustered out Sept. 25, 1865.

Frederick E. Grant, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Charles H. Harper, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Joseph L. Payne, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Elisha E. Pratt, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

George Whitney, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Hiram Winters, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company F.

Captain Elisha Mix, Manlius; com. Nov. 1, 1862. (See Field and Staff.)

1st Lieutenant John E. Babbitt, com. Nov. 1, 1862; promoted to Captain Co. I, Aug. 31, 1863.

Q.M.-Sergeant Homer Manvel, Saugatuck; enlisted Nov. 28, 1862; promoted to 2d Lieutenant

Company H.

Sergeant John McDowell, Casco; enlisted Dec. 4, 1862; died in Andersonville prison, June 28, 1864.

Sergeant Miles Horn, Otsego; enlisted Jan. 1, 1863; promoted to 2d Lieutenant

Company E.

Sergeant Byron Teal, Cheshire; enlisted Nov. 22, 1862; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Corp. Richard A. Follett, Ganges; enlisted Dec. 20, 1862.

Corp. Timothy S. Cook, Casco; enlisted Dec. 20, 1862; transferred to navy, May 12, 1864.

Corp. James Buyce, Casco; enlisted Dec. 20, 1862; died of disease at Paris, Ky., April 12, 1864.

Corp. Stephen Fairbanks, Fillmore; enlisted Dec. 29, 1862; died of disease at Allegan, Jan. 21, 1865.

Teamster Elisha J. H. Walker, Ganges; mustered out June 19, 1865.

Teamster John Wilson, Otsego; discharged.

Farrier Charles E. Tompkins, Otsego; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Sol. J. Andrews, died of disease at Chattanooga, Aug. 8, 1864.

John Avery, discharged July 28, 1863.

Samuel Brown, discharged for disability, July 16, 1861.

W. Bidwell, died of disease at Knoxville, Tenn., Sept. 19, 1864.

Charles D. Bristol, discharged by order, June 26, 1865.

J. E. Brinkhart, died of disease in Iowa.

Walter Billings, discharged for disability, June 15, 1865.

Randall Billings, mustered out June 30, 1865.

John Blossom, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William Bailey, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

George H. Buchanan, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Jacob R. Boas, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Jay F. Barker, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

George H. Cushman, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Jacob Corwin, mustered out Sept. 19, 1865.

Charles Emmons, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

George H. Engles, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Seneca L. Everts, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Isaac Foster, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Michael Gilligan, discharged for disability, June 15, 1865.

Charles Hawkins, discharged.

William H. Howe, died of disease at Annapolis, March 23, 1865.

Juhn C. Haines, died of disease at Nashville, March 28, 1865.

Norman P. IIaines, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Lewis Huntley, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Seth Hinds, mustered out May 25, 1865.

George E. Kinney, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William H. Kinney, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

John A. Kinney, killed on Mississippi River steamer (Sultana), April 27, 1865.

Edward Lindsley, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865. J

oseph B. Morris, discharged by order, May 18, 1865.

Thomas J, Mills, discharged by order, July 20, 1865.

Matthew Orr, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William H. Parrish, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Charles Powers, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Stephen Powers, discharged for disability, Dec. 20, 1863.

William Pryor, died of disease in Tennessee, Aug. 9, 1864.

Harold Sherman, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William H. Thompson, died in Andersonville prison-pen, Aug 23, 1864.

Reuben Thomas, discharged by order, July 3, 1865.

EIGHTH, TENTH, AND ELEVENTH CAVALRY,

John M. Weaver, discharged by order, July 30, 1864.

Nathaniel Wellman, discharged for disability, May 27, 1865.

John J. Willerton, missing in action on raid to Macon, Ga., Aug. 4, 1864.

James Wasson, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company H.

2d Lieutenant Homer Manvel, Saugatuck; com. Nov. 20, 1864; promoted to 1st Lieutenant and adjt.

Charles W. Holmes, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Samuel W. Kendall, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Charles J. Seigner, died of disease in Indiana, Jan. 28, 1865.

James Stanton, died of disease in Tennessee, March 25, 1865.

Richard Williams, discharged by order, May 29, 1865.

Company L

Captain John E. Babbitt, honorably discharged, Dec. 27, 1864.

James T. Bentley, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

James Bassett, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

George Collins, mustered out June 13, 1865.

Philo L. Edson, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Enoch Howe, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Timothy V. Haight, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

eorge W. Knapp, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Martin Munzer, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Marshall Meriker, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

George W. Lawrence, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Theodore Larkins, died in Andersonville prison-pen, Jan. 22, 1865.

George E. Patten, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Reuben A. Putnam, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Orville J. Whitlock, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company K.

Sergeant Charles D. Gray, 2d Lieutenant; promoted April 25, 1865; not mustered; died of wounds at Pulaski, Tenn., April 30, 1865.

Warren Collins, died of disease at Annapolis, March 8, 1865.

Joseph Simmers, died in Andersonville prison-pen.

William Tudehope, discharged by order, May 31, 1865.

Samuel S. Thomas, discharged for promotion, Sept. 26, 1864.

Company L.

Isaac A. McCarthy, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

James H. Smith, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company M.

Hiram Annis, mustered out May 17, 1865.

Benjamin Ross, died of disease at Chattanooga, June 28, 1864.

OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company A.

Russell E. Benedict, died of disease at Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 23, 1865.

Reuben W. Norton, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company B.

Frank 0. Clark, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company D.

William H. Eaton, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company E.

Isaac Albrougli, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William Berringer, discharged by order, Sept. 21, 1865.

Company G.

Levi Breese, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Company I.

Eli Booth, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Company K.

W. W. Crowfoot, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company L.

1st Lieutenant Adrian L. Cook, Hastings; com. Jan. 8, 1865; mustered out Sept. 22, '65.

Marquis D. L. Crapo, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Dewitt 0. Dodge, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Henry C. Downs, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Nathan Eaton, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Silas Hewett, mustered out May 18, 1865.

Andrew Hathaway, died of disease at Bowling Green, Ky., Dec. 26, 1861.

John Johnson, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Simon Mathews, mustered out June 10, 1865.

George H. Robinson, discharged for disability, Feb. 24, 1865.

John Vredenburgh, mustered out June 10, 1865.

John W. Willard, mustered out June 10, 1865.

Company M.

Sergeant Adrian L. Cook, Hastings; promoted 2d Lieutenant

Jacob K. Ennis, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

TENTH CAVALRY.

The Tenth Regiment of Michigan Cavalry was recruited during the fall of 1863, its rendezvous being at the city of Grand Rapids.

Among the many counties represented in the organization were those of Allegan and Barry, but neither had a full company in its ranks.

With a force of nine hundred and twelve officers and men, commanded by Col. Thaddeus Foote, the regiment left its rendezvous on the 1st of December, 1863, and proceeded to Lexington, Ky., whence it marched, on the 13th of that month, to Camp Nelson.

During most of the winter of 1863-64 it was on duty at Burnside Point, Knoxville, and Strawberry Plains, Tenn.

On the 24th of April it was ordered to Carter's Station for the purpose of destroying the bridge over the Wautaga River, but failed in consequence of the enemy being in force and occupying an entrenched position.

In the engagement which ensued the Tenth lost eleven men killed and wounded and three missing.

On the 28th of May a detachment of one hundred and sixty men of the regiment, while engaged in a reconnaissance to Bull Gap and Greenville, encountered a superior force of the enemy, whom they put to rout; killing and wounding a large number, besides capturing thirty prisoners and a number of horses and mules.

During the summer of 1864 the regiment was actively engaged in various parts of East Tennessee, and with varying success fought the enemy at White Horn, Morristown, Bean's Station, Rogersville, Kingsport, Cany Branch, New Market, Moseburg, Williams' Ford, Dutch Bottom, Sevierville, Newport, Greenville, Mossy Creek, Bull Gap, Blue Spring, Strawberry Plains, Flat Creek Bridge, Sweet Water, Thornhill, Jonesboro', and Carter's Station.

On the 4th of September the regiment participated in the surprise and rout of Gen. John H. Morgan's forces at Greenville, Tenn.

In this engagement Gen. Morgan was killed and his staff and a large number of his men captured.

To Nov. 1, 1864, the regiment had lost in killed and wounded fifty-seven; missing in action, forty-four; by desertions, ninety-six; while the large number of one hundred and forty had died of disease.

In December the Tenth joined in the expedition to Saltville, Va., and assisted in destroying the salt-works at that point.

It also fought the enemy at Kingsport, Bristol, and Chucky Bend, Tenn.

Returning to Knoxville, its brigade soon after marched with Gen. Stoneman in his raid into North Carolina.

The regiment was engaged with the enemy at Brabson's Mills, Tenn., and at Boonville, N. C. Moving rapidly, vid Wilkesboro', and thence towards Salisbury, the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad was reached at Christiansburg, and one hundred miles of its line, together with the bridges, was destroyed.

This accomplished, the regiment made a rapid march to Henry Court-House, Va., traversing ninety-five miles in twenty-two hours.

At that point, on the 8th of April, 1865, it became engaged with a superior force of the enemy's Cavalry and infantry, and was compelled to retire with a loss of eight killed and wounded, Lieutenant Kenyon being among the former.

On the 9th and 10th, while the regiment was employed destroying the railroad and bridge north of Salisbury, at Abbott's Creek, the enemy was again encountered and defeated, after a three hours' contest.

The regiment then proceeded along the upper waters of the Catawba; picking up bands of rebel Cavalry endeavoring to make their escape southward.

It was engaged in skirmishes with the enemy at Statesville, N. C., on the 14th, and at Newton, N. C., on the 17th of April, 1865.

Upon the surrender of Johnston the Tenth joined in the movements looking to the capture of Jeff. Davis.

It was soon after ordered to West Tennessee, where it served until Nov. 11, 1865, when it was mustered out at Memphis, Tenn.;

The Tenth Regiment of Michigan Cavalry reached Jackson, Michigan, for final pay and disbandment, November 15th of the same year.

BARRY COUNTY SOLDIERS.

Company B.

Ashfield Graham, died of disease at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 22, 1865.

Samuel Hall, mustered out Nov. 21, 1865.

Minor Mead, mustered out Oct. 28, 1865.

Melvin Mead, died of disease at Knoxville, Tenn., April 5, 1865.

Moses H. Taylor, mustered out Nov. 21, 1865.

J. B. Upperson, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Company C.

William Vaughan, mustered out May 31, 1865.

Company D.

George W. Jay, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Albert A. Jay, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Company F.

John C. Coleman, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Edward Fisher, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Clinton A. Gregory, mustered out Oct. 4, 1865.

Myron H. Stephens, mustered out June 21, 1865.

Company G.

William Bundy, discharged by order, Aug. 30, 1865.

Lewis Landon, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Amos Leek, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Harvey G. Patrick, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

George T. Smith, mustered out Sept. 29, 1865.

Company H.

Hiram 0. Paine, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Company I.

Samuel W. Sturdevant, mustered out Nov. 22, 1865.

Company K.

Joseph H. Adams, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Edward S. Bronson, mustered out June 30, 1865. G

eorge W. Bump, mustered out Sept. 6, 1865.

Myron Bruce, mustered out Nov. 23, 1865.

Wallace M. Bracket, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Edward Cook, mustered out Sept. 19, 1865.

Nelson W. Cook, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Edward Chaffee, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Byron Johnson, mustered out Nov. 15, 1865.

Daniel Lewis, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Frederick F. McNair, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Melvin Mead, died of disease at Lenoir, Tenn., June 22, 1865.

Edgar D. Reid, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Albert Sponible, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Washington Sponible,n'ust. out Nov. 22, 1865.

Company L.

Thomas J. Curties, discharged for disability, Jan. 12, 1865.

Wm. Estess, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Walter M. Keagle, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Allen T. Rowley, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Company M.

Frank Demond, died of disease at Knoxville, Tenn., July 20, 1865.

Richard Demond, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

MEMBERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Company E.

Captain Wm. H. Dunn, Ganges; com. Jan. 6, 1865; 1st Lieutenant, April 25, 1864;

2d Lieutenant Co. D, July 25, 1863; brevet Major, U. S. Vols., April 11, 1865, for gallantry in action at Abbot's Creek, N. C.; mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

William A. Alien, discharged by order, Aug. 18, 1865.

George E. Dunn, discharged for disability, Aug. 24, 1865.

George Jones, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Charles H. Taylor, mustered out Oct. 9, 1865.

Company F.

Edwin Conrad, discharged by order, June 25, 1865.

Company I.

Edward Margason, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

William A. Palmer, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

John Stephens, discharged for disability, June 13, 1863.

Company L.

S. P. Howard, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Lester Multhop, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

Peter Stacey, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

George Whittle, mustered out Nov. 11, 1865.

ELEVENTH CAVALRY.

This regiment was recruited at Kalamazoo during the summer and fall of 1863.

It was mustered into the service December 10th, and under the command of Col. Simeon B. Brown left its rendezvous for the field on the 17th of the same month; its rolls showing the names of nine hundred and twenty-one officers and enlisted men.

Company C was almost wholly from Barry County, while the same county was also represented in all the other companies except those of A, B, E, and I.

Six men from Allegan County were distributed among five different companies. (See roster.)

The Eleventh proceeded to Lexington, Ky., and, after receiving arms and equipments, was employed during the months of January and February, 1864, in scouting; having its headquarters at Lexington.

In April it moved to Louisa, Ky., and, with the Thirty-Ninth Kentucky Infantry, with which it was brigaded, was employed in protecting the eastern part of the State from rebel raids and incursions, which came in from Virginia, until the last of May, when it was sent on an expedition into West Virginia, under Gens. Burbridge and Hobson; but, hearing that the rebels, under Morgan, had invaded Kentucky, the division returned, and by forced marching overtook the enemy at Mount Sterling, Ky.

Here, on the 8th of June, the enemy was routed with severe loss.

On the 12th of the same month the rebels were again encountered at Cynthiana, and a second time defeated and dispersed.

From August 23d to September 17th it was stationed at Camp Burnside, on the Cumberland River, and was employed, with other troops, in protecting the southern part of Kentucky from threatened invasion by Gen. Wheeler's Cavalry.

In the latter part of September it was engaged in a raid to Saltville, Va.

At Bowen's Farm the regiment was warmly engaged, and also at Richland Gap and Rich Mountain, and was part of the assaulting force upon the enemy's position at Saltville, which, defended by a superior force, was found too strong to be captured.

During the return march into Kentucky the Eleventh formed the rear-guard.

At Sandy Mountain it was nearly surrounded by the enemy, but succeeded, after a severe struggle, in rejoining the command.

During November it was constantly engaged in clearing the country of guerrillas, and had severe skirmishing at Hazel Green, McCormack's Farm, Morristown, Mount Sterling, and other points.

It was at Crab Orchard and Cumberland Gap; marching from the latter place to Clinch River, where it had a sharp fight December 28th.

From the 1st to the 11th of December it was engaged in scouting and foraging about Bean's Station, Morristown, Russellville, Whitesboro', and Cobb's Ford.

On the 11th of December it moved with Gen. Stoneman's command into North Carolina, and on the 13th was at Bristol, where a number of prisoners and a large amount of stores were captured.

At Max Meadow Station the regiment destroyed a large arsenal.

It skirmished with the enemy's Cavalry about Marion on the 17th, and the whole command had a severe fight with Breckenridge's infantry, the enemy finally falling back.

The command then proceeded to Saltville, where the enemy's extensive salt-works were destroyed.

After an arduous campaign the regiment finally returned to Lexington, Ky., where it arrived on the 2d of January, 1865, many of the men having lost their horses and coming in on foot.

During the campaign from November 17th to January 2d the regiment had marched an average of twenty-eight miles a day, not including scouting and foraging.

It was engaged in scouting the eastern portion of Kentucky until February 23d, when it was ordered to join Gen. Stoneman's command at Knoxville, which it did on the 15th of March, moving by way of Louisville and Nashville.

It formed a part of the expedition under Stoneman into East Tennessee, North and South Carolina, and Georgia.

At Salisbury, N. C., where it arrived on the 12th of April, the command was engaged with a superior force of the enemy, and captured eighteen hundred prisoners and twenty-two guns, besides destroying a large amount of property, including the railway and telegraph lines.

From Salisbury it marched to Asheville, where, on the 26th of April, it captured two hundred prisoners and a large amount of property and munitions of war.

On the 1st of May it was at Anderson Court-House, S. C.*

On the 11th it captured the Cavalry escort of Jefferson Davis, near Washington, and on the 13th was on the Tugaloo and Savannah Rivers.

Returning from this great raid, the regiment reached Knoxville, Tenn., on the 3d of June, and encamped at Lenoir Station until the 24th, when it moved by rail to Pulaski, where, on the 20th of July, it was consolidated with the Eighth Michigan Cavalry.

It was mustered out of service at Nashville, Tenn., on the 22d of September.

Returned to Michigan on the 28th, and was paid and disbanded.

OFFICERS AND MEN FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company C.

1st Lieutenant Charles A. Bailey, Hastings; com. Oct. 23, 1863; discharged for disability, August (?).

2d Lieutenant Theron Mason, Hastings; com. Jan. 3, 1865; Sergeant, Sept. 2, 1863; transferred to 8th Cavalry.

Com.-Sergeant Henry A. Lathrop, Castleton; enlisted Sept. 22, 1863; promoted in U. S. C. T.

Com.-Sergeant Harmon H. Munger, Hastings; transferred to 8th Cavalry. 7-7 1 'I

Sergeant David Todd, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 18, 1863; died of disease at Nashville, March 25, 1865.

Sergeant Augustus Taylor, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 14, 1863; transferred to 8th Cavalry.

Sergeant Nelson Parker, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 28, 1863; transferred to 8th Cavalry.

Corp. Isaac B. Monk, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 10, 1863; transferred to 8th Cavalry.

Corp. Michael McFarlin, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 3, 1863; discharged by order, Sept. 1, 1865.

Corp. John W. Stillson, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 20, 1863; transferred to 8th Cavalry.

Corp. Frederick Myers, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 25, 1863; mustered out March 1, 1865.

Farrier George Munger, Hastings; enlisted Oct. 18, 1863; transferred to 8th Cavalry.

Farrier William D. Vaughn, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 16, 1863; must, out May 31, 1865.

Wagoner P. B. Homan, Hastings; enlisted Sept. 15, 1863; transferred to 8th Cavalry.

John W. Bronson, discharged by order, Aug. 4, 1865. J

oshua Boorom. mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William P. Boorom, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William F. Brown, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

E. W. Benjamin, mustered out May 19, 1865.

Moses E. Baylor, mustered out June 16, 1865.

N. J. Bronson, mustered out June 16, 1865.

Adrian Cook, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Levi Chase, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Marcus L. Cooley, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Elbridge Carr, mustered out May 13, 1865.

George L. Crosby, mustered out May 16, 1865.

George W. Cassady, died of disease at Lexington, Ky., Aug. 28, 1864.

Alfred Drake, died of disease at Camp Nelson, Ky.

Oscar F. Dunham, discharged by order, Aug. 10, 1865.

Anson Fowle, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Charles Horton, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William H. Hayward, died of disease at Mt. Sterling, Ky., Feb. 16, 1865.

Seymour Harris, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Patrick McFarlin, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Edward H. McCormick, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Riley Munger, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Henry Miller, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

William H. Maloy, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Henry Marble, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Dec. 30, 1864.

Horace A. Orwig, mustered out May 16, 1865.

George W. Peck, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Amasa L. Quant, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Israel Roush, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Benjamin F. Roush, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Peter L. Rorke, mustered out June 16, 1865.

James L. Reed, transferred to U. S. C. T.

James Swin, discharged by order, Aug. 10, 1865.

Isaac Stanton, died of disease at Ashland, Ky., Jan. 20, 1865.

Frederick A. Spencer, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Peter D. Sage, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Henry D. Thompson, mustered out Aug. 31, 1865.

Company D.

W. H. Knickerbocker, mustered out June 16, 1865.

Company F.

Sergeant Lewis A. Raymond, Castleton; enlisted Sept. 16, 1863; discharged by order, May 26, 1865.

Sergeant Norman H. Latham, Baltimore; enlisted Sept. 9, 1863; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Corp. Michael Fisher, Prairieville; enlisted Sept. 9, 1863; transferred to 8th Cavalry.

Wagoner John Case, Johnstown; enlisted Oct. 5, 1863; transferred to 8th Cavalry.

Alonzo R. Coe, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Russell B. Norton, transferred to 8th Michigan Inf.

John R. Snow, died of disease at Marion, Va., Dec. 15, 1864.

Philo Shaff, mustered out July 13, 1865.

Robert Strong, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

James Strong, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Benjamin Tungate, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

John Tungate, died of disease at Richmond, Va., May 10, 1865.

Company G.

Sergeant Albert S. Eno, Maple Grove; enlisted Oct. 5, 1863; transferred to 8th Cavalry.

Co. B.

Cassius M. Gould, discharged by order, Aug. 10, 1865.

Andrew J. Henrich, mustered out July 19, 1865.

Henry H. Mayo, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Reuben Norton, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

James P. Stokes, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company H.

G. 0. Clark, transferred to 8th Michigan Cavalry.

Philo R. Dunning, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company K.

Daniel Crump, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company L.

David R. Dutton, mustered out Sept. 18, 1865.

George Norwood, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

George Penock, discharged by order, Aug. 10, 1865.

 

At Anderson it was estimated that the command destroyed three million dollars' worth of public property.

At this point also were found and brought away a great amount of Confederate paper money, and three of the plates (engraved in England) upon which bills were printed.

These last, together with a specimen gold coin (five dollars), struck by private enterprise, are the property of Gen. C. E. Smith, of Kalamazoo.

HISTORY OF ALLEGAN AND BARRY COUNTIES, MICHIGAN.

Company M.

E. H. Corwin, discharged by order, May 30, 1865.

Henry Howe, mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

ALLEGAN COUNTY MEMBERS.

Company C.

Corp. Wm. Herbert, Gun Plains; enlisted Oct. 15, 1863; mustered out Sept. 22, 1865.

Company F.

Edgar F. Brundage, dlsch. for disability, May 1, 1865.

Company H.

Monroe Durkee, transferred to 8th Cavalry.

Alonzo Kenney, discharged by order, June 21, 1865.

Company I.

Sergeant Win. Bartlett, Ganges; enlisted Sept. 25, 1863; mustered out Aug. 10, 1865.

Company L.

Chas. E. Day, mustered out May 29, 1865.

MERRILL HORSE.

This was the name of a body of Cavalry recognized as a Missouri regiment, three companies of which, viz., H, I, and L, were raised in the State of Michigan, and to the close of the war retained their distinctive character as Michigan troops so far that their officers were commissioned by and their members credited to the latter State.

Companies H and I were recruited early in the autumn of 1861, and the latter company especially had a large representation from Barry County.

Company L was not organized until December, 1862.

The regiment to which these companies belonged served during the whole term of its service with the Western armies.

It engaged the enemy at Memphis, Moore's Hill, and Kirksville, Mo., in 1862.

At Brownsville, Bayou Mecoe, Ashley's Bayou, Little Rock, Benton, Princeton, Little Missouri River, Prairie Dehan, Camden, and Jenkins' Ferry, Ark., in 1863-64.

At Franklin, Otterville, Independence, and Big Blue, Mo., in October, 1864.

In the latter part of 1864 the regiment was transferred to Nashville, Tenn.; thence by steamers it proceeded to Eastport, Miss., and on the 11th of February, 1865, it began a march, via Florence, Huntsville, Stevenson, and Bridgeport, Alabama, to Chattanooga, Tenn.

During the remainder of its term of service it was employed in Northern Georgia on scout duty.

In Georgia it encountered the enemy at Trenton Gap, Alpine, and Summerville.

Its service closed on the 21st of September, 1865, when it was mustered out at Nashville, Tenn.

MEMBERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company H.

1st Lieutenant Nathan J. Aiken; com. Aug. 26, 1861; resigned March 18, 1862.

Samuel Baird, mustered out Sept. 19, 1865.

Sidney S. Fish, discharged by order, June 15, 1865.

Luther Holman, died of disease at Augusta, Michigan, July 15, 1864.

James Paul, mustered out Sept. 19, 1865.

Isaac Snyder, died of disease at Memphis, Tenn., Feb. 21, 1865.

Company I.

2d Lieutenant Lucien B. Potter, Maple Grove; com. July 2, 1862; promoted to 1st Lieutenant

Co. B.

Sergeant John M1 Gitchell, enlisted Aug. 26, 1861; veteran, Jan. 5, 1864; mustered out Sept. 19, 1865.

Sergeant Hubbard L. Baldwin, enlisted Aug. 27, 1861; veteran, Jan. 5, 1864; mustered out July 25. 1865.

Sergeant John M. Brown, enlisted Aug. 23, 1861; veteran, Jan. 5, 1864; mustered out Sept. 19, 1865.

Corp. James E. Jones, enl Aug. 27, 1861; discharged for disability, May 30, 1862.

Corp. John M. White, enlisted Aug. 17, 1861; discharged for disability, Jan. 9, 1863.

Corp. John D. Christley, enlisted Aug. 30, 1861.

Corp. Albert -H. Eaton, enlisted Aug. 28, 1861; veteran, Jan. 5, 1864; mustered out Sept. 19, 1865.

Farrier Sylvester D. White, enlisted Aug. 24, 1861; died of disease at St. Louis, Mo., Nov. 4, 1861.

Orsemis Britton, discharged at end of service, Sept. 15, 1864.

Henry Houghtalin, discharged for disability, Nov. 21, 1862.

Wesley Houghtalin, discharged for disability, May 9, 1862.

Theron Haynes, died of wounds received at Memphis, July 18, 1865.

Benjamin J. Hall, died of disease at Fayette, Mo., April 26, 1862.

Rufus B. Harrington, mustered out Sept. 19, 1865.

Nathaniel Jeffries, discharged for disability, April 6, 1862.

Reuben Johnson, discharged for disability, Feb. 26, 1862.

John H. Johnson, discharged for disability, April 24, 1862.

Edwin Mills, discharged by order, June 15, 1865.

Henry S. Scoville, died of disease at Fayette, Mo., March 13, 1862.

George Scoville, died in action at Memphis, Mo., July 18, 1862.

John H. Taylor, died in action at Moore's Hill, July 28, 1862.

Moses B. Taylor, discharged for disability, Sept. 13, 1861.

James Willson, died in action at Memphis, Mo., July 18, 1862.

Charles Wilkinson, died of disease at St. Louis, Mo., Dec. 9, 1861.

Company L.

Sergt. James Telford, Johnstown; enlisted Nov. 29, 1862; died of disease at Little Rock, Ark., Aug. 12, 1864.

ALLEGAN COUNTY MEMBERS.

Company H.

William J. Hensell, discharged by order, June 15, 1865.

Company I.

Charles Ingraham, mustered out Sept. 19, 1865.

FIRST LIGHT ARTILLERY.

Batteries unconnected with each other-Battery C largely from Allegan County-Its Services in Northern Mississippi-It joins Sherman-The Atlanta Campaign-Its Battles-Marching through Georgia-The Carolina Campaign-Muster out-

Soldiers of the First Light Artillery from Allegan County-From Barry County.

This regiment contained a comparatively large number of men from the counties of Allegan and Barry, but they were scattered through several of the batteries of which the regiment was composed, and the histories of these batteries are as unconnected with each other as are those of the same number of Cavalry or infantry regiments.

Therefore the First Light Artillery cannot be described as a whole; nor is it practicable, except in the case of Battery C, to give separate sketches of the several batteries, in each of which a few men only were found from these counties.

Battery C, however, drew about forty men from the two counties (all but one, we believe, from Allegan), and of that we will therefore give a slight sketch.

Its first official designation was the Third Michigan Battery, but it was most commonly known as " Dees' Battery."

It had its rendezvous at Grand Rapids, and was recruited into service in connection with the Third Cavalry.

Commanded by Captain Alexander W. Dees, it left its rendezvous on the 17th of December, 1861, and joined the forces then assembling for operations against the enemy on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers.

It was engaged in the battle of Farmington, Miss., May 9, 1862;

Siege of Corinth, Miss., May 10 to 31, 1862; battle Iuka, Miss., Sept. 19, 1862;

Corinth, Miss., Oct. 3 to 4, 1862; and at Lumpkin's Mills, Miss., Nov. 29, 1862, where it disabled two of the rebel guns, and with a Cavalry brigade forced the enemy into their earthworks at the Tallahatchie River.

It continued in service in Northern Mississippi and West Tennessee until the spring of 1864, when it joined Gen. Sherman's army, then operating in Northern Georgia.

During the hotly-contested Atlanta campaign, Battery C successfully engaged the enemy at Resaca, May 14th; Dallas, May 27th;

Big Shanty, June 15th; Kenesaw Mountain, June 25th;

Nickajack Creek, July 1st; Decatur, July 20th; and the siege of Atlanta, July 22 to Aug. 25, 1864.

From Nov. 1-12, 1864, it was engaged in the pursuit of Hood's rebel army into Northern Alabama.

On the 16th of the same month, with Gen. Sherman's army, it began the march "through Georgia."

Hardee's rebel forces were encountered in front of Savannah on the 9th of December, and Battery C assisted in driving him inside his works.

On the 10th it engaged him all day, and on the 11th dismounted one of his guns and silenced others.

On the 4th of January, 1865, it embarked on a transport for Beaufort, N. C., and on the 16th was in camp at Pocotaligo.

Its Carolina campaign was commenced on the 29th of January, and on the 9th of February it was warmly engaged with the enemy at the crossing of the South Edisto River.

Columbia was reached on the 17th, and on the 4th of March, near Cheraw, the rebels were again encountered and defeated, and twenty-eight guns were taken from them.

The Cape Fear River was crossed at Fayetteville, N. C.

On the 13th of March the enemy was attacked and driven from his position.

The series of actions which culminated at Bentonville, N. C., March 19th and 20th, the advance to Goldsboro', N. C., the pursuit of Johnston to and through Raleigh, his surrender, the march to Washington, D. C., via Richmond, Va., and the grand review at the nation's capital, were events in which Battery C took an active part.

It arrived in Washington, D. C., May 23d, marched to Detroit, Michigan, June 13th, and was there mustered out of the service, June 22, 1865.

ALLEGAN COUNTY SOLDIERS IN THE FIRST LIGHT ARTILLERY.

Battery A.

Albert Bragg, mustered out July 28, 1865.

John H. Hicks, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 15, 1863.

Battery B.

William C. Thayer, veteran, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863; mustered out June 14, 1865.

Battery C.

2d Lieutenant Asa Estabrook, Allegan; com. Dec. 18, 1864; mustered out June 22, 1865.

Sergeant Martin V. Heath, Allegan; enlisted Oct. 11, 1861; discharged for disability, April 24, 1862.

Corp. James Sullivan, Allegan; enlisted Oct. 25, 1861; discharged for disability, Sept. 12, 1862.

Corp. Frank Fort, Allegan; enlisted Oct. 14, 1861; veteran, Dec. 28, 1863; mustered out June 22, 1865.

Saddler James Clark, Allegan; enlisted Oct. 14, 1861; veteran, Dec. 28, 1863; mustered out June 22, 1865.

Musician Benoni Collins, Allegan; enlisted Nov. 8, 1861; discharged for disability, July 11, 1862.

Fitch R. Barker, died of disease at St. Louis, March 11, 1862.

John S. Crary, discharged for disability, March 24, 1862.

Warren Collins, discharged for disability, March 4, 1862.

Volney Clark, discharged for disability, Aug. 8, 1862.

Luman Cooley, discharged for disability, Feb. 26, 1863.

Iarmon H. Cooley, discharged for disability, Sept. 1, 1862.

Benjamin B Carter, veteran, enlisted Dec. 28, 1863; mustered out June 22, 1865.

Enos Clark, veteran, enlisted Dec. 28, 1863; mustered out June 22, 1865.

John S. Curtis, mustered out June 22, 1865.

Abel Dunton, discharged for disability, Dec. 4, 1862.

Elijah Evans, veteran, enlisted Dec. 28, 1863; mustered out June 22, 1865.

Horace Eldred, mustered out June 22, 1865.

John Frank, discharged for disability, Oct. 8, 1862.

Angus Frazer, mustered out.

Herbert Howe, discharged at end of service, Dec. 18, 1864.

John H Iemmett, died of disease at Rome, Ga., Aug. 22, 1864.

Frank J. Higgins, discharged at end of service, Dec. 18, 1864.

Burroughs Ingham, veteran, enlisted Dec. 28, 1863; mustered out June 22, 1865.

Chandler B. Jones, discharged for disability, Oct. 8, 1862.

Abram Morris, died of disease in Missouri, May 14, 1862.

Edward Nichols, died of disease in Indiana, May 19, 1862.

Solomon Ostrander, discharged at end of service, Dec. 18, 1864.

Henry D. Synes, died of disease at St. Louis, Jan. 18, 1862.

Elihu Smith, veteran, enlisted Dec. 28, 1863; mustered out June 22, 1865.

Earl B. Tyler, discharged for disability, Jan. 11, 1862.

Absalom Walker, discharged for disability, Aug. 25, 1862.

Philip Valmy, discharged for disability, Aug. 11, 1862.

Battery F.

Daniel Burleson, discharged by order, June 17, 1865.

Battery G.

Alpheus Mansfield, died of disease at Fort Gaines, Ala., Dec. 6, 1864.

Solomon Shoemaker, died of disease at Greenville, La., Aug. 22, 1861.

Jos. St. Clair, discharged at end of service, Feb. 12, 1865.

Battery H.

Wilson Rossman, mustered out July 22, 1865.

Battery K.

Geo. K. Lewis, discharged by order, May 17, 1865.

Battery L.

James French, died of disease at Coldwater, Michigan, April 26, 1863.

Wm. C. Thornton, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, May 1, 1864.

FOURTEENTH BATTERY.

Sergeant Wm. E. Forbes, Gun Plain; enlisted Sept. 7, 1863; on detached service,

Corp. John Flynn, Gun Plain; enlisted Sept. 4, 1863; mustered out July 1, 1865.

OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS FROM BARRY COUNTY IN THE FIRST LIGHT ARTILLERY.

Battery A.

James McCalley, died of disease at Chattanooga, Tenn., May 8, 1864.

Andrew J. Mattison, mustered out July 25, 1865.

Battery B.

Jesse C. Benjamin, discharged for wounds, June 3, 1865.

Franklin Campbell, mustered out June 3, 1865.

John Castle, mustered out June 14, 1865.

Augustus Ford, mustered out June 14, 1865.

David M. Hueston, discharged by order, June 29, 1865.

William Palmatier, died of disease at Rome, Ga., Aug. 20, 1864.

Henry L. Raymond, died of disease at Rome, Ga., July 27, 1864.

Chester S. Stoddard, mustered out June 14, 1865.

Ralph T. Stocking, mustered out June 14, 1865.

John Slamm, mustered out June 14, 1865.

Battery C.

Charles HI. Williams. mustered out June 14, 1865.

Battery E.

1st Lieutenant Leonard Wightman, Hastings; com. March 16, 1864; 2d Lieutenant Oct. 1, 1862; (previously a corporal) bvt. Captain, June 20, 1865, "for meritorious services;" mustered out July 20, 1865.

John Burd, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

John Carpenter, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

George W. Cain, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

Amos Greentiam, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

Nathan Lucas, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

Lucius L. Landon, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

James McNee, discharged by order, June 30, 1865.

John McNee, discharged by order, June 26, 1865.

Jacob Odell, mustered out Aug. 20, 1865.

Elijah A. Shaw, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

George C. Smith, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

Cornelius Senter, discharged by order, June 30, 1865.

George D. Scoviile, transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Oct. 18, 1864.

Rufus W. Vester, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

Peter Wilbert, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

Miles S. Young, mustered out Aug. 30, 1865.

Battery G.

William Cranston, discharged for disability, May 13, 1865.

Dayton S. Peck, mustered out Aug. 6, 1865.

Battery I.

John I. Miller, mustered out July 14, 1865.

Battery K.

William Quick, died of disease at Chattanooga, Tenn.

Batteries L.

Sergeant Austin D. Johnson, Prairieville; enlisted March 16, 1863; mustered out Aug. 22, 1865.

Corp. George H. Brooks, Orangeville; enlisted March 16, 1863; discharged for promotion in 30th Inf.

Thomas McLane, mustered out Aug. 22, 1865.

Jesse Quick, discharged for disability, May 13, 1865.

Richard Shaw, died of disease at Camp Nelson, Ky., July 14, 1865.

William Swartout, mustered out Aug. 22, 1865.

Thirteenth Battery.

Edwin P. Clark, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Zebulon Caswell, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Jeremiah Harper, mustered out July 1, 1865.

Peter Schrontz, died of disease at Fort Sumner, Md., Dec. 25, 1864.

Heman Train, died of disease at Fort Sumner, Md., Nov. 29, 1864.

SOLDIERS OF OTHER REGIMENTS.

Remarks on the scattering Soldiers of Allegan and Barry Counties Men in the First Infantry-In the Fifth Infantry-In the Tenth Infantry-In the Eleventh Infantry-In the Fifteenth Infantry-In the Sixteenth Infantry-In the Eighteenth Infantry-In the Twentieth Infantry-In the Twenty-Fourth Infantry-In the Twenty-Fifth Infantry-In the Twenty-Sixth Infantry-In the Twenty-Seventh Infantry-In the First Colored Infantry-In the First Sharpshooters-In the Forty-Fourth Illinois Infantry-In the Sixty-Sixth Illinois Infantry-In the Nineteenth Wisconsin Infantry-In the First United States Sharpshooters-

Miscellaneous.

BESIDES the commands whose histories have been thus briefly outlined, there were many others containing soldiers from Allegan and Barry Counties, soldiers whose records are equally as bright and honorable as those of any in the army, but of whom we cannot speak here, owing to the smallness of the number in each organization.

We gladly give, however, the following list of their names:

FIRST INFANTRY.

FROM ALLEGAN.

Dennis Cosier, Co. K; veteran, enlisted Feb. 17, 1864; discharged by order, July 6, 1865.

John Dorrance, Co. K; discharged June 1, 1863.

FROM BARRY.

Frederick Cook, Co. H; mustered out July 9, 1865.

FIFTH INFANTRY.

FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Charles J. Jenner, Co. D; discharged at end of service, Dec. 17, 1863.

1st Lieutenant Daniel E. Bitdsell, Co. E, Hastings; com. Sept. 1, 1864; 2d Lieutenant, June 10, 1864; Sergeant; wounded Oct. 27, 1864; discharged for disability, Jan. 10, 1865.

John Gaff, mustered out July 5, 1865.

Edward Stevens, mustered out July 5, 1865.

George Shultz, mustered out July 5, 1865.

Milo Fisher, Co. F; mustered out July 5, 1865.

Joseph Foster, Co. I; mustered out July 5, 1865.

Mortimer Lowing, Co. I, mustered out May 31, 1865.

TENTH INFANTRY.

FROM ALLEGAN.

Eli Baker, Co. B; mustered out July 19, 1865.

Johnson Parsons, Co. C; mustered out. July 19, 1865.

Chas. F. Smith, Co. E; mustered out Aug. 3, 1865.

Thos. Hayner, Co. G; mustered out July 19, 1865.

Ethan Whitney, Co. I; mustered out July 19, 1865.

Francis H. Norton, Co. K; mustered out July 19, 1865.

FROM BARRY.

John W. Snyder, Co. A; mustered out July 19, 1865.

Charles A. Allen, Co. B; mustered out July 18, 1865.

Niel t. Alden, Co. C; mustered out Aug. 21, 1865.

William H. Muffley, Co. C; mustered out July 19, 1865.

Thomas McGuire, Co. G; died of disease at New Albany, Ind., Feb. 4, 1865.

ELEVENTH INFANTRY.

FROM ALLEGAN.

Corp. James Sprague, Co. G; discharged at end of service, Sept. 30, 1864.

Joseph Annis, Co. G; discharged at end of service, Sept. 30, 1864.

James Rose, Co. G; discharged at end of service, Sept. 30, 1864.

Wm. II. Smith, Co. G; died of disease, Feb. 4, 1862.

Darius Sprague, Co. G; discharged at end of service, Sept. 30, 1865.

ELEVENTH INFANTRY (NEW).

FROM ALLEGAN.

Talbot Ballinger, Co. B; mustered out Sept. 16, 1865.

Lewis C. Cady, Co. B; mustered out Sept. 16, 1865.

James Lutz, Co. B; mustered out Sept. 16, 1865.

David Stevenson, Co. B; mustered out Sept. 16, 1865.

FIFTEENTH INFANTRY

MEMBERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

George W. Colborne, Co. A; died of disease at Louisville, Ky., June 10, 1865.

Albert N. Russell, Co. A; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Ezra H. Heath, Co. B; discharged by order, July 1, 1865.

Thomas Burt, Co. C; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Ralph Parrish, Co. C; discharged by order, July 1, 1865.

Cortland Brownell, Co. D; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

John Haywood, Co. D; discharged by order, July 20, 1865.

Charles W. Tyler, Co. D; discharged by order, June 16, 1865.

George Kitson, Co. E; mustered out July 18, 1865.

John H. Butler, Co. F; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Sidney M. Bennett, Co. F; discharged by order, May 30, 1865.

James Reeves, Co. F; discharged by order, July 26, 1865.

Peter Schneider, Co. F; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Sylvanus Snell, Co. F; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Gaylord Helmer, Co. H; discharged by order, May 31, 1865.

George W. Roe, Co. H; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Austin G. Pike, Co. I; discharged by order, July 1, 1865.

Charles Butler, Co: K; discharged by order, July 15, 1865.

BARRY COUNTY MEMBERS.

Asa S. Durham, Co. A; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Mills W. Corning, Co. C; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

James Curley, Co. D; discharged by order, Aug. 28, 1865.

George W. Shepard, Co. D; discharged by order, June 22, 1865.

James Racey, Co. E; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Henry Blodgett, Co. F; discharged by order, May 30, 1865.

Amphious Bliss, Co. F; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Edwin C. Davis, Co. G; discharged by order, May 30, 1865.

Austin D. Bates, Co. H; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Orison Lovewell, Co. H; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Alfred S. Millard, Co. H; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Elnathan Gilbert, Co. I; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

William F. M. Mitchell, Co. K; mustered out Aug. 13, 1865.

Robert Rouse, Co. K; discharged by order, May 30, 1865.

SIXTEENTH INFANTRY MEMBERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Jacob Lugensland, Co. A; mustered out July 8, 1865.

John W. Brown, Co. B; mustered out July 8, 1865.

Austin Corbett, Co. B; discharged by order, Aug. 26, 1865.

John Hoof, Co. B; mustered out July 8, 1865.

Elias Leonard, Co. B; mustered out July 8, 1865.

John McCreery, Co. B; mustered out July 8, 1865.

James R. Griswold, Co. C; mustered out July 8, 1865.

Alexander Hayden, Co. C; mustered out July 8, 1865.

James O'Brien, Co. C; mustered out July 8, 1865.

Richard Purdy, Co. C; mustered out July 8, 1865.

John Thomas, Co. C; mustered out July 8, 1865.

Harmon Campbell, Co. F; discharged by order, June 14, 1865.

Robert H. Gould, Co. K; mustered out July 8, 1865.

Jerry Munro, Co. I; discharged by order, May 30, 1865.

BARRY COUNTY MEMBERS.

Daniel Myers, Co. D; mustered out July 8, 1865.

Francis O. N. Leonard, Co. I; veteran, March 1, 1864.

Louis B. Barber, Co. K; mustered out July 8, 1865.

George Roth, Co. K; mustered out July 8, 1865.

 

EIGHTEENTH INFANTRY FROM ALLEGAN.

Benjamin M. Curtis, Co. C; died of disease at Lexington, Ky., Dec. 21, 1862.

John A. Carpenter, Co. C; mustered out June 26, 1865.

SOLDIERS OF OTHER REGIMENTS.

TWENTIETH INFANTRY FROM BARRY.

Thomas H. Barker, Co. C; died of disease near Falmouth, Va., Jan. 10, 1863.

Willard S. Cook, Co. C; died of disease, Dec. 12, 1862.

Ira Messinger, Co. C; died of disease at Falmouth, Va., Dec. 28, 1862.

Samuel W. Onwig, Co. C; died of disease in Andersonville prison, Ga., Sept. 8, 1864.

Oliver J. Stevenson, Co. C; mustered out May 30, 1865.

Captain George W. Bullis, Johnstown; Co. F, Nov. 28, 1863; 1st Lieutenant Co. I, July 29, 1862; discharged for disability, Aug. 10, 1864.

TWENTY-SECOND INFANTRY FROM BARRY.

Mortimer W. Hunter, Co. F; died of disease at Richmond, Va., June 8, 1865.

Florence A. Hunter, Co. F; died of disease at Richmond, Va., June 8, 1865.

TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY

MEMBERS FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

William F. Henry, Co. A; died of disease at Camp Butler, Ill., March 28, 1865.

Selden Sperry, Co. A; mustered out June 30, 1865.

William White, Co. A; died of disease at Camp Butler, Ill., April 8, 1865.

Rollin Wood, Co. A; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Clark Bailey, Co. E; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Newton Belden, Co. E; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Edward Crew, Co. E; died of disease at Camp Butler, Ill., May 14, 1865.

Hollis Ward, Co. E; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Gideon Chilson, Co. F; mustered out June 30, 1865.

John G. Collins, Co. F; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Orson J. Davis, Co. F; mustered out June 30, 1865.

George Doxey, Co. F; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Henry De Roslyn, Co. F; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Charles M. Failing, Co. F; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Benjamin F. Lamoyne, Co. F; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Samuel Piper, Co. F; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Luther S. Pelham, Co. F; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Edward Rogers, Co. F; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Thomas Iddles, Co. H; mustered out June 30, 1865.

James W. Parker, Co. H; died of disease at Camp Butler, Ill., March 21, 1865.

James Blytheman, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

James Daama, Co. I; mustered out June 28, 1865.

Cornelius Lockker, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Garrett N. Nieland, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Mathew Notier, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Jerome Mockma, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Frank S. Popplewell, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Everett Russell, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

James Roe, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Joseph Sharpe, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

John Scriven, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

John F. Tidd, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Gardner A. Terry, Co. I; mustered out June 30, 1865.

Lewis Mapes, Co. K; died of disease at Camp Butler, April 25, 1865.

FROM BARRY.

Detzel Bradford, mustered out June 21, 1865.

TWENTY-FIFTH INFANTRY FROM BARRY.

Moses Steeber, Co. H; mustered out June 24, 1865.

TWENTY-SIXTH INFANTRY MEMBERS FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Company H.

2d Lieutenant Jesse Jordan, Woodland; com. Dec. 23, 1863; discharged for wounds, Dec. 5, 1864.

Company I

Sergeant Jesse Jordan, Woodland; enlisted Aug. 12, 1862; promoted to 2d Lieutenant Co. H.

Corp. Adam J. Hagar, Woodland; enlisted Aug. 11, 1862; mustered out June 17, 1865.

Corp. James G. Jordan, Woodland; enlisted Aug. 11, 1862; mustered out June 17, 1865.

Judge B. Barnum, mustered out June 4, 1865.

Aaron J. Cupp, mustered out June 4, 1865.

Marcus G. Corsett, mustered out June 4, 1865.

Charles Dewey, died of disease, Jan. 11, 1864.

L. D. Edson, died of disease, Aug. 9, 1864.

Samuel E. Grant, mustered out June 4, 1865.

Hugh Kilpatrick, mustered out June 4, 1865.

Henry Miller, died of disease at Washington, D. C., Feb. 6, 1864.

Levi L. Paddock, died of disease at Elmira, N. Y., Aug. 8, 1864.

Jeremiah Riggs, died of disease at Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 1, 1864. 19

Oscar E. Sheldon, died of disease at Alexandria, Va., Feb. 23, 1863.

Joel St. Johns, discharged for disability, Aug. 14, 1863.

Milo Sheldon, mustered out June 4, 1865.

Samuel S. Straight, mustered out June 4, 1865.

George W. Tyler, discharged for disability, May 6, 1864.

William H. Wheeler, died at Farmville, Va., April 7, 1865.

Ransom Wolcott, mustered out June 4, 1865.

John Wilcox, Co. K; mustered out May 30, 1865.

TWENTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY

FROM BARRY.

Henry B. Moon, Co. D; mustered out July 26, 1865.

FROM ALLEGAN.

Oscar E. Dunton, 2d Ind. Co. Sharpshooters; died in Andersonville prison-pen.

TWENTY-NINTH INFANTRY FROM BARRY.

J. A. Kenyon, Co. H; mustered out Sept. 6, 1865.

FIRST MICHIGAN (102D U. S.) COLORED INFANTRY FROM BARRY.

Cairo Bolin, Co. B; mustered out Sept. 30, 1865.

Amos Cisco, Co. B; mustered out Sept. 30, 1865.

Amos Swanagan, Co. C; mustered out Sept. 30, 1865.

FROM ALLEGAN.

James Chambers, Co. F; mustered out Sept. 30, 1865.

Albert Tolbert, Co. F; mustered out Sept. 30, 1865.

Musician William Gilmore, Co. G, Gun Plain; enlisted Dec. 20, 1863; mustered out Sept. 30, 1865.

Aquilla Corey, Co. H; mustered out Sept. 30, 1865.

William J. Harris, Co. H; mustered out Sept. 30, 1865.

David Silence, Co. I; mustered out Sept. 30, 1865.

FIRST SHARPSHOOTERS

BARRY SOLDIERS.

Musician Charles M. Stephens, Co. A; enlisted April 18, 1863; mustered out July 28, 1865.

Amos W. Bowen, Co. A; mustered out July 28, 1865.

Edward F. Cox, Co. A; died in action near Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864.

Edgar F. Davidson, Co. A; died of disease at Camp Douglas, Ill., June 23, 1864.

Curtis A. Davidson, Co. A; mustered out June 28, 1865.

Elias Farwell, Co. A; mustered out Aug. 1, 1865, from Vet. Res. Corps.

Joseph Fisher, Co. A; discharged for disability.

John Fisher, Co. A; died of disease at Kalamazoo, Michigan, Jan. 28, 1863.

Benjamin F. Hinckley, Co. A; died of wounds at Washington, D. C., July 12, 1864.

Nathaniel Jeffreys, Co. A; discharged Nov. 22, 1864.

Darius A. Kent, Co. A; mustered out July 28, 1865.

John Livingston, Co. A; died of disease near Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864.

Henry Stevens, Co. A; mustered out June 28, 1865.

Gilbert Wilber, Co. A; died in action near Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864.

Robert Finch, Co. B; discharged for disability, Sept. 17, 1864.

Darius Fonts, Co. C; mustered out July 28, 1865.

John McGraw, Co. F; died of disease at Andersonville prison, Ga., Oct. 26, 1861.

David E. Grant, Co. G; died of disease at Camp Douglas, Ill., December, 1863.

Charles D. Beckford, Co. I; mustered out July 28, 1865.

Herman McIntyre, Co. I; mustered out July 28, 1865.

John R. Pitts, Co. I; mustered out July 28, 1865.

Francis Marquette, Co. K; mustered out June 27, 1865.

ALLEGAN SOLDIERS.

Levi Porter, Co. C; died in Andersonville prison-pen, Aug. 2, 1864.

Obadiah Gleason, Co. D; discharged for disability.

William Hawley, Co. C; died of disease at Camp Douglas, Ill., Feb. 26, 1864.

FORTY-FOURTH ILLINOIS INFANTRY

FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Francis P. Backus, Prairieville, Co. H; died in Missouri, Dec. 16, 1861.

Edward Doyle, Yankee Springs, Co. H; died of wounds, April 6, 1862.

Sergeant Arthur Hamilton, Yankee Springs, Co. H; veteran, enlisted Jan. 1, 1864; mustered out Sept. 25, 1865.

Corp. Benj. F. Norris, Yankee Springs, Co. H; veteran, enlisted Jan. 1, 1864; mustered out Sept. 25, 1865.

John Shelp, Prairieville, Co. H; discharged for disability, Jan. 12, 1863.

Thos. W. Travis, Prairieville, Co. H; mustered out May 26, 1865.

Philip Terry, Yankee Springs, Co. H; veteran, enlisted Jan. 1, 1864; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Feb. 4, 1865.

FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Chas. W. Bates, Allegan, Co. H; discharged for disability, Feb. 1, 1862.

James M. Conrad, Gun Plain, Co. H; veteran, enlisted Jan. 1, 1864; promoted to Sergeant

Lafayette Willis, Allegan, Co. H; discharged for disability, Jan. 10, 1862.

SIXTY-SIXTH ILLINOIS INFANTRY (WESTERN SHARPSHOOTERS)

FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Andrew J. Herrick, Co. D; discharged for disability, April 25, 1862.

Samuel Russell, Co. D; discharged for disability, Oct. 23, 1863.

Michael Whalen, Co. D; mustered out July 7, 1865.

NINETEENTH WISCONSIN INFANTRY

FROM ALLEGAN COUNTY.

Edward P. Adams, Wayland, Co. H; died of wounds at Fort Monroe, Va., Dec. 11, 1864.

FIRST REGIMENT UNITED STATES SHARPSHOOTERS.

FROM BARRY COUNTY.

Leander P. Johnson, Co. K; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 15, 1863.

Edwin B. Parks, Co. K; discharged by order, Oct. 8, 1864.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Major David Cornwell, enlisted as a private in Co. K, Eighth Illinois Infantry, at Bloomington, Ill., April 25, 1861;

He served three months, and re-enlisted in the same company and regiment for three years.

Major David Cornwell was in the battles of Fort Donnellson and Pittsburg Landing.

He transferred to Bat. D, Second Illinois Light Artillery, serving as private and bugler.

In February, 1863, he commissioned 1st Lieutenant Fifth U. S. Artillery (colored).

Major Cornwell was wounded at Milliken's Bend, La. and then promoted to Captain June 6, 1863, and com. Major in February, 1864.

He was then on staff till close of war and mustered out May 20, 1866.